Love medicine and miracles pdf


 

š¯—£š¯——š¯—™ | On Jan 1, , A.B.R. Thomson and others published Love, Medicine and Miracles. Surgeon Bernie S. Siegel gives an inspirational, first-hand account of how patients can participate in their own recovery. Unconditional love is the most po. Read Love, Medicine and Miracles by Bernie S. Siegel for free with a 30 day free trial. I didn't have a class on healing and love, how to talk with patients, or the.

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Love Medicine And Miracles Pdf

This books (Love, Medicine, and Miracles [PDF]) Made by Bernie S. Siegel About Books none To Download Please Click. Love, Medicine and Miracles: Lessons Learned about Self-Healing from a Surgeon's Experience with Exceptional Patients [Bernie S. Siegel] on site. com. Miracles, is based. Siegel practices medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. In. he started ECaP (Exceptional Cancer Patients), a group-therapy pro-.

Love, Medicine and Miracles - Bernie S. Siegel privacy. It has to be paid dearly for and only acquired with much patience and great effort. I came to it only after a long period of unhappiness and soul searching in my profession. I was not healed during my training, and yet I was expected to heal others. In the early s, after more than a decade as a practicing surgeon, I was finding my job very painful. Intuitively I felt there must be some way I could help the hopeless cases by going beyond my role as a mechanic, but it took years of difficult growth before I understood how to do so. It was an exciting challenge; it kept practice from becoming dull. After several years, however, the challenges themselves became monotonous.

Moving my desk and working on a first-name basis were only symptoms of a larger change. I got involved with my patients. I no longer shielded myself emotionally from the scenes of sadness I had to witness each day. One day on rounds I found one patient lying on his side, drooling, his face stuporous from drugs, marshaling all his remaining concentration on holding his urinal, completely oblivious of a marvelous sunlit view through the window in front of him.

He was lying in a pool of mingled grape juice and bile, and I found myself staring at the striking color of the stained sheet. The contrast of beauty and suffering overwhelmed me. Soon, however, I found I could draw strength from my patients. When I considered a man and wife, he with severe heart disease and she with widespread breast cancer, each trying to survive to help the other, my own sense of helplessness seemed somehow lessened.

The compassion of another woman, in terrible pain from fractures of both arms but still worried that I was working too late, virtually banished my fatigue.

First I began hugging patients, figuring they needed my reassurance. Later I found I was saying, " I need to hug you," so that I could go on.

And even if they were on respirators, my patients reached out to help me with a touch or a kiss, and my guilt, fatigue, and despair evaporated. They were saving me.

The elderly often wonder why they have lived so long only to suffer such protracted misery and humiliation. I feel we should be able to do more to help a person let go and end life easily when the value of each day is gone. I am talking about natural means of letting go, which are available to us all when death is not considered a failure.

After a massive heart attack, he was strapped to a bed, with tubes in every orifice. The damage was so great that a no resuscitation order was issued. He was weeping in pain and fear, but no one would authorize any painkillers, afraid that the drugs would hasten the inevitable and look like euthanasia. He administered a shot of Nembutal. With the drug Stephen was able to relax and leave his body peacefully.

He breathed a Thank you and slipped quietly away in five minutes. He would have been better off in the street than in the hospital. The end would have been quicker and less of an ordeal for all concerned. The word hospital comes from the Latin for guest, but seldom is the institution truly hospitable.

Little attention is given to caring or healing, as opposed to medicating. What freedom is given patients to maintain their identity? Recently Sam, a patient who healed remarkably fast after a hernia repair, explained in a letter how a freer atmosphere helped him:. What did bother me, though, is why I was such a restrained, co-operative, model good patient. I mean, I almost always make it known who I am wherever I go, making waves just to make waves.

Love, Medicine & Miracles by Bernie S. Siegel (1986-05-03)

So I gave it lots of thought, and the only answer I could come up with is that the hospital setting was so non-authoritative especially with the new non-uniform dress code, which confused me and the staff so real , that I had nothing to rebel against.

And I think that my speedy healing, my not feeling helpless and dependent, made me feel I was in control anywayā€”and there was no need for me to make a big display of it. We must face that responsibility by offering the kind of loving support that we expect the family to provide. I think of one of my patients, with carcinoma of the colon and metastases to the lungs and brain, refusing treatment so that he could die in the sun on his front porch, listening to the birds.

By allowing myself to feel as sharply as I could the same pain and fear that my patients felt, I came to realize that there is an aspect of medicine more important than all the technical procedures. I learned that I had much more than surgery to offer and that my help could extend even to the dying and their survivors.

In fact, I concluded that the only real reason to stay in this business was to offer people a friendship they can feel, just when they need it most. As my partner, Dick Selzer, who is a fine essayist as well as a fine surgeon, has written in Mortal Lessons: I do not know when it was that I understood that it is precisely this hell in which we wage our lives that offers us the energy, the possibility to care for each other.

It is much later that it comes. No easy shaft of grace this, but the cumulative murmuring of the numberless wounds he has dressed, the incisions he has made, all the sores and ulcers and cavities he has touched in order to heal. In the beginning it is barely audible, a whisper, as from many mouths.

Slowly it gathers, rising from the streaming flesh until, at last, it is a pure callingā€” an exclusive sound, like the cry of certain solitary birdsā€”telling that out of the resonance between the sick man and the one who tends him there may spring that profound courtesy that the religious call Love.

Love, Medicine & Miracles by Bernie S. Siegel (1986-05-03)

In June , my practice of medicine changed as a result of an unexpected experience I had at a teaching seminar. Oncologist O. The Simontons were the first Western practitioners to use imaging techniques against cancer, and together with James L. Creighton they described their methods in Getting Well Again. The Simontons had already published their first results with terminal cancer patients. Of their first patients, none of whom was expected to live more than a year, 19 percent had gotten rid of their cancer completely, and the disease was regressing in another 22 percent.

Those who eventually did succumb had, on the average, doubled their predicted survival time. When I looked around during the first workshop session, I was amazed and angered to find that I was the only body doctor there. There were a psychiatrist and a holistic practitioner, but not one other primary-care physician out of seventy-five participants.

Those attending were mostly social workers, patients, and psychologists. Here I was, an M. The literature on mind-body interaction was separate, and therefore unknown to specialists in other areas. I realized for the first time how far ahead theology, psychology, and holistic medicine are in this respect. I thought about the health records of doctors.

They have more problems with drugs and alcohol, and a higher suicide rate, than their patients. They feel more hopeless than their patients and die faster after the age of sixty-five. No wonder many people are reluctant to go to mainstream physicians.

The Simontons taught us how to meditate. At one point they led us in a directed meditation to find and meet an inner guide. I approached this exercise with all the skepticism one expects from a mechanistic doctor. Join Bernie as he shares his powerful journey through life while offering us special nuggets of his sacred wisdom. Listen to Bernie Wednesday-Friday at View full schedule of all show times at Dreamvisions7 Radio View full schedule of all show times at Dreamvisions7 Radio.

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Tag Archives: Posted on May 28, by Bernie Siegel. Related posts: Search in http: Bernie also holds one of his support groups there. Join our mailing list to receive periodic news from Bernie Siegel, MD. Email Address. In he began talking about patient empowerment and the choice to live fully and die in peace. Read more. All rights reserved. He covers a wide range of mind-body research and theory If you pi Wow, I picked up this book from the used bookstore on a whim to help me on my ever-challenging quest to pick a career path If you pick up this book, I can almost promise you'll be hooked.

Feb 15, Aubree Deimler rated it it was amazing Shelves: I enjoyed Dr. Siegel's story telling and observations as to what makes an exceptional patient. I love how his main methods of healing are helping others to find love and peace with themselves. I appreciate his methods of using drawings to depict disease as a medium into the subconscious.

Very intrigued by the last chapter: Oct 15, Willo Font rated it it was amazing. This one is a must to have. One that you will go back to remind ourselves of the power in us. Sep 13, Gina Herald rated it really liked it. Though I don't endorse it as the only means to healing, understanding what people get out of being sick in the first place break from being valued mainly for productivity, being shown that they will be cared for etc, is a central and deeply underestimated factor in helping people get well.

When sustained and untreated mental illness causes stress that the body absorbs to its detriment, we have to start looking at the link between the two. We also have to starting seeing the link between interp Though I don't endorse it as the only means to healing, understanding what people get out of being sick in the first place break from being valued mainly for productivity, being shown that they will be cared for etc, is a central and deeply underestimated factor in helping people get well.

We also have to starting seeing the link between interpersonal and intrapersonal linguistics, which reflect and shape the framework of our behaviors.

Our behaviors are the only way we engage materially with the world, the "agent" behind our various ingestions. We pay for our incapacity to engage in reciprocal self-referential relationships--replacing them with hierarchical or contractual relationships--by the illnesses of our body. I think people who haven't mastered these spheres and want to talk transpersonal are in for a big surprise about how principles engage, refine, or destroy multiple levels in sneaky ways.

Oct 12, Alana Cash rated it it was amazing. If you are new to the idea of alternative healing methods, this is a great book to start with.

Siegel is a surgeon and he begins the book with medical concept of disease and cures, including surgery, drugs, radiation, etc. His focus is generally on cancer. But he also introduces the concept that a person's thoughts and beliefs can both cause and cure illness.

Toward the beginning of the book, he seemed to lean back toward traditional medicine being more responsible for curing illness. However, as If you are new to the idea of alternative healing methods, this is a great book to start with. However, as the book continued, Siegel began to explain all the undexpected healings of individual patients - so-called, exceptional patients. Those with healings that could not be explained by their doctors who had resigned them to death and instead they lived and healed.

Siegel speaks about doctors who give hope or deny hope to their patients and the effect that has. He speaks of support and formed a support group himself. And, he speaks of love. The book moves from the mundane to the sacred. It is well worth reading.

Reading this book 30 odd years since publication shows how far we have NOT come in either curing or healing patients with cancer or any other chronic illness. So, having no real cure for cancer but the old ideas of surgery, radiation and chemo, the concept of healing is an important one and Bernie Siegal remains right on target all these years later. The book has made me watch him on You Tube and I have to say that his words both in print and in person are filled with hope, and as he so rightly s Reading this book 30 odd years since publication shows how far we have NOT come in either curing or healing patients with cancer or any other chronic illness.

The book has made me watch him on You Tube and I have to say that his words both in print and in person are filled with hope, and as he so rightly says "in the face of uncertainty, there is nothing wrong with hope. It may not cure but it will certainly help with the process of healing. Even more important is learning to live without fear, to be at peace with love and ultimately death.

Then healing can occur and one is no longer set up for failure by believing one can cure all physical problems and never die. If only there were more Dr Siegal's to go around. But, we have his book - amen! Jul 13, Emma Starr rated it it was amazing. I was really skeptical when I opened the front cover I had qualms about the title, but a friend had recommended it and spoke very highly of it.

But the more I read the more I could see truth in Siegel's arguments. I have had invasive surgery and lived with someone who had cancer, and having had those experiences, I can see how his analysis would have most definitely changed both how I dealt with and how others responded to those experiences.

While I don't know if this book is a 'life changer', I was really skeptical when I opened the front cover While I don't know if this book is a 'life changer', I think people should read it, because so many of its messages are applicable to everyone and would make the vast majority of lives better.

Feb 18, Correen rated it really liked it. A book that expresses a deep sense of caring, especially for those who are in a life crisis or illness. A friend suggested I read it after my cancer diagnosis. Siegel worked with cancer patients. His opinions are liberating and soothing. My diagnosis was not terribly serious and I knew about Siegel and his impact on medical care so it may have not been as significant as it might have been at another time.

I found his attitude warming but a bit simplistic. I think it is a very good book for someon A book that expresses a deep sense of caring, especially for those who are in a life crisis or illness.

I think it is a very good book for someone overwhelmed by the medical system. Oct 08, Coyote rated it liked it. This is a good book to read immediately after your cancer diagnosis but don't pass it up even if you have been ill for a while. While it is a little dated, Dr. Siegel reminds us to keep an open mind even when we just want to run and hide. An open mind and open heart foster optimism which is a healthy and healing emotion.

Your medical team has to remain receptive, too. If there is conflict, tension or anything less than complete honesty there, find new team members asap.

Apr 27, Dixie visburgh rated it really liked it.

I wish all physicians had the positive patient relationship he had with his patients. Aug 14, Radhika rated it it was amazing.

Love, Medicine & Miracles by Bernie S. Siegel by Bernie S. Siegel

This is a must read for everyone! Jul 12, Robin Dabler rated it it was amazing. Excellent book for people just being diagnosed with cancer.

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