Motown Bass Classics - Download as PDF File .pdf) or read online. Exact transcriptions with tab for 21 bass-heavy Motown faves. The samples are in pdf format and require Adobe Acrobat Reader to be installed. Click Here for. Listen and identify the qualities you hear. Use our checklist to help identify, label, and analyze the sound of Motown Bass. Listen to the rhythms. Imitate the feel.

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Motown Bass Classics Pdf

Motown Bass Classics Paperback – December 1, by Hal This item: Motown Bass Classics by Hal Leonard Corp. Sample Music Notation [41kb PDF]. When you really dig into the back catalogue of Motown recordings that he played on you can't help but come away with a healthy appreciation of what he bought. Format: PDF / ePub / Kindle. (Bass Recorded Versions). Exact transcriptions with tab for 21 bass-heavy. Motown faves: Ain't No Mountain High.

By all means read the list below, but I highly recommend you click the image below and go and check out the series of articles I wrote starting with The Only 6 Things That Bass Beginners Should Practice! The 50 Songs — Soul Version Here are the 50 songs plus a bit of annotation. A nice simple line to start with that repeats throughout the song. The first of many Jamerson lines. A simple line with a memorable hook underpinning the soulful sound of the Temptations. The song that posthumously made Otis Redding an international superstar. Legend has it that the whistled outro was an adlib because Otis forgot the words. A simple Duck Dunn bassline. Duck Dunn again — this Wilson Pickett song is a staple in the repertoire of cover bands. Another cover band staple, another simple yet effective Duck Dunn line. The challenge is to keep the picking hand technique even and consistent. Another Duck Dunn tune — he truly had mastered the greasy soul 8th note feel of the period. This tune features a bit more syncopation and some higher register notes. A memorable Jamerson line.

But the instrument was soon stolen. It had a three-tone sunburst finish, a tortoiseshell pickguard, rosewood fretboard and chrome pickup and bridge covers the latter containing a piece of foam used to dampen sustain and some overtones.

Motown Bass Classics

On the heel of the instrument he carved the word "FUNK" in blue ink. He typically set its volume and tone knobs on full. This instrument was also stolen, just days before Jamerson's death in , and never recovered.

He did not particularly take care of the instrument, as he stated: "The dirt keeps the funk". The neck may have eventually warped, as many claimed it was impossible to play.

While this made it more difficult to fret, Jamerson believed it improved the quality of the tone. The song that posthumously made Otis Redding an international superstar.

Legend has it that the whistled outro was an adlib because Otis forgot the words. A simple Duck Dunn bassline.

Duck Dunn again — this Wilson Pickett song is a staple in the repertoire of cover bands. Another cover band staple, another simple yet effective Duck Dunn line. The challenge is to keep the picking hand technique even and consistent.

Another Duck Dunn tune — he truly had mastered the greasy soul 8th note feel of the period. This tune features a bit more syncopation and some higher register notes. A memorable Jamerson line. See 10 above — more of the same!

James Brown. The Godfather.

Great tune, great to play. Early Stevie Wonder. More Duck Dunn 8th notes.

James Jamerson

A good workout for left and right hand co-ordination. We start looking at shuffles with Green Onions. Simple minor blues, but a great illustration of the shuffle feel.

A tune with a really subtle shuffle feel. This is from back in the day when Jamerson kept it simple. In bar two, we use an open E while playing an Ebm7 chord, normally unheard of, but as a ghost note it's very effective. Pentatonic-based riffs are common in Motown style bass lines.

MOTOWN BASS CLASSICS - HIDDEN - terney.info

Jamerson often used a movement over major chords to make his bass lines sing more, become more melodic. The major pentatonic scale is used almost entirely in these first two bars. Over the C chord, we use exclusively the major triad, C, E, and G.

In bar two, we use only the A minor triad, A, C, and E. In bars 3 and 4, we get away from the triad in favor of a bluesier pattern. We have an active line that changes directions horizontally very quickly and demonstrates our dropping the biscuit technique.

We drop it in bar 1 descending down to that major 3rd, A, on the last 16th note of beat 2. Of course, we need those in-between notes before we get to the A to create the dropped effect.

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