Ann crittenden the price of motherhood pdf


 

The following is an excerpt from The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued by Ann Crittenden ( Metropolitan. The price of motherhood by Ann Crittenden; 4 editions; First published in ; Subjects: In library, Mothers, Economic aspects of Motherhood. Download Citation on ResearchGate | On Dec 1, , Maryann O. Keating and others published Ann Crittenden, The Price of Motherhood.

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Ann Crittenden The Price Of Motherhood Pdf

Ann Crittenden Bold, galvanizing, and full of innovative solutions, The Price of Motherhood was listed by the Chicago Tribune as one of the Download PDF. The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World is Still the Least Valued [Ann Crittenden] on terney.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying. THE MOMMY TAX. ANN CRITTENDEN. In this selection, taken from The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important. Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued.

Reading Guide Book Summary Bold and galvanizing, full of innovative solutions, The Price of Motherhood reveals the glaring disparity between the value created by mothers' work and the reward women receive for carrying out society's most important job. Drawing on hundreds of interviews from around the country, as well as the most current research in economics, sociology, history, child development,. The price of motherhood is everywhere apparent. College-educated women pay a "mommy tax" of more than a million dollars in lost income when they have a child. Family law deprives mothers of financial equality in marriage. Most child care is excluded from the gross domestic product, at-home mothers are not counted in the labor force, and the social safety net simply leaves them out. With passion and clarity, Crittenden dismantles the principal argument for the status quo: that it's a woman's "choice. Bold and galvanizing, full of innovative solutions, The Price of Motherhood reveals the glaring disparity between the value created by mothers' work and the reward women receive for carrying out society's most important job. Introduction The good mother, the wise mother. This made them both happy. As the boy grew into a man, the tree gave him her apples to sell for money, then her branches to build a house, and finally her trunk to make a boat. When the boy became a tired old man, the tree, by now nothing but a stump, offered him all she had left to sit on and rest. I would read the last line, "And the tree was happy. The very definition of a mother is selfless service to another. We don't owe Mother for her gifts; she owes us.

Now they are saying that two-thirds of national wealth is actually created by "human capital," which are the skills, abilities, and creative entrepreneurship of people.

If the child development research is true, then human development begins on day one. And the most important person forming these skills and capabilities is the person raising this child directly, most often the mother. We have completely ignored this central role that mothers play. So it's not a stretch to say that mothers are the most important producers in the economy.

And if so, we need to put much more respect and real value on the work. It's the only job I know of where you have to pay to do it, you don't get paid to do it. You pay a price economically to create an enormous amount of economic value, and I think that's wrong. The "Mommy Tax" Familyeducation.

The Price of Motherhood

Ann Crittenden: When you've been home raising children, you are looked at by employers as if your brain has been on ice, so you take a hit in your income, in the kind of wages you can command. I put a name on it: The Mommy Tax.

In other words, what is your lifetime loss of income if you have a kid, in terms of lowered income for the rest of your life? There's a lot of variation, but you can say, in general, that if a college-educated woman has one child, she will lose about a million dollars in lifetime earnings.

I didn't have my child until I was over 40, and I already had a number of years working. But my Mommy Tax is close to a million.

Motherhood penalty

People do not think about this. When they think about what a child costs, they think about diapers, school tuition. The biggest single cost is the loss of income to the parent who takes his or her time to be with the child.

This made them both happy. As the boy grew into a man, the tree gave him her apples to sell for money, then her branches to build a house, and finally her trunk to make a boat.

When the boy became a tired old man, the tree, by now nothing but a stump, offered him all she had left to sit on and rest.

I would read the last line, "And the tree was happy.

The very definition of a mother is selfless service to another. We don't owe Mother for her gifts; she owes us. And in return for her bounty, Mother receives I thought I was being sympathetic, but I realize now that my deeper attitude was one of compassionate contempt, or perhaps contemptuous compassion. Deep down, I had no doubt that I was superior, in my midtown office over-looking Madison Avenue, to those unpaid housewives pushing brooms.

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They're letting our side down. It never occurred to me that women might be at home because there were children there; that housewives might become extinct, but mothers and fathers never would. A mother's work is not just invisible; it can become a handicap.

A woman from Long Island, New York, with a master's degree in special education was advised repeatedly that when she went job hunting she should not mention her thirteen years of caring for a disabled, chronically ill child. All those years of courageous tenacity and resilience would be held against her or, at best, considered irrelevant.

The idea that time spent with one's child is time wasted is embedded in traditional economic thinking. People who are not formally employed may create human capital, but they themselves are said to suffer a deterioration of the stuff, as if they were so many pieces of equipment left out to rust. The extraordinary talents required to do the long-term work of building human character and instilling in young children the ability and desire to learn have no place in the economists' calculations.

Economic theory has nothing to say about the acquisition of skills by those who work with children; presumably there are none.

The price of motherhood : why the most important job in the world is still the least valued

Here is how economists have summed up the adverse effects of child-rearing on a person's qualifications: "As a woman does not work [sic] during certain periods, less working experience is accumulated. This effect is known as atrophy. The devaluation of mothers' work permeates virtually every major institution. Not only is caregiving not rewarded, it is penalized. These stories illustrate the point: Joanna Upton, a single mother working as a store manager in Massachusetts, sued the company for wrongful dismissal after it fired her for refusing to work overtime -- until nine or ten at night and all day Saturday.

Upton had been hired to work A. Yet she lost her suit.

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that under state contract law, an at-will employee may be fired "for any reason or for no reason at all" unless the firing violates a "clearly established" public policy.

Massachusetts had no public policy dealing with a parent's responsibility to care for his or her child. A woman in Texas gave up a fifteen-year career in banking to raise two children. Her husband worked extremely long hours and spent much of his time on the road.

She realized that only if she left her own demanding job would the child have the parental time and attention he needed. For almost two decades she worked part-time as a consultant from her home, and for several years she had little or no income. Recently the Social Security Administration sent her an estimate of her retirement income -- a statement that was full of zeroes for the years spent caregiving.

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