Here are some people who have written books, telling what they did and why they did those things: John Dean. Henry Kissinger. Adolph Hitler. Caryl Chessman. ANGLE ON THE PET SEMATARY the work of some long-gone child: PET SEMATARY. There a number of medical books scattered around him and he's. The plot of Stephen King s novel Pet Sematary () runs parallel to that of Mary considered Pet Sematary the most frightening book he has ever writen.

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Pet Sematary Book Pdf

Pet Sematary by Stephen King; 38 editions; First published in ; Horror tales, Cemeteries, Fiction, Accessible book, Protected DAISY. Page 1 of Pet Sematary by Stephen King Here are some people who have written books, telling what they did and why t. Tony Magistrale, in “Stephen King's Pet Sematary: Hawthorne's Woods Revisited ” and in his book Landscape of Fear: Stephen King5 American Gothic, finds a.

After his parents separated when Stephen was a toddler, he and his older brother, David, were raised by his mother. Parts of his childhood were spent in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where his father's family was at the time, and in Stratford, Connecticut. When Stephen was eleven, his mother brought her children back to Durham, Maine, for good. Her parents, Guy and Nellie Pillsbury, had become incapacitated with old age, and Ruth King was persuaded by her sisters to take over the physical care of the elderly couple. Other family members provided a small house in Durham and financial support. After Stephen's grandparents passed away, Mrs. King found work in the kitchens of Pineland, a nearby residential facility for the mentally challenged.

Is it a good book for my 10 year old son to read. Take in mind our governer Rick Perry called him A reading mastermind. He is very advanced but still is all the death talk still too much?

Jona Meow I am thirteen and I read it. Often I would stop and just think about death while reading, this novel especially focas's on that subject. Don't get me …more I am thirteen and I read it.

eBOOK @PDF Pet Sematary FULL-PAGE

Don't get me wrong I loved it, but I got kinda sad at times. I wouldn't let a ten year old read this let alone a friend my age. I hope this will help. See all 35 questions about Pet Sematary…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. Sort order. Just wow. I've put off reading this one for years because, well I'm a wimp.

There, I said it. When one of the most well-known names in the contemporary era of the horror genre says something is his scariest book, I take note.

It seems bizarre that I finally chose to tackle this one while having children the same age as Louis Creed's, it was precisely the perfect time to pick this up. I listened to almost the entire book over a hour period while road-tripping, and the experience was u Wow. I listened to almost the entire book over a hour period while road-tripping, and the experience was unparalleled to any I've had in the scope of reading thus far. Side note, Michael C.

Hall was the most excellent narrator for this. What likely was a 4 star read initially became a 5 star with no second thought. If you haven't experienced this version I cannot recommend it highly enough. Rather than a gory, blood and guts type of horror, this is a slow burning, queasy unease that explodes in the final chapters.

I don't think I could have fully appreciated what King intended to accomplish with this novel if I'd read it before having children of my own. That's not to say that people without kids won't appreciate this as highly, just as statement in my own personal journey. Only King can accomplish so much horror with so little bloodshed. I finished this days ago but have held off on reviewing until now because I feel like I'm still processing and I can't stop thinking about everything that occurred to this family.

I had spent so much time prior to reading this book in preparing myself for the big "things" that I was completely taken aback by how connected I became to the Creed family. This is why the detailed, slow burn; if I didn't care about this family, their neighbors, and the town in general, why would what happens at the end stick with me for the long haul?

Oh sure, I would have gasped and guffawed at the disturbing nature of the plot, but I wouldn't have been emotionally invested. If you've been hiding under my big rock for the past few decades and are just catching up on your Stephen King backlog, like me, I highly recommend picking this up.

It's not just about the scares with this one, but the contemplation on how grief can turn any of us into a monster. By far the best audible book I've chosen yet. View all 85 comments. While reading this book, all I that runs through my head is the song the Ramones made for the movie. So, I'm going to link the video so all of you can have it running through your head as well! I have seen the movie about 6 million 5 hundred and 8 times. And I love it! THIS is the first time I have read the book, and as there are While reading this book, all I that runs through my head is the song the Ramones made for the movie.

THIS is the first time I have read the book, and as there are a few differences in the book and movie, they both rock monkey butt! The book didn't scare me at all for some reason. I think because of the said 6 million 5 hundred and 8 times that I have seen it that maybe it acclimated me to the book.

Although, the movie is still creepy as hell. I totally freaked at the introduction to the book. King tells about moving to said place, teaching at the school, they had a cat named Smucky, their son was running to the road chasing the kite string like in the movie, but uh, didn't get killed!

And some other things. It was like a whole new little world right there for me that he actually wrote this based on some home stuff! Remember in the book where Jud the wonderful neighbor takes them out to the Pet Sematary? The hand was childish but careful. Okay, so there was a real I wonder if it's still there? Pet Sematary and their cat Smucky is buried there and that is what Mr. King's daughter wrote! I mean, I can't even. I want to go visit there now and see if the place is still there!

So wonderful Jud from across the road has a great friendship with Louis and the kids, a little iffy with Rachel. Anyway, Jud is the one that has Louis bury Church the cat when he gets hit on that damn road all of those crazy trucks would fly down. But little did Louis know that Church was going to come back, even when the poor boy from the school Pascow who got hit by a car and killed, came back as a ghost to warn Louis.

Why don't people just listen? So now Church is back home and he isn't the same any more. But the family didn't find out anything happened to him while they were out of town. They just think he's weird and stinks when they get home. Uh, yeah! So then, it all goes to hell in a hand basket. Gage is killed on the road.

He does it, Louis takes Gage to the Pet Sematary and yeah.

Pet Sematary

Gage isn't the same when he comes back! He kills Jud! Damn it all! And Louis finally takes out Church and Gage, but does he learn from his lesson? Nooooooooooooooo, he takes and buries Rachel in the Sematary. Well, you can use your imagination for the rest of that one. This was an awesome book to read for Halloween time or any time really but it's extra special at Halloween!

Melissa Martin's Reading List View all 54 comments. And what you own Behind their house there is a path that leads to a 'Pet Sematary', where the children of surrounding areas have buried their beloved pets in years gone by.

Deeper in the woods there lies an ancient Indian burial ground, that Louis discovers has some sinister properties when their family cat dies It's no secret that Pet Sematary is my f "Cause what you download, is what you own.

It's no secret that Pet Sematary is my favourite King book, but this is the case for a number of different reasons. When I first started reading horror I couldn't imagine words on a page actually scaring me, I always felt like I needed something visual to keep me up at night.

Then I found Pet Sematary I'd never had an experience before where I actually felt scared to turn the page - this was of course in the climax at the end of the novel. My heart was racing, my palms felt sweaty, I just kept thinking, "There's no way this book is going to go THAT dark" clearly I didn't really know King yet!! And then it did. And a King junkie and Constant Reader was born.

When I was younger, my dad was diagnosed with MS, a debilitating disease that quite literally drained the life from him in front of our eyes. I guess this is similar in some ways to the Zelda and Rachel storyline, apart from the fact that my dad was never angry or resentful over his illness - or if he was, he never showed it in front of me.

He progressively got more and more ill, over time losing his ability to speak, walk, eat. Death was ultimately a relief. But what about those who are left behind? It's strange because even though I was only 10 when he died, which is around 18 years ago, there are still days or times when the unrelenting grief can come out of nowhere and floor me. The loss of a parent is something you never get over, it is simply something you learn to live with.

The only thing that can possibly be worse is the loss of a child. King's depiction of the grief and loss that both Louis and Rachel go through is so accurate it hurts. This book really resonated with me on a deep level, as I had never before read such a harrowing and realistic outlook on death and loss. There are so many passages that I've made a note of and will revisit over and over again.

The way King crafted a book that is terrifying and heartbreaking in equal measures will never fail to astound me. Because this book IS terrifying - to lose someone is terrifying, to have to try to move on is terrifying, for them to come back "different" is also terrifying.

Sometimes on instagram I will see people criticising Louis' decisions or making out that he's a bad parent and it makes me want to scream. Grief and loss does not allow for rational thinking.

It does not allow for good judgement. It can be all encompassing to the point where you feel like you can't breathe. I defy anyone to tell me that if in a similar position you wouldn't even consider it not forgetting the fact that there are other forces at work here.

I know I would. Couple that with the overwhelming devastation and loss and your decision is pretty made. So to label Louis as a bad parent is absolutely ridiculous to me.

Don't get me wrong, there was Ellie to consider, he still had that to live for, but in those heady initial days following such a heartbreaking loss, rational thinking ain't happening. It's a bit of a slow-build this book, but the pay-off is worth it. I enjoyed getting to know the Creeds, watching them form friendships with the Crandalls across the road.

All the good stuff, you know, before shit hits the fan. And when shit hits the fan, it is almost too much to take. Gage's little Star Wars shoe in the middle of the road Images that send chills down my spine. Then the unbearable dread as Louis digs up that coffin, not knowing what exactly he is going to be presented with.

The way Louis initially thinks that Gage has no head as there is a dark moss covering his face The little figure appearing in Louis' room as he sleeps, the child's laughter that Jud can hear Ellie having these vivid dreams and knowing that her family is in danger. This is really a masterclass in how to craft well-written, piss-your-pants horror.

I bow to you, Sai King. Some of King's best writing in here and one of his best endings too. The adaptation for this book is also pretty decent: Louis is a hot dad, Fred Gwynne was born to play the role of Jud, Zelda will trigger a cold sweat to run down your back I could quite honestly write an entire thesis on Pet Sematary, so I'll end it here.

All I'll say is this: Incredible narration by Michael C Hall. Still 5 stars. Update 2: Somehow loved it even more!! View all 25 comments. Two things about this book: When I was a kid, I had to make sure the cover of this book was not facing out or I could not sleep.

I didn't even like to look at it when I was awake! View all 45 comments. On the contrary, it seems that some exponential effect begins to obtain as deeper and deeper darkness falls—as little as one may like to admit it, human experience tends, in a good many ways, to support the idea that when the nightmare grows black enough, horror spawns horror, one coincidental evil begets other, often more deliberate evils, until finally blackness seems to cover everything.

And the most terrifying question of all may be just how much horror the human mind can stand and still maintain a wakeful, staring, unrelenting sanity. In my teens, Stephen King has crafted my nightmares. I am masochistically glad to say that in my adulthood, that has not changed. He had been responsible for my bedtime routine. Close all doors, bathroom, closet. Check under bed, a terrifying prospect as it stands. Make sure blanket is firmly tucked in at the feet - who knows what creatures might reach up to grab or nibble on them.

Make sure blanket is firmly tucked in on all sides, so that only the head is exposed. And still, all that preparation for the battle that is bedtime is nigh useless as the nightlights cast shadows that turn into shadowy creatures in the depths of night. Glints of light cast upon objects are spun by a restless mind into monsters. It has been years since I've read a Stephen King book.

That's because my attention span is much shorter now. Action action action. I confess that this book did plod along in some parts for me, but despite all that, there is no doubt in my mind that King is a master at building atmosphere. He is tremendously skilled at crafting characters, at making them human, at making them relatable in their poignancy, with moments like a father explaining the inevitability of death to his young child.

I think we can all relate to that moment. If all those animals had died and been buried, then Church could die any time! To herself. Death was a vague idea; the Pet Sematary was real. I would say half the book isn't a horror in a traditional sense, but an exploration of human grief and behavior, and human nature itself can be quite terrifying. That isn't to say that this book isn't filled with moments that makes a chill run down your spine. The wind pushed and pulled its fingers through his hair, and for a moment the old, childlike fear of the dark rushed through him, making him feel weak and small and terrorized.

Was he really going into the woods with this corpse in his arms, passing under the trees where the wind walked, from darkness into darkness? And alone this time? I've long since outgrown my nightly monster-prepping ritual, but I know tonight I won't be sleeping easily. I brought you something, I brought you something!

View all 15 comments. PS is not particularly gory, but definitely sad, sick, dark, and disgusting with more t "Sometimes dead is better" View all 53 comments. Carol Carol wrote: When I read it Carol wrote: When I read it years ago I stopped reading King it creeped me out so.

Just plain creepy. Sharyl Good review! I keep meaning to read this. That ending though This ended up being very different than what I expected. The less you know about it, the better! View all 6 comments.

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Once upon a time when I was a child, I remember talking with my family about horror movies. Somebody asked what was the scariest movie you've watched, and my mom without thinking said 'Pet Sematary'. I remember laughing and saying 'How on earth could a movie named Pet Sematary be scary?

This book is scariest and creepiest book I've ever read, and I'm sure it'll stay number 1 for a long time. It made me think about stuff I don't want, or refuse, to think a Once upon a time when I was a child, I remember talking with my family about horror movies.

It made me think about stuff I don't want, or refuse, to think about. One being death. Most of us don't want to think about death, 'cause we think we're invincible But we're not. At few parts I even thought about putting the book down, because it was all too much, but I just couldn't.

I wasn't even able to stop reading, 'cause I was dying no pun intended to know what was going to happen next. I guess horror books do that do you. In conclusion, amazing book, and I'm definitely gonna re-read it in very, very distant future. View all 24 comments. Stephen King's legacy will be vast, I have no doubt.

We'll still read him hundreds of years from now, just as we have with Poe and Dickens and many others. Of all his master works, however, I take the somewhat unpopular stance that Pet Sematary is his magnum opus. Re-reading it now only confirms this opinion. When I first read Pet Sematary I couldn't have been older than 13 I knew right away that it was more than a typical scary story.

For one, it made me feel decades older. More entuned Stephen King's legacy will be vast, I have no doubt. More entuned to human nature. King never shies away from character, but he really digs deep with Louis Creed. There are numerous novels that portray death well James Agee's A Death in the Family is superb but fittingly enough, it's this gothic horror novel that illustrates it best.

Death isn't pretty and surviving it can be just as grotesque. Pet Sematary gives all of this to us, and more. Much more than we want to see. But maybe we need to see it to understand.

King adds supernatural influence as justification, but let's be honest - no justification is needed. Creed and his decisions are as relatable as they are tragic, which is something never quite accomplished--not on the same level at least--with Jack Torrance or Annie Wilkes or Carrie White. Not dissing those other books, I'm a fan boy for them too, but it's why I think Pet Sematary is King's greatest achievement.

For those interested in reading this one, for the first time or 20th, I highly recommend the new audio version narrated by Michael C.

His outstanding performance enriches the novel in ways I hadn't noticed before. View all 8 comments. I loved this book! What a creepy book. The unease and anxiety just keeps building in this book and it's brutal! It overwhelmed me since it felt similar to what I went through in regards to the deaths of my father and brother. But I pressed on an I loved this book! It was so atmospheric, and I was on the edge of my seat. You just know at that point in the book that things are going to drastically change when view spoiler [they bury Church.

It was gut wrenching and I'm not sure what I would have done in his shoes. This book is character driven and about the decisions we make in life. Good and bad! King did such a good job with this! Other thoughts, I did not like the character of Rachel Creed. She was a weak character, and I hated how she took her parents side and did not stick with Louis, her husband. And one last thing. While in Chicago visiting her grandparents, and presumably under the influence of Pascow, Ellie dreams the truth about Church, that he has been killed Pascow personally visits her dreams to warn her that her father is in danger Basically, Ellie and Pascow send Rachel to a rather gruesome death.

In any case, the forces at work in Ludlow are so powerful that they can insure that Rachel and Ellie will be away when Creed exhumes and reburies Journal of Popular Culture Gage. And those forces can extend their power beyond the realm of Ludlow. When it becomes apparent that something is wrong in Ludlow, Rachel is able to get a ticket back to Ludlow, but it is in a roundabout, time-consuming fashion.

She, like her husband, has been carefully orchestrated from the very beginning and orchestrated in such a way that they cannot resist. In this postmodern Gothic novel, King weaves together archaic lore and myth and the postmodern rebellion against rationalism. In fact, the key to understanding Pet Sematary and appreciating its rich complexity lies in noting the tension in that text between the supernatural and the modem American experience.

When King discusses Creed, he evaluates him as if he lived in our world and not in the Gothic world King has created for him.

The very real problems these authors wish to address, such as the nature of the American family, child abuse, crime, and gender, are addressed in such mythologically-exaggerated worlds that those worlds become the problem to be overcome, and not the issues that first inspired them. In Pet Sematary, King has transformed the Gothic tale in an exciting and truly horrifying fashion, but in doing so, he has made something so much more frightening that we forget to confront death.

One of the things that holds the American family together, King tells us in Pet Sematary, is its fear and avoidance of death. The novel Postmodern Gothic As King tells Winter, when the ideas came for the novel, and they came very quickly, it was not the death of a cat or the possible death of his own son that triggered his emotional response.

It was the possibility that they might come back from the dead Winter It deals with a fear that replaces the fear of death, and that fear is the fear of the return of the dead. Death may well be an issue the American family and society will not face, but then neither will Stephen King. Works Cited Bakhtin, Mikhail. Rabelais and His W o r l d. Helene Iswosky. Bloomington: Indiana UP, Collins, Jim. New York: Routledge, Erikson, Erik H. Insight and Responsibility. New York: Norton, Geertz, Clifford.

The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic, King, Stephen. New York: NAL, New York: Viking, Danse Macabre. New York: Everest House, Pet Sematary. But this does not stop Creed from eventu- ally burying his son and then his wife in the burial ground, bringing them both back but with homfying consequences. King is actually quite critical of his protagonist. More specifically, Creed is made to represent some- thing he is not, rational.

One does not have to be a clinical psychologist to realize early on in the novel that Creed is acting and behaving irra- tionally. When the family cat Church is presumably killed by one of those trucks, Creed responds irrationally. He does not build a fence at that point, heeding a real warning; no, he considers resurrecting Church. When Gage is killed by still another of those trucks, he, too, is resurrected in spite of how badly Church turns out. Gage goes on a killing spree, committing the ultimate atrocity, killing and cannibalizing his own mother.

Still, Creed does not learn from his mistake. He takes the corpse of his wife to the old Indian burial ground and resurrects her. No, Creed is not a rational man, but that is because King as author will not let him be rational. The driver of the truck which hits Gage cannot explain why he speeded up instead of slowing down.

And Creed himself is put into a deep sleep while Gage returns to wreck havoc at the Crandall home Because of the nature of the supernatural involvement in his world and its manifest power, Creed does not really have the freedom to be rational. What would it mean to be rational in the world of the Wendigo?

Before he dies, he issues a warn- ing. Later that night, now as a ghost, Pascow visits Creed again. His appearance is note- worthy. While in Chicago visiting her grandparents, and presumably under the influence of Pascow, Ellie dreams the truth about Church, that he has been killed Pascow personally visits her dreams to warn her that her father is in danger Basically, Ellie and Pascow send Rachel to a rather gruesome death. And those forces can extend their power beyond the realm of Ludlow.

When it becomes apparent that something is wrong in Ludlow, Rachel is able to get a ticket back to Ludlow, but it is in a roundabout, time-consuming fashion. She, like her husband, has been carefully orchestrated from the very beginning and orchestrated in such a way that they cannot resist. In this postmodern Gothic novel, King weaves together archaic lore and myth and the postmodern rebellion against rationalism.

In fact, the key to understanding Pet Sematary and appreciating its rich complexity lies in noting the tension in that text between the supernatural and the modem American experience. When King discusses Creed, he evaluates him as if he lived in our world and not in the Gothic world King has created for him. The very real problems these authors wish to address, such as the nature of the American family, child abuse, crime, and gender, are addressed in such mythologically-exaggerated worlds that those worlds become the problem to be overcome, and not the issues that first inspired them.

In Pet Sematary, King has transformed the Gothic tale in an exciting and truly horrifying fashion, but in doing so, he has made something so much more frightening that we forget to confront death.

Pet Sematary

One of the things that holds the American family together, King tells us in Pet Sematary, is its fear and avoidance of death. As King tells Winter, when the ideas came for the novel, and they came very quickly, it was not the death of a cat or the possible death of his own son that triggered his emotional response. It was the possibility that they might come back from the dead Winter It deals with a fear that replaces the fear of death, and that fear is the fear of the return of the dead.

Death may well be an issue the American family and society will not face, but then neither will Stephen King. Works Cited Bakhtin, Mikhail. Rabelais and His W o r l d.

Helene Iswosky. Indiana UP, Collins, Jim. Uncommon Cultures: Popular Culture and Post-Modernism. New York: Routledge,

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