The rockingdown mystery ebook


 

The Rockingdown Mystery (The Barney 'R' Mysteries Book 1) - Kindle edition by Enid Blyton. Download it Kindle Store; ›; Kindle eBooks; ›; Children's eBooks. The Rilloby Fair Mystery (Barney Mysteries #2) adventure for the four children, where friendships are forged and mysteries need solving. Distributed Proofreaders Canada, we pride ourselves on producing the best ebooks you can find. Enid Blyton - R Mystery. 2 02 The Rilloby Fair Mystery · 3 03 The Ring O' Bells Mystery · 4 04 The Rubadub Mystery · 5 05 The Rat-A-Tat.

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The Rockingdown Mystery Ebook

Rent and save from the world's largest eBookstore. Read, highlight, and take notes, Roger, Diana and Snubby make friends with Barney and Miranda whilst on holiday at Rockingdown village. I just finished reading the "The Mystery of. Snubby, Roger, Diana and Barney solve a mystery during a seaside vacation, with the help of their animal friends. Books. The Rockingdown Mystery (); The Rilloby Fair Mystery (); The Ring O'Bells Mystery (); The Rubadub Mystery (); The Rat-a-Tat.

Blyton, Enid Bibliography Enid Blyton was a British writer who published over children's or juvenile books during her year career. Blyton's most famous series was The Famous Five. Her works celebrated good food, spirit of comradeship, and honesty. By the s, Blyton's books had sold some 60 million copies and had been translated into nearly seventy languages. Enid Blyton was born in London, in a small flat above a shop in East Dulwich. She was the eldest of three children. From her earliest childhood, Blyton had been schooled in the belief that she would eventually be a musician. However, she had also started to write and send stories, articles, and poems to various periodicals. Blyton, who was trained as a kindergarten teacher at Ipswich High School, opened her own infants' school.

That is the story in a nutshell, but there is far more to this book than just a gripping plot. Above all, it is the melancholic atmosphere that I have never forgotten. The mansion has "an air of desolation and decay" about it, rather like the "mansion of gloom" in Edgar Allan Poe's tale, "The Fall of the House of Usher" Tales of Mystery and Imagination. When Miranda manages to enter the building through a barred nursery window, throwing down old toys and a handkerchief embroidered with the name "Bob," Roger muses that the nurseries may have been locked up complete with toys "because of memories, or something," reminding Diana how their own mother keeps the first tooth of his that came out, and Diana's first pair of shoes.

Diana remarks that "Mothers seem to be like that," which is unusually for her a tactless comment in front of both Barney and Snubby, whose mothers have died.

The Rockingdown Mystery

Even before entering the old mansion, the children sense that it is a place of sadness. On talking to the woman from the general store, they learn that the nurseries were shut up after Lord and Lady Rockingdown's two children, Arabella and Robert Bob , tragically died at the house.

Then Lord Rockingdown was killed in the war and his wife died of a broken heart. The fact that she has just seen toys from the nurseries brings the past alive for Diana and she is moved: "Poor little Bob! She actually had his small hanky in her pocket. He hadn't lived to grow up — but his hanky was still there.

And his soldier and book. Eerily, the rooms are still fully furnished, there are toys on the shelves and the table is laid for a meal initially Barney says, " There too we have dust and spiders, material a wedding-dress that was once white but is now "faded and yellow," and a table laid long ago for a meal. There is something terribly unhealthy about such rooms, which have preserved the sadness of the past within their walls.

Blyton's use of language and imagery throughout the book is striking. When Barney is trapped down in the caverns below the mansion, Blyton conjures up images of Hell which serve to underline the nightmarish qualities of the Underworld in which Barney is imprisoned.

We have descriptions of dark caverns and passages, and an underground stream, "black and gleaming.

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The same book contains "The Story of Orpheus and Eurydice," in which Orpheus is ferried across "the black river Styx" to the "long, dark passages" of the Underworld. All these elements are to be found in the underground world beneath Rockingdown Hall. The mention of the man with the pitchfork also makes me think of depictions of the Devil in Christianity as a creature with horns, a tail and a pitchfork.

Such images heighten the sense that Barney is surrounded by evil and is in real danger. When the boy finds his way of escape blocked by an iron-barred gate, we are reminded of the barred nursery window at the mansion, intensifying the atmosphere of imprisonment and gloom which pervades this book.

If we take a close look at words and phrases used in The Rockingdown Mystery, there are some lovely "Blytonian" gems.

The Rockingdown Mystery

Near the beginning of the book, when Roger and Diana go to meet Snubby off the train, we have a delightful touch of animation when Blyton describes how the train moves off: "The train gave itself a little shake, preparing to start off again The train steamed off importantly. She does not allow descriptions to slow the pace of her narrative but chooses succinct yet striking phrases that hit the nail on the head.

We have brief but vivid descriptions of some of the birds in the countryside around Rockingdown — " Diana's tendency to sulk is shown in two marvellous verbs — "gloomed" and "mooned. Like somebody belonging to the Little Folk, not to us. This is a series in which many characters, from the rather "peppery" Miss Pepper to Loony the dog, live up to their names in true Blyton fashion.

Both Mrs Round and the woman from the general store are stereotypical working-class gossips, enjoying telling tales of the old mansion and making it sound deliciously spooky. Mrs Round states: "There's doors there that shut of themselves, yes, and lock themselves too.

Several times we have statements that are ironic unintentionally so on the part of the speaker. One of the first things Miss Pepper says to Mr King is: "Appearances don't always tell the truth," while the woman from the general store remarks when Barney leaps up to get something from a high shelf : "You ought to be in a circus, you ought!

Other children's authors, such as Gwendoline Courtney and Antonia Forest, quote from Shakespeare in their children's fiction or have characters discuss his plays, but Blyton does not go as far as that. The Rockingdown Mystery is set in the summer and, on their first visit to Rockingdown Hall, the children have their picnic tea in the nurseries while a storm rages outside, so there is plenty of opportunity to quote from both A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest.

A few apt quotations could add comedy and richness to Blyton's book. On talking to the woman from the general store, they learn that the nurseries were shut up after Lord and Lady Rockingdown's two children, Arabella and Robert Bob , tragically died at the house.

Then Lord Rockingdown was killed in the war and his wife died of a broken heart.

The fact that she has just seen toys from the nurseries brings the past alive for Diana and she is moved: "Poor little Bob! She actually had his small hanky in her pocket. He hadn't lived to grow up — but his hanky was still there. And his soldier and book. Eerily, the rooms are still fully furnished, there are toys on the shelves and the table is laid for a meal initially Barney says, " There too we have dust and spiders, material a wedding-dress that was once white but is now "faded and yellow," and a table laid long ago for a meal.

There is something terribly unhealthy about such rooms, which have preserved the sadness of the past within their walls. Blyton's use of language and imagery throughout the book is striking. When Barney is trapped down in the caverns below the mansion, Blyton conjures up images of Hell which serve to underline the nightmarish qualities of the Underworld in which Barney is imprisoned. We have descriptions of dark caverns and passages, and an underground stream, "black and gleaming.

The same book contains "The Story of Orpheus and Eurydice," in which Orpheus is ferried across "the black river Styx" to the "long, dark passages" of the Underworld. All these elements are to be found in the underground world beneath Rockingdown Hall. The mention of the man with the pitchfork also makes me think of depictions of the Devil in Christianity as a creature with horns, a tail and a pitchfork.

Such images heighten the sense that Barney is surrounded by evil and is in real danger. When the boy finds his way of escape blocked by an iron-barred gate, we are reminded of the barred nursery window at the mansion, intensifying the atmosphere of imprisonment and gloom which pervades this book.

If we take a close look at words and phrases used in The Rockingdown Mystery, there are some lovely "Blytonian" gems. Near the beginning of the book, when Roger and Diana go to meet Snubby off the train, we have a delightful touch of animation when Blyton describes how the train moves off: "The train gave itself a little shake, preparing to start off again The train steamed off importantly.

She does not allow descriptions to slow the pace of her narrative but chooses succinct yet striking phrases that hit the nail on the head.

We have brief but vivid descriptions of some of the birds in the countryside around Rockingdown — " Diana's tendency to sulk is shown in two marvellous verbs — "gloomed" and "mooned. Like somebody belonging to the Little Folk, not to us. This is a series in which many characters, from the rather "peppery" Miss Pepper to Loony the dog, live up to their names in true Blyton fashion. Both Mrs Round and the woman from the general store are stereotypical working-class gossips, enjoying telling tales of the old mansion and making it sound deliciously spooky.

Mrs Round states: "There's doors there that shut of themselves, yes, and lock themselves too. Several times we have statements that are ironic unintentionally so on the part of the speaker. One of the first things Miss Pepper says to Mr King is: "Appearances don't always tell the truth," while the woman from the general store remarks when Barney leaps up to get something from a high shelf : "You ought to be in a circus, you ought!

Barney Mysteries Series by Enid Blyton

Other children's authors, such as Gwendoline Courtney and Antonia Forest, quote from Shakespeare in their children's fiction or have characters discuss his plays, but Blyton does not go as far as that. The Rockingdown Mystery is set in the summer and, on their first visit to Rockingdown Hall, the children have their picnic tea in the nurseries while a storm rages outside, so there is plenty of opportunity to quote from both A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest.

A few apt quotations could add comedy and richness to Blyton's book. How I'd love to see Diana face up to the spiders in the old mansion with the words: Weaving spiders come not here; Hence, you long-legg'd spinners, hence!

Which play is he reading in The Rubadub Mystery when he finds his father, and do he and his father ever act out scenes from Shakespeare together, just for fun? Frustratingly, Blyton never tells us.

It is strange that Roger and Diana, aged fourteen and thirteen respectively, should repeatedly refer to their mother as "Mummy" in this book. However, in later books they frequently revert to "Mummy. Another thing we have to accept when reading Blyton is that ideas used in one book are often reworked in another.

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