Eleven rings the soul of success epub


 

During his storied career as head coach of the Chicago Bulls and Los Angeles Lakers, Phil Jackson won more championships than any coach. Download books file now Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success Hardcover Epub Download for everyone book mediafire, rapishare, and mirror. Online PDF Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success, Read PDF Eleven Rings: The All Ebook Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success, PDF and EPUB Eleven Rings.

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Eleven Rings The Soul Of Success Epub

Access Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success => terney.info?download= PDF. Phil Jackson -Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success (Audio book). Editorial Reviews. From Booklist. Phil Jackson won an unprecedented 11 championship rings as an NBA coach (6 with the Chicago Bulls and 5 with the Los.

Shelves: leadership I can't exactly recall where I heard about Phil Jackson's book At any rate, I am not a huge basketball fan, but was intrigued about learning leadership lessons from this incredibly successful coach. I think there are some pointers to be gleaned from this book that would particularly be helpful to educators It's also interesting to imagine big, tough basketball players incorporating Phil's Zen oriented pursuits into their lives. This book makes me want to investigate Eastern religions a bit more and apply some of the principles outlined here to my personal and professional lives.

Shelves: leadership I can't exactly recall where I heard about Phil Jackson's book At any rate, I am not a huge basketball fan, but was intrigued about learning leadership lessons from this incredibly successful coach.

I think there are some pointers to be gleaned from this book that would particularly be helpful to educators It's also interesting to imagine big, tough basketball players incorporating Phil's Zen oriented pursuits into their lives.

This book makes me want to investigate Eastern religions a bit more and apply some of the principles outlined here to my personal and professional lives. Conroy's book is also about basketball, but also about the life lessons one learns by being on a team. It's a perfect storm in reverse: every good thing about it is enhanced by all the other good things that surround it. For a lifelong basketball fan with a deep interest in spiritual practice, creative improvisation, managing talent, and eliciting outstanding performance, it's a heady mix.

The book backfills my memory of the great games I still replay in my mind, going back to a limping Willis's unforgettable two shots in the final game against the Lakers in But it is more I love this book.

Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Eleven Rings by Phil Jackson. Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success by Phil Jackson ,. Hugh Delehanty. During his storied career as head coach of the Chicago Bulls and Los Angeles Lakers, Phil Jackson won more championships than any coach in the history of professional sports.

Even more important, he succeeded in never wavering from coaching his way, from a place of deep values. In his quest to reinvent himself, Jackson explored everything from humanistic psychology and Native American philosophy to Zen meditation. In the process, he developed a new approach to leadership based on freedom, authenticity, and selfless teamwork that turned the hypercompetitive world of professional sports on its head.

In Eleven Rings, Jackson candidly describes how he: Eleven times, Jackson led his teams to the ultimate goal: We all know the legendary stars on those teams, or think we do. This book is full of revelations: Get A Copy. Audio CD , 9 pages.

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Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Jun 08, Jimmy Williams rated it really liked it. Good quick read. Different look at all 11 championship runs. It always amazes me at how much preparation, energy and thought go into a single game or series. This book shows how mental the game of basketball is. This is refreshing these days considering our country celebrates mediocrity and stupidity don't believe me watch TV. It is also interesting to see his perspective on players like Jordan, Pippen, Kobe, and Shaq.

His ability to find various ways to motivate each player on his teams is wh Good quick read. His ability to find various ways to motivate each player on his teams is what allowed him to have the success he had. Phil Jackson is the greatest coach of my generation and in my personal opinion, Phil Jackson has the best books when it comes to coaches.

This book is no different. I also believe you will enjoy this book if you are not a fan of Phil, the Lakers, the Bulls, or even basketball. View all 3 comments. I can't exactly recall where I heard about Phil Jackson's book At any rate, I am not a huge basketball fan, but was intrigued about learning leadership lessons from this incredibly successful coach.

I think there are some pointers to be gleaned from this book that would particularly be helpful to educators It's also interesting to imagine big, tough basketball players incorporating Phil's Zen oriented pursuits into their lives. This book makes me want to investigate Eastern religions a bit more and apply some of the principles outlined here to my personal and professional lives.

Conroy's book is also about basketball, but also about the life lessons one learns by being on a team. May 26, Carl Lehmann-haupt rated it it was amazing. I love this book. It's a perfect storm in reverse: For a lifelong basketball fan with a deep interest in spiritual practice, creative improvisation, managing talent, and eliciting outstanding performance, it's a heady mix.

The book backfills my memory of the great games I still replay in my mind, going back to a limping Willis's unforgettable two shots in the final game against the Lakers in But it is more I love this book. But it is more than an intimate history of the game from a brilliant analyst.

You get to follow the growth of players like Jordan, Pippin, and Bryant, people who were great to start with, as they into something beyond mere skill and athleticism. You understand the delicacy with which Jackson handled someone as flamboyant and ornery as Rodman, successfully converting his eccentricities into consistent contributions at the highest level.

But the book is also a toolbox filled with brilliant how-tos: How to fuse gifted individuals into what Jackson calls a "tribe;" How to instill confidence and independence in fragile egos; how to elicit consistently great performance from every member of the team, from the stars to the role players coming off the bench; how to manage "the elephant," i. Jerry Krause. There are even simple but effective instructions in Zen Meditation. Eleven Rings is a lucid exposition of the ways it is still possible to function originally, creatively, and responsibly, while working with others.

He reminds me of Ingmar Bergman and Robert Bresson in that respect. Both were filmmakers with a religious dimension, who were known for their creative collaborations. But they worked at one remove from the commercial mainstream.

Jackson seems to have succeeded under the glare of the bright lights and the pressure of the big bucks. May 27, Michael Scott rated it liked it Shelves: The book covers this phenomenal career, but also focuses on Phil Jackson's life philosophy--a combination of Zen Buddhism, Native American animist?

Overall, good for fans of Phil Jackson's work, but rather repetitive and presumptuous. The eleven championship-winning and the several unsuccessful runs are described at very high level. Jackson focuses on one, maybe two key momentsa match, a shotfor each.

What I liked here was the selection of the moment, which would have avoided most anyone not amidst the team, and the discussion about selling the job to the bunch of superstar, alpha characters in the team.

Jackson admits to mistakes and dissects his failures, and passes managerial judgment on many of his former players and associates. The technical discussion about the triangle offense, a trademark of Jackson's basketball strategyis unfortunately not developed enough and thus a let down. The philosophical part of the book is even more superficial and could perhaps have better been left out of this book entirely.

View 2 comments. Absolutely incredible book. I highly recommend it to anyone venturing into a leadership role or anyone that would like to further their thoughts on spirituality and it's role in building a team.

I can't say enough about how important this book has been for me at a very pivotal point in my career. View 1 comment. Jun 25, Lance rated it really liked it Shelves: He talks about what he had to do to take these teams that were loaded with talent and make them blend together into a cohesive team in order to win all those championships.

There are some aspects of leadership that books about business lead Review: There are some aspects of leadership that books about business leadership use. However, Jackson will put a unique spin on how he might use this model, so that it becomes clear that he is not doing this from a manual, but instead putting his own perspective and methods into the work he does with his teams.

He realized that one method will not work for everyone, and because his teams had so many superstars with egos to match their talent, he worked on each individual in methods to which the certain player would most respond positively.

I thought the best example of this was how Jackson handled a situation with Pippen during the playoffs, when the Bulls were playing without Jordan who had gone into his first retirement. Pippen was supposed to inbound a pass to Toni Kukoc for a last second shot in a playoff game against the New York Knicks. Pippen was not happy to have this role for the play and refused to leave the bench after a time out.

Jackson made a quick substitution for Pippen. Kukoc made the shot, the Bulls won the game, and the coaching staff decided on what to do about Pippen. It is stories like this, the manner in which Jackson treats his player and most importantly, how he articulates this in the book is why I believe this is a book that would be enjoyed by readers of all types, whether or not they are sports fans.

The personal stories in this book are refreshing, not judgmental, and a source of great information on some of the biggest names in basketball history. Excellent book. Did I skim? No Did I learn something new?

These passages delved much deeper than what was told in the media. Pace of the book: Very good. It moved along nicely and stayed in chronological order, which is something I appreciate. I also liked that it stuck mostly with basketball-related issues. At times, I found Jackson to come across as condescending toward other teams, players and coaches that may not have achieved the same level of success as he has achieved.

Not enough to be blatant or libelous but it does appear nonetheless. Do I recommend?

Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success Summary & Study Guide

Yes, especially for basketball fans. However, I think that fans of other sports and even some readers who may not be sports fans, but want to see how successful leaders build teams would like this book. Feb 01, Tim Larison rated it it was amazing Shelves: The Soul of Success was just the right book for me to read. Two of my passions are learning about spirituality and following professional sports. He tells stories of the star players he mentors, such as the Lakers Kobe Bryant.

Soon he was making an effort to connect more closely with his teammates and figure out how to forge them into a more cohesive team. His mother and father were Pentecostal Christian ministers, a path Jackson almost followed himself. He was initially reluctant to play for the Knicks as he wanted to go to graduate school to become a pastor. Eventually, I arrived at a synthesis that felt authentic to me.

The book is equally valuable in profiling the coach as a highly successful professional living his spirituality in everyday life. Mar 28, Fryeday rated it really liked it. I was very curious to read something about Phil because his nickname is Zen Master and that's something I desire to be whether in actuality or just perception of peers remains to be seen. I highlighted a lot in this book and I also saved numerous book titles to my "to-read" list.

So in that way, the book was completely worth it for me. I must say I kept thinking to myself "there's probably so much more he's not telling us. I definitely love the descriptions of how he meshes meditation, mindfulness practices, etc. I have personally noticed a huge difference in Kobe Bryant from when he came into the league and now and I definitely felt it was more than just getting older and Phil's book confirms that.

The book makes me want to know way more about him though. I'm interested to see how his children are, what his relationships with ex-wives are like. I'm nosy. I like that this book to me had just as much Buddhist philosophy as it did basketball.

It was a sheer treat! In a way, this book served its purpose because it helped demystifying the relationship between Phil Jackson's spiritual mumbo jumbo and his incredible success as an NBA coach to me. Of course it doesn't make sense to fans and bystanders, because we've never had anything at stake together.

Truth is, when you perform at that level, against such an insane level of opposition, you look for every possible edge you can gain on the opposition, by thinking differently and forming a collective consciousn In a way, this book served its purpose because it helped demystifying the relationship between Phil Jackson's spiritual mumbo jumbo and his incredible success as an NBA coach to me.

Truth is, when you perform at that level, against such an insane level of opposition, you look for every possible edge you can gain on the opposition, by thinking differently and forming a collective consciousness. Granted he has exceptional lineups especially during the Bulls' runs , Phil did that 11 times in 19 years. I thought it also was a testimony on the ephemeral nature of things. As good as Jackson's teams were, as dominant his legacies have been, he does a great job at illustrating how difficult success is to bear and how change is an integral part of legacies, although it doesn't assure it.

I don't think this is meant as a guide to young coaches or anything, but it's a statement that you have to find your own way to achieve the highest levels of success in life. Mar 03, Tony Zale rated it really liked it. The experience of watching the 90s Chicago Bulls defined my understanding of sport.

Year after year, we religiously watched the NBA playoffs. The poise of Michael Jordan and his supporting cast made victory feel inevitable. After each, we made a pilgrimage to a makeshift championship t-shirt stand in the ballroom of Skokie's Holiday Inn, returning with the latest"big head" or "ring" shirt design. Phil Jackson's reputation as "the zen master" solidified during this period, but my understanding of The experience of watching the 90s Chicago Bulls defined my understanding of sport.

Phil Jackson's reputation as "the zen master" solidified during this period, but my understanding of his philosophies were sketchy at best. At most, I recognized the absence of Ditka-like rants in press conferences and on the sidelines. Eleven Rings shows that was no mistake. Jackson asks players to focus on a few core ideas: He finds parallels between mindfulness and basketball that are both beautiful and ridiculous.

How often were the connections only realized in retrospect? I found myself not caring because his amusing anecdotes of interpersonal dynamics ring true. And it doesn't hurt that he clearly favors the Bulls over s Lakers. If you've been a basketball fan for the last 20 years, there isn't a lot of new material in this book from that perspective.

The stories of the evolution of the Bulls and Michael Jordan from one man band to dynasty, the squabbles of the Shaq-Kobe Lakers and then the renewal of the Kobe-Pau Lakers have been well documented.

However, what's most interesting about the book is gaining an insight into Phil Jackson's skills as a manager. This is a book more about teamwork, management, leadership and m If you've been a basketball fan for the last 20 years, there isn't a lot of new material in this book from that perspective. This is a book more about teamwork, management, leadership and massaging egos than basketball Xs and Os.

Even if you don't care about basketball, there is enough wisdom in those lessons to make this a worthwhile and quick read for anyone. Apr 16, Nick rated it liked it. Phil Jackson coached some of the NBA's greatest players Jordan and Kobe and some of its most mercurial Rodman but had unparalleled success by helping his teams find themselves. It's not clear how Jackson found his own spiritual calling, drawing from eastern philosophy and religion as well as Native American culture, but he channeled it to manage big egos.

You've got to be interested in detailed accounts of basketball games to love this book, but anyone interested in leadership can learn some Phil Jackson coached some of the NBA's greatest players Jordan and Kobe and some of its most mercurial Rodman but had unparalleled success by helping his teams find themselves. You've got to be interested in detailed accounts of basketball games to love this book, but anyone interested in leadership can learn something from it.

Nov 10, Justin Tapp rated it it was ok Shelves: There was much less about practical coaching and management wisdom than I hoped for in this book. It's not evident that Jackson is reading and learning from other management and leadership works himself, or other coaches other than those who have already been with him for years.

Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success – Phil Jackson (free ebook epub/mobi)

He quotes a few Buddhist works or proverbs but that's about it, so I found him to be pretty intellectually shallow despite being famous for giving his players books. Rather late in his career, after a few seasons with Kobe Bryant, Jackson writes he contacted a psychologist for advice.

The advice seemed superficial at best "focus on positive reinforcement" and Jackson didn't use it long. This kind of helter skelter application of shallow psychology doesn't strike me as very well-educated or thoughtful. Jackson learned a lot of his coaching from Red Holzman while playing for the Knicks. One lesson from Holzman was when asked the difference between winning and losing: Chop wood, carry water.

Jackson revels in breaking Holzman rival Red Auerbach's championship record. There are a few points Jackson makes up front about how he tried to instill teamwork into the Bulls and Lakers. One that stood out was: For example, Jackson has his teams stand in a circle before and after practice, everything in a circle. He calls the team area the "tribal room," etc. Sometimes he even led tense Laker teams in silent moments to synchronize their breath. He is famous for giving his players books on road trips, and he recounts which books he gave which players.

This practice has earned Jackson the reputation as being somehow book smart, whereas as I point out elsewhere that doesn't really seem to be the case. Generally, there doesn't appear much that sets apart Jackson from other coaches other than the rings. Having read books by other championship coaches I was interested to see if there were any lessons or daily principles they follow.

The only constant with Jackson appears to be meditation for stress relief and emotional regulation. But the meditation doesn't help his anger issues and he deals with years of repressed anger after his daughter is assaulted and Kobe Bryant is arrested on similar charges. His parents were Pentecostals who erroneously taught him that "anger was wrong" Jesus got angry plenty, after all , and this had harmful consequences for him.

Given some of his other behavior, I find his method of zen meditation rather unappealing and incomplete. He's had broken marriage, a range of ups and downs with his players and management, and I don't see any particular reason for his success other than acquiring big-market talent. Sometimes that talent agreed to work together and with him, at other times it didn't. He had issues with management at every stop.

One omission that stands out is any praise for other coaches like Gregg Popovich of the Spurs who consistently beat the Lakers with the non-flashy, team basketball that Jackson apparently espouses. But Popovich and co. The only coaches Jackson praises are those on teams that he beats, like the staff of Larry Bird's Pacers.

He clearly dislikes Pat Riley. He doesn't praise any of the teams that beat the ego-driven Lakers, or admit the contradiction of humbler teams dismantling his own. Last year I listened to Ronald Lazenby's biography of Michael Jordan, so I had a vivid picture in my mind of Jackson's years with the Bulls and was eager to hear his own take.

Jackson's version of those years is pretty scrubbed or wasn't much I hadn't heard before. Jackson inherited a Bulls team that was peaking under the greatest and most competitive player who ever lived. He doesn't have much negative to say about anyone in Chicago other than Jerry Krauss. In Lazenby's book, he claims from one of Phil's other books? The book infuriated Jordan and Jackson apparently had done so to motivate him. An assistant coach took the heat and got fired. Jackson simply writes in Eleven Rings that he tried to save the assistant coach.

Contra Lazenby's account, Jordan isn't found on the back of the team bus drinking beer with Ron Harper while relentlessly haranguing Krauss after games.

In Eleven Rings, it's Scottie Pippen who once gets drunk and tells off management. Jordan comes across as somewhat selfish, but is contrasted later as much more selfless than Kobe Bryant, who Jackson had a real feud with. Jackson recounts a funny story of a team manager assigned to watch Rodman during a road trip and the cross-country adventure he took him on.

In the end, the Bulls players hated their management and the management couldn't afford to pay them all. Jackson seems to have a difficult time communicating with his players, and on at least one occasion in the book an assistant pulls him aside to correct him.

Jackson provides no insights on how he chose his assistants other than Tex Winter , mentors them, delegates tasks, etc. They just exist in the background. Jackson plays the media against his players sometimes, leaking things or making side remarks to the media that enrage his players; Kobe made it a condition of playing for him in his last stint with the Lakers that he "be more discreet with the media.

Jackson's attempt to "bring the Buddha" to the Lakers for a championship is somewhat amusing but definitely not a magical experience. Kobe Bryant is vilified as an immature, selfish jerk. Then, later noted for being a good teammate and talking like someone who meditates and has found his inner self. Kobe admits that Phil is right and that he grew as a person. Then, we go back to Kobe the selfish jerk who yells at teammates to "give me the damn ball" and causes the team to self-destruct.

Jackson makes no secret of favoring Shaq, creating a rift between himself and Jerry Buss and Kobe Bryant by demanding they trade Kobe. This despite the fact that Shaq shows up overweight and out of shape every fall and takes half the season to get back to form every year, something Kobe couldn't stand.

After one year of working together, Shaq and Bryant decide they can't coexist. Jackson introduces Shaq to Sidartha to warn him away from materialism; an unrepentant Shaq writes a book report. Maybe as the last dig at Kobe, Jackson writes a paragraph comparing him with Michael Jordan. Jordan was stronger, making him a better defender and rebounder.

He was a less-selfish teammate and found other ways to help his team when his shot wasn't falling. He famously doesn't pass the ball if he wants his shot and doesn't play defense with any great intensity. Rick Fox apparently wrote that Kobe competes with himself and didn't behave the same way off the court as on, while MJ was competitive in everything non-stop. I give this book 2 stars out of 5. If you're an avid Lakers and Bulls fan you might want this book, but you've probably already read what's in it.

There are no great insights into managing a coaching staff or finding a way to maximize the strengths of your team to win if you don't have Hall of Fame talent on it. Oct 17, Bruce rated it really liked it Shelves: For those of you who don't follow basketball are there any of you out there?

Phil Jackson - Eleven Rings - The Soul of Success epub ebook.rar (4.1Mb)

As it's NBA tradition for owners to gift commemorative rings to the members of their championship teams, Eleven For those of you who don't follow basketball are there any of you out there? His memoir neatly integrates a play-the-hits sports autobiography with management philosophy.

Jackson provides only the skeleton of his personal life: Then again, his only purpose in doing so is to follow his influences and philosophical evolution. For example, we learn that he used sports to escape from the strictures of church-life but ended up devoted to basketball because of what he saw as its collective beauty, that a small group of close-knit people working together in harmony could overcome nearly any set of more talented individuals.

In basketball, as in life, Jackson finds cultivating an all-for-one selfless mentality to be the key to maximizing performance.

It's no mean trick. A lifelong learner, Jackson mentions various sources ranging from religious teachings Christianity, Sufism, Buddhism to coursework in psychology to the occasional seminar from Steven Covey, et al.