Ap advantage physics c pdf


 

Can someone send me a pdf of the AP advantage: physics c book. James Mooney has been a faculty member at The Taft School in Watertown, Connecticut, since , serving as physics instructor and science department. has anyone tried this book? I've heard good things about it but I'm reluctant to download cuz it costs 30 bucks If anyone bought this and can testify.

Author:VERDIE BEBOUT
Language:English, Spanish, Hindi
Country:New Zealand
Genre:Business & Career
Pages:410
Published (Last):30.03.2016
ISBN:657-3-50227-874-7
Distribution:Free* [*Registration Required]
Uploaded by: MARTY

65127 downloads 177795 Views 20.87MB PDF Size Report


Ap Advantage Physics C Pdf

AP Advantage: Physics C (optional) AP Physics C Summer Assignment: 1. please download this Physics with Calculus textbook pdf by Craig Fletcher. terney.info File Size: 58 kb AP Physics Class Information > Information about AP Physics C from the College Board click here. Textbook: Fundamentals of Physics by Halliday, Resnick, and Walker (8th edition ). Additional Books: AP Advantage: Physics C by Dr. James Mooney.

The following hand rules will be referred to. Forces from 1 and 4 cancel leaving both 3 and 4 B fields acting up and left and adding together. Based on RHRcurl the direction of that B field is into the page at that location. Charges moving through magnetic fields move in circles as in the diagram for question 39 E 4. Since compasses follow B field lines, the compass will also point right, which is east. To be undeflected, the electric and magnetic forces must balance. When cutting a magnet, you must end up with two new magnets having 2 poles each. For the top E magnet the current N and S must stay as is, so the left of center part becomes a S and the right of center part becomes a N.

Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, Volume 8, Number 15, 7 August - IOPscience

The panel strongly believes that all science courses at all levels—including advanced science courses in high schools—should include a significant component of experience with real-world phenomena and the way scientific conceptions are tested against observations of those phenomena.

The panel acknowledges that in practice, the interplay between theory and experiment is often complex. The important point is that science requires both components, and science instruction should reflect that interplay. At the advanced high school physics level, students should already have had considerable experience with these activities in earlier physics and physical science courses 6 in the form of laboratory exercises, demonstrations, and perhaps even independent investigations. The panel believes that advanced physics courses should provide additional experiences for students in formulating their own conjectures and explanations, as well as in making the connections between real-world phenomena and the concepts, principles, and theories developed by the scientific community.

What form should these additional real-world experiences take? In such cases, students may have no previous experience with laboratory physics, although it is highly likely that they will have laboratory experience in other sciences. It is the responsibility of the instructor to design the laboratory portion of his or her course to reflect prior student experience.

Page 11 Share Cite Suggested Citation:"2. Cookbook labs are mind-numbing experiences that lead students to describe their laboratory work as boring or a waste of time National Research Council, b. Indeed, in view of the fact that the time spent doing cookbook labs could be spent doing something more productive, it is doubtful that doing cookbook labs is better than doing no laboratory work at all.

The panel believes that the issue should be looked at from this point of view: What evidence is there that cookbook labs are of sufficient value to justify the enormous amount of time spent on them in physics programs across the nation?

As far as we know, no evidence comes anywhere close to justifying this huge investment of effort. Experimental work in advanced courses should provide experience with the way scientists use experiments—both for gathering data to build theoretical models and for exploring the applicability of these models to new situations. To that end, exploration of phenomena should generally precede and motivate the formal introduction of theoretical concepts.

Moreover, students should make as many scientific decisions as possible, from the conception and design of the experiment all the way through the analysis, presentation, and critical review of the results.

The panel urges teachers of advanced physics courses to consider using a wide range of experiences, including the following: Open-ended labs that require students to make decisions about what to observe, how to observe it, and how to interpret the data Labs that focus on allowing students to confront preconceptions and reconcile them with actual observations, with less emphasis on numerical data acquisition and analysis Demonstrations that encourage students to predict what is going to happen and then follow up with discussion that reconciles predictions and observations Take-home labs that can be done with relatively simple equipment and everyday items Exercises that work with data available on the Internet e.

The hope was expressed that AP Physics students would rapidly progress to higher levels in which they would take increasing responsibility for the design and analysis of experiments.

Page 12 Share Cite Suggested Citation:"2.

Both the College Board and the IBO provide lists of labs that are commonly used in advanced secondary school physics courses, as well as in introductory college and university physics courses. Those lists can serve as a rough guide for teachers, although innovation is certainly to be encouraged.

The teacher might then ask what measurements should be carried out to test that idea, and how well those measurements can be used to reject or confirm the idea.

Still better would be a lab in which students would play with some pendulums first, and then themselves come up with questions to ask about pendulum motion. Scoring well on a final examination is a tangible goal that both students and teachers can strive to achieve.

Success on such examinations leads to feelings of triumph and looks good on college applications. Because of the high stakes involved, it is too often the assessments, rather than educational goals, that drive the instructional process. A prime example is the AP Physics B examination with its vast coverage of subject matter see Chapter 3. In view of this fact, it is imperative that the assessments used accurately measure depth of understanding, the primary goal of advanced physics instruction.

Unless the assessments encourage and reward students and teachers for exploring physics deeply in the ways described above, they will not do so; instead, they will do what is necessary to score well on the assessments. Ensuring that tests emphasize conceptual understanding is an important way to encourage better teaching practices.

Useful Resources for Developing Real-World Experiences Although by no means exhaustive, the following is a list of some resources that members of the panel have found particularly helpful in developing meaningful real-world experiences.

More information about many of these resources is given in Chapter 4 : Edge, R.

Table of contents

String and Sticky Tape Experiments. Sokoloff, D. Laws, and R. Real Time Physics: active learning laboratories: mechanics. Medford, MA: Tufts University. Real Time Physics: active learning laboratories: electric circuits. Electric and Magnetic Interactions.

New York : Wiley. Steinber, M. Physics Teacher, 31, In the next section, we offer some general recommendations for creating desirable written examinations. Written examinations are the most practical means of assessing the performance of a large number of candidates, but are certainly not the only means.

Designing Good Written Examinations A good written examination in an advanced physics program should: Emphasize conceptual questions, rather than mathematical techniques. Here we are not distinguishing questions that are conceptual from those that are mathematical; conceptual questions may well involve mathematics.

Rather, we are distinguishing questions that assess conceptual understanding from those that assess mainly technical mathematical skill. The goal of an advanced course is not just to provide the correct answer, but also to communicate the reasoning process that leads to that answer. Page 14 Share Cite Suggested Citation:"2. Instead, shorter questions that call for original reasoning in a complex unfamiliar setting are desirable. Open-ended questions posed in a real-life setting can help strengthen the connection between physics and the world around us, and are thus recommended.

Construct multiple-choice questions that reflect common student misconceptions. Research is required to determine adequate distracters incorrect multiple-choice answers.

Ideally these distracters should be obtained from answers given previously by students to free-response questions. Additional improvements include multiple-choice questions that have more than one correct answer multiple-completion questions and multiple-choice questions that require not only the selection of a correct answer, but also the selection of a correct justification.

Allow sufficient time for most well-prepared students to complete every question. Emphasis must be placed on what a student knows—not how quickly the student can recall and use that knowledge.

Many alternative forms of assessment exercises exist, and some of these have been shown to be valuable. For example, students could be asked to score or rank a number of student solutions to a free-response question. Such an exercise would require not only understanding the question posed, but also distinguishing among different models and recognizing the correct one. Written examinations cannot accurately assess laboratory skills, and should not attempt to do so. However, questions involving analysis and interpretation of data are both reasonable and desirable.

In addition, students can be asked to outline the design of simple experiments based on their general knowledge. Since there is no required list of experiments that all students must perform, such questions must not depend too strongly on the specifics of any particular experimental technique.

The key advantage of the CAP concept is that it would bring together many existing programs rather than having them continually reinvented by different groups. Most current curriculum projects that would be suitable for submission to the CAP already have teacher training provisions.

The CAP would add nationally recognized certification of quality and disseminate certified curricula to schools across the nation. Inclusion of Meaningful, Challenging, Real-World Experiences Science at its heart is the process of how we come to know about and understand the physical world around us, including how living things interact with and are part of that world.

What distinguishes science from other ways of thinking is reliance on evidence about the physical world and the importance of reproducible, principled consistency in judging the truth and utility of conjectures, laws, and theories. The panel strongly believes that all science courses at all levels—including advanced science courses in high schools—should include a significant component of experience with real-world phenomena and the way scientific conceptions are tested against observations of those phenomena.

The panel acknowledges that in practice, the interplay between theory and experiment is often complex. The important point is that science requires both components, and science instruction should reflect that interplay. At the advanced high school physics level, students should already have had considerable experience with these activities in earlier physics and physical science courses 6 in the form of laboratory exercises, demonstrations, and perhaps even independent investigations.

The panel believes that advanced physics courses should provide additional experiences for students in formulating their own conjectures and explanations, as well as in making the connections between real-world phenomena and the concepts, principles, and theories developed by the scientific community. What form should these additional real-world experiences take? In such cases, students may have no previous experience with laboratory physics, although it is highly likely that they will have laboratory experience in other sciences.

It is the responsibility of the instructor to design the laboratory portion of his or her course to reflect prior student experience. Page 11 Share Cite Suggested Citation:"2.

Cookbook labs are mind-numbing experiences that lead students to describe their laboratory work as boring or a waste of time National Research Council, b. Indeed, in view of the fact that the time spent doing cookbook labs could be spent doing something more productive, it is doubtful that doing cookbook labs is better than doing no laboratory work at all.

The panel believes that the issue should be looked at from this point of view: What evidence is there that cookbook labs are of sufficient value to justify the enormous amount of time spent on them in physics programs across the nation? As far as we know, no evidence comes anywhere close to justifying this huge investment of effort. Experimental work in advanced courses should provide experience with the way scientists use experiments—both for gathering data to build theoretical models and for exploring the applicability of these models to new situations.

To that end, exploration of phenomena should generally precede and motivate the formal introduction of theoretical concepts. Moreover, students should make as many scientific decisions as possible, from the conception and design of the experiment all the way through the analysis, presentation, and critical review of the results.

The panel urges teachers of advanced physics courses to consider using a wide range of experiences, including the following: Open-ended labs that require students to make decisions about what to observe, how to observe it, and how to interpret the data Labs that focus on allowing students to confront preconceptions and reconcile them with actual observations, with less emphasis on numerical data acquisition and analysis Demonstrations that encourage students to predict what is going to happen and then follow up with discussion that reconciles predictions and observations Take-home labs that can be done with relatively simple equipment and everyday items Exercises that work with data available on the Internet e.

The hope was expressed that AP Physics students would rapidly progress to higher levels in which they would take increasing responsibility for the design and analysis of experiments. Page 12 Share Cite Suggested Citation:"2. Both the College Board and the IBO provide lists of labs that are commonly used in advanced secondary school physics courses, as well as in introductory college and university physics courses.

Those lists can serve as a rough guide for teachers, although innovation is certainly to be encouraged.

The teacher might then ask what measurements should be carried out to test that idea, and how well those measurements can be used to reject or confirm the idea. Still better would be a lab in which students would play with some pendulums first, and then themselves come up with questions to ask about pendulum motion.

Scoring well on a final examination is a tangible goal that both students and teachers can strive to achieve. Success on such examinations leads to feelings of triumph and looks good on college applications. Because of the high stakes involved, it is too often the assessments, rather than educational goals, that drive the instructional process.

A prime example is the AP Physics B examination with its vast coverage of subject matter see Chapter 3. In view of this fact, it is imperative that the assessments used accurately measure depth of understanding, the primary goal of advanced physics instruction.

Unless the assessments encourage and reward students and teachers for exploring physics deeply in the ways described above, they will not do so; instead, they will do what is necessary to score well on the assessments.

Ensuring that tests emphasize conceptual understanding is an important way to encourage better teaching practices.

Useful Resources for Developing Real-World Experiences Although by no means exhaustive, the following is a list of some resources that members of the panel have found particularly helpful in developing meaningful real-world experiences. More information about many of these resources is given in Chapter 4 : Edge, R. String and Sticky Tape Experiments.

Sokoloff, D. Laws, and R. Real Time Physics: active learning laboratories: mechanics. Medford, MA: Tufts University. Real Time Physics: active learning laboratories: electric circuits. Electric and Magnetic Interactions. New York : Wiley. Steinber, M. Physics Teacher, 31, In the next section, we offer some general recommendations for creating desirable written examinations.

Written examinations are the most practical means of assessing the performance of a large number of candidates, but are certainly not the only means. Designing Good Written Examinations A good written examination in an advanced physics program should: Emphasize conceptual questions, rather than mathematical techniques.

Here we are not distinguishing questions that are conceptual from those that are mathematical; conceptual questions may well involve mathematics. Rather, we are distinguishing questions that assess conceptual understanding from those that assess mainly technical mathematical skill. The goal of an advanced course is not just to provide the correct answer, but also to communicate the reasoning process that leads to that answer.

Page 14 Share Cite Suggested Citation:"2.

AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

Instead, shorter questions that call for original reasoning in a complex unfamiliar setting are desirable. Open-ended questions posed in a real-life setting can help strengthen the connection between physics and the world around us, and are thus recommended.

Construct multiple-choice questions that reflect common student misconceptions. Research is required to determine adequate distracters incorrect multiple-choice answers.

AP physics C

Ideally these distracters should be obtained from answers given previously by students to free-response questions. Additional improvements include multiple-choice questions that have more than one correct answer multiple-completion questions and multiple-choice questions that require not only the selection of a correct answer, but also the selection of a correct justification.

Allow sufficient time for most well-prepared students to complete every question. Emphasis must be placed on what a student knows—not how quickly the student can recall and use that knowledge. Many alternative forms of assessment exercises exist, and some of these have been shown to be valuable. For example, students could be asked to score or rank a number of student solutions to a free-response question.

Related articles:


Copyright © 2019 terney.info. All rights reserved.
DMCA |Contact Us