The Devi Māhātmyam is one of the foremost texts in the Worship of the Goddess, It is recommended to read the Devi Māhātmyam every day during Navaratri. the glory of the Mother, Lalita sahasranamam and Devi Mahatmyam are most Bhandasura, the Devi Mahatmyam describes the victory of the Goddess over the . You are the embodiment of the threefold matra, the Om sound. ardha-mātrā sthitā nityā yā an-uccaryā a-visesatah, tvam eva sā tvam sāvitri tvam devi-janani.

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Devi Mahatmyam Pdf

(Sathvic-spiritual) is known as Devi Mahatmya in South India, Chandi in West Bengal Devi Mahatmya is a story but each of its slokas is considered as mantras. wonderful traits of the Veda, the Kalpa tree, this S'rimad Bhâgavata with its numerous stories file:///D|/webgetdown/ Devi Mahatmyam - Indian stotras, from . Devi Mahatmyam English terney.info - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf) , Text File .txt) or view presentation slides online.

Mackenzie Brown, is both a culmination of centuries of Indian ideas about the divine feminine, as well as a foundation for the literature and spirituality focussed on the feminine transcendence in centuries that followed. Thus, it can be concluded that the text was composed before the 7th century CE. The saguna forms of her, asserts the text, are Mahakali destroyer, Tamasic , Mahalakshmi sustainer, Rajasic and Mahasaraswati creator, Sattvic , [34] which as a collective are called Tridevi. The nirguna concept Avyakrita, transcendent is also referred to as Maha-lakshmi. At the beginning of each episode a different presiding goddess is invoked, none of whom is mentioned in the text itself. The sage instructs by recounting three different epic battles between the Devi and various demonic adversaries the three tales being governed by the three Tridevi , respectively, Mahakali Chapter 1 , Mahalakshmi Chapters , and Mahasaraswati Chapters Most famous is the story of Mahishasura Mardini — Devi as "Slayer of the Buffalo Demon" — one of the most ubiquitous images in Hindu art and sculpture, and a tale known almost universally in India.

Of these battalions, some beat drums, some blew conches and others played on tabors in that great martial festival. Then the Devi killed hundreds of asuras with her trident, club, showers of spears, swords and the like, and threw down others who were stupefied by the noise of her bell; and binding others with her noose, she dragged them on the ground. Some were split into two by the sharp slashes of her sword, and others, smashed by the blows of her mace, lay down on the ground; and some severely hammered by club vomited forth blood.

Pierced in the breast by her trident, some fell on the ground. Pierced all over by her arrows and resembling porcupines, some of the enemies of devas gave up their lives on that field of battle.

Some had their arms cut off, some, their necks broken the heads of others rolled down; some others were torn asunder in the middle of their trunks, and some great asuras fell on the ground with their legs severed. Some rendered one-armed, one-eyed, and one-legged were again clove in twain by the Devi.

And others, though rendered headless, fell and rose again. Headless trunks fought with the Devi with best weapons in their hands. Some of these headless trunks danced there in the battle to the rhythm of the musical instruments. The trunks of some other great asuras, with their swords, spears and lances still in their hands, shouted at the Devi with their just severed heads, 'Stop, stop'.

That part of earth where the battle was fought became impassable with the asuras, elephants and horses and chariots that had been felled.

The profuse blood from the asuras, elephants and horses flowed immediately like large rivers amidst that army of the asuras.

As fire consumes a huge heap of straw and wood, so did Ambika destroy that vast army of asuras in no time. And her carrier-lion, thundering aloud with quivering mane, prowled about in the battlefield, appearing to search out the vital breaths from the bodies of the enemies of devas.

In that battlefield the battalions of the Devi fought in such a manner with the asuras that the devas in heaven, showering flowers, extolled them. Here ends the second chapter called 'Slaughter of the armies of Mahis h asura' of Devi-mahatmya in Markandeya-purana, during the period of Savarni, the Manu.

The Slaying of Mahis h asura. Then Ciksura, the great asura general, seeing that army being slain by the Devi , advanced in anger to fight with Ambika. That asura rained showers of arrows on the Devi in the battle, even as a cloud showers rain on the summit of Mount Meru. Then the Devi, easily cutting asunder the masses of his arrows, killed his horses and their controller with her arrows. Forthwith she split his bow and lofty banner, and with her arrows pierced the body of that asura whose bow had been cut.

His bow shattered, his chariot broken, his horses killed and his charioteer slain, the asura armed with sword and shield rushed at the Devi.

The Glory of the Goddess-Devi Mahatmyam

Swiftly he smote the lion on the head with his sharp-edged sword and struck the Devi also on her left arm. O king, his sword broke into pieces as it touched her arm. Thereon his eyes turning red with anger, he grasped his pike. Then the great asura flung at Bhandrakali the pike, blazing with lustre, as if he was hurling the very sun from the skies.

Seeing that pike coming upon her, the Devi hurled her pike that shattered his pike into a hundred fragments and the great asura himself. Mahisasura's very valiant general having been killed, Camara, the afflicter of devas, mounted on an elephant, advanced.

He also hurled his spear at the Devi. Ambika quickly assailed it with a whoop, made it lustreless and fall to the ground.

Seeing his spear broken and fallen, Camara, full of rage, flung a pike, and she split that also with her arrows. Then the lion, leaping up and seating itself at the centre of the elephant's forehead, engaged itself in a hand to hand fight with that foe of the devas.

Fighting, the two then came down to the earth from the back of the elephant, and fought very impetuously, dealing the most terrible blows at each other. Then the lion, springing up quickly to the sky, and descending, severed Camara's head with a blow from its paw. And Udagra was killed in the battle by the Devi with stones, trees and the like, and Karala also stricken down by her teeth and fists and slaps. Enraged, the Devi ground Uddhata to powder with the blows of her club, and killed Baskala with a dart and destroyed Tamra and Andhaka with arrows.

With her sword she struck down Bidala's head from his body, and dispatched both Durdhara and Durmudha to the abode of Death with her arrows. As his army was thus being destroyed, Mahis h asura terrified the troops of the Devi with his own buffalo form. Some he laid low by a blow of his muzzle, some by stamping with his hooves, some by the lashes of his tail, and others by the pokes of his horns.

Some he laid low on the face of the earth by his impetuous speed, some by his bellowing and wheeling movement, and others by the blast of his breath. Having laid low her army, Mahis h asura rushed to slay the lion of the Mahadevi. This enraged Ambika. Mahis h asura, great in valour, pounded the surface of the earth with his hooves in rage, tossed up the high mountains with his horns, and bellowed terribly.

Crushed by the velocity of his wheeling, the earth disintegrated, and lashed by his tail, the sea overflowed all around. Pierced by his swaying horns, the clouds went into fragments. Cast up by the blast of his breath, mountains fell down from the sky in hundreds.

Seeing the great asura swollen with rage and advancing towards her, Chandika displayed her wrath in order to slay him. She flung her noose over him and bound the great asura. Thus bound in the great battle, he quitted his buffalo form. Then he became a lion suddenly. While Ambika cut off the head of his lion form , he took the appearance of a man with sword in hand.

Immediately then the Devi with her arrows chopped off the man together with his sword and shield. Then he became a big elephant. The elephant tugged at her great lion with his trunk and roared loudly, but as he was dragging, the Devi cut off his trunk with her sword. The great asura then resumed his buffalo shape and shook the three worlds with their movable and immovable objects. Enraged threat, Chandika, the Mother of the worlds, quaffed a divine drink again and again, and laughed, her eyes becoming red.

And she with showers of arrows pulverized those mountains hurled at her, and spoke to him in flurried words, the colour of her face accentuated with the intoxication of the divine drink. The Devi said: When you sill be slain by me, the devas will soon roar in this very place. Having exclaimed thus, she jumped and landed herself on that great asura, pressed him on the neck with her foot and struck him with her spear.

And thereupon, caught up under her foot. Mahis h asura half issued forth in his real form from his own buffalo mouth, being completely overcome by the valour of the Devi. Fighting thus with his half-revealed form, the great asura was laid by the Devi who struck off his head with her great sword. Then, crying in consternation, the whole asura army perished; and all the hosts of deva were in exultation. With the great sages of heaven, the devas praised the Devi.

The Gandharva chiefs sang and the bevies of apsaras danced. Here ends the third chapter called 'The Slaying of Mahis h asura' of Devi-mahatmya in Markandeya-purana during the period of Savarni, the Manu.

The Devi Stuti. When that most valiant but evil-natured Mahis h asura and the army of that foe of the devas were destroyed by the Devi, Indra and the hosts of devas uttered their words of praise, their necks and shoulders reverently bent, and bodies rendered beautiful with horripilation and exultation. May she grant us auspicious things!

May you protect the universe! Though you are possessed of the three gunas you are not known to have any of their attendant defects like passion!

You are incomprehensible even to Vishnu, Shiva and others! You are the resort of all! You are verily the supreme primordial Prakriti untransformed. You are the Svadha which gives satisfaction to the manes. Therefore you are chanted as Svaha and Svadha in Sacrifices by people. You the supreme knowledge are cultivated by sages desiring liberation, whose senses are well restrained, who are devoted to Reality, and have shed all the blemishes.

You are the repository of the very pure Rig-veda and Yajus hymns, and of Samans, the recital of whose words is beautiful sith the Udgitha! You are Bhagavati embodying the three Vedas. And you are the sustenance whereby life is maintained. You are the supreme destroyer of the pain of al the worlds. You are Durga, the boat that takes men across the difficult ocean of worldly existence, devoid of attachments.

You are Shri who has invariably taken her abode in the heart of Vishnu. You are indeed Gauri who has established herself with Shiva. Yet it was very strange that, being swayed by anger, Mahis h asura suddenly struck your face when he saw it.

For, who can live after beholding the enraged Destroyer? You are Supreme. If enraged, you forthwith destroy the asura families for the welfare of the world. This was known the very moment when the extensive forces of Mahis h asura were brought to their end.

Are you not, therefore O Devi, the bestower of reward in all the three worlds? When called to mind by those in happiness, you bestow a mind still further pious.

Which goddess but you, O Dispeller of poverty, pain and fear, has an ever sympathetic heart for helping everyone? But you direct your weapons against them so that even the inimical ones, purified by the missiles, may attain the higher worlds.

Such is your most kindly intention towards them. Where can one find this beauty of yours most charming, yet striking fear in enemies? Compassion in heart and relentlessness in battle are een, O Devi, O Bestower of boons, only in you in all the three worlds! Having killed them in the battle-front, you have led even those hosts of enemies to heaven, and you have dispelled our fear from the frenzied enemies of the devas. Salutation to you! O Ambika, protect us with your sword, protect us by the sound of your bell and by the twang of your bow-string.

O Iswari! Thus the supporter of the worlds was praised by the devas, worshipped with celestial flowers that blossomed in Nandana and with perfumes and unguents; and with devotion all of them offered her - heavenly incense. Benignly serene in countenance she spoke to all obeisant devas. Gratified immensely with these hymns, I grant it with great pleasure ' The devas said: O King, being thus propitiated by the devas for the sake of the world and for their own sake, Bhadrakali said, 'Be it so' and vanished from their sight.

Thus have I narrated, O King, how the Devi who desires the good of all the three worlds made her appearance of yore out of the bodies of the devas. And again how, as a benefactress of the devas, she appeared in the form of Gauri for the slaying of wicked asuras as well as S h umbha and Nis h umbha, and for the protection of worlds, listen as I relate it. I shall tell it to you as it happened.

Here ends the fourth chapter called "The Devi Stuti " of the Devi-mahatmya in Markandeya-purana during the period of Savarni, the Manu. Devi's conversation with the messenger. Meditation of Mahasaraswati I meditate on the incomparable Mahasaraswati who holds in her eight lotus-like hands bell, trident, plough, conch, mace, discus, bow and arrow; who is effulgent like destroyer of Sumbha and other asuras, who issued forth from Parvati's body and is the substratum of the three worlds.

Of yore Indra's sovereignty over the three worlds and his portions of the sacrifices were taken away by the asuras, Sumbha and Nisumbha, by force of their pride and strength.

The two, themselves, took over likewise, the offices of the sun, the moon, Kubera, Yama, and Varuna. They themselves exercised Vayu's authority and Agni's duty. Deprived of their lordships and sovereignties, the devas were defeated. Deprived of their functions and expelled by these two great asuras, all the devas thought of the invincible Devi. Resolving thus, the devas went to Himavat, lord of the mountains, and there extolled the Devi, who is the illusive power of Vishnu.

The devas said: Salutation always to her who is ever auspicious. Salutation to her who is the primordial cause and the sustaining power. With attention, we have made obeisance to her. Salutation to Gauri, the supporter of the Universe. Salutation to the consort of Shiva who is herself the good fortune as well as misfortune of kings.

Salutation to her who is the support of the world. Salutation to the devi who is the form of volition. O Prince, while the devas were thus engaged in praises and other acts of adoration , Parvathi came there to bathe in the waters of the Ganga. She, the lovely-browed, said to those devas, 'Who is praised by you here? Because that Ambika came out of Parvati's physical sheath Kosa , she is glorified as Kaushiki in all the worlds.

After she had issued forth, Parvati became dark and was called Kalika and stationed on mount Himalaya. Then, C h anda, and Munda, two servants of S h umbha and Nis h umbha, saw that Ambika Kausiki bearing a surpassingly charming form.

They both told S h umbha: Ascertain who that Goddess is and take possession of her, O Lord of the asuras! You should see her. It has been brought here from Brahma to whom it originally belonged.

And the ocean gave a garland named Kinjalkini made of unfading lotus flowers. And here is the excellent chariot that was formerly Prajapati's. By you, O Lord, Death's shakti weapon named Utkrantida has been carried off. Fire also gave you two garments which are purified by fire. Why this beautiful lady-jewel is not seized by you? On hearing these words of Chanda and Munda, S h umbha sent the great asura Sugriva as messenger to the Devi.

He said: He went there where the Devi was staying in a very beautiful spot on the mountain and spoke to her in fine and sweet words. The messenger said: Sent by him as messenger, I have come here to your presence. I enjoy all their hares in sacrifices separately.

The devas themselves offered to me with salutations that gem of horses named Uccaisravas which arose at the churning of milk-ocean. You who are such, come to me, since we are the enjoyers of the best objects.

Think over this in your mind, and become my wife. Thus told, Durga the adorable and auspicious, by whom this universe is supported, then became serene and said.

You have spoken truth; nothing false has been uttered by you in this matter.

Durga Sapta Shlokee and Devi Mahatmyam

S h umbha is indeed the sovereign of the three worlds an likewise is also Nis h umbha. Hear what promise I had made already out of foolishness. Vanquishing me here, let him soon take my hand in marriage. Why delay? Talk not so before me. Which man in the three worlds will stand before S h umbha and Nis h umbha?

Why mention you, O Devi, a single woman? Let it not be that you go to them with your dignity lost be being dragged by your hair. What can I do since there stands my ill-considered vow taken long ago? The Slaying of Dhumraloc h ana. The messenger, filled with indignation on hearing the words the Devi, returned and related them in detail to the king of the daityas. Then the asura monarch, enraged on hearing that report from his messenger, told Dhumralocana, a chieftain of the daityas: Then the asura Dhuralocana, commanded thus by S h umbha, went forth quickly, accompanied by sixty thousand asuras.

On seeing the Devi stationed on the snowy mountain, he asked her aloud, 'Come to the presence of S h umbha and Nis h umbha. If you thus take me by force, then what can I do to you? Thus told, the asura Dhumralocana rushed towards her and thereupon Ambika reduced him to ashes with a mere heave of the sound 'hum'. Then the great army of asuras became enraged and showered on Ambika sharp arrows, javelins, and axes. Then the lion, vehicle of the Devi, shaking its mane in anger, and making the most terrific roar, fell on the army of the asuras.

Some asuras, it slaughtered with a blow of its fore paw, others with its mouth, and other great asuras, by treading over with its hind legs. The lion, with its claws, tore out the hearts of some and severed heads with a blow of the paw. And it severed arms and heads from others, and shaking its mane drank the blood from the hearts of others. In a moment all that army was destroyed by that high-spirited and exceedingly enraged lion who bore the Devi.

When S h umbha, the lord of asuras, heard that asura Dhumralocana was slain by the Devi and all his army was destroyed by the lion of the Devi, he was infuriated, his lip quivered and he commanded the two mighty asuras Chanda and Munda: But if you have any doubt about doing that, then let the asuras strike her in the fight with all their weapons. The slaying of Chanda and Munda. Then at his command the asuras, fully armed, and with Chanda and Munda at their head, marched in fourfold array.

They saw the Devi, smiling gently, seated upon the lion on a huge golden peak of the great mountain. On seeing her, some of them excited themselves and made an effort to capture her, and others approached her, with their bows bent and swords drawn.

Thereupon Ambika became terribly angry with those foes, and in her anger her countenance then became dark as ink.

Out from the surface of her forehead, fierce with frown, issued suddenly Kali of terrible countenance, armed with a sword and noose. Bearing the strange skull-topped staff, decorated with a garland of skull, clad in a tiger's skin, very appalling owing to her emaciated flesh, with gaping mouth, fearful with her tongue lolling out, having deep-sunk reddish eyes and filling the regions of the sky with her roars, and falling upon impetuously and slaughtering the great asuras in that army, she devoured those hosts of the foes of the devas.

Snatching the elephants with one hand she flung them into her mouth together with their rear men and drivers and their warrior-riders and bells. Taking likewise into her mouth the cavalry with the horses, and chariot with its driver, she ground them most frightfully with her teeth.

She seized one by the hair and another by the neck; one she crushed by the weight of the foot, and another of her body. And she caught with her mouth the weapons and the great arms shot by those asuras and crunched them up with her teeth in her fury. She destroyed all that host of mighty and evil-natured asuras, devoured some and battered others. Some were killed with her word, some were beaten with her skull-topped staff, and other asuras met their death being ground with the edge of her teeth.

On seeing all the hosts of asuras laid low in a moment, Chanda rushed against that Kali, who was exceedingly terrible. The great asura Chanda with very terrible showers of arrows, and Munda with discuses hurled in thousands covered that terrible-eyed Devi. Those numerous discuses, disappearing into her mouth, looked like numerous solar orbs disappearing into the midst of a cloud. Thereat Kali, who was roaring frightfully, whose fearful teeth were gleaming within her dreadful mouth, laughed terribly with exceeding fury.

DEVI MAHATMYA eng

Then the Devi, mounting upon her great lion, rushed at Chanda, and seizing him by his hair, severed his head with her sword. Seeing Chanda laid low, Munda also rushed at her. She felled him also the ground, striking him with her sword in her fury. Seeing the most valiant Chanda and Munda laid low, the remaining army there became panicky and fled in all directions. And Kali, holding the heads of Chanda and Munda in her hands, approached Chandika and said, her words mingled with very loud laughter.

Thereupon seeing those asuras, Chanda and Munda brought to her, the auspicious Chandika said to Kali these playful words: Here ends the seventh chapter called 'The slaying of Chanda and Munda' of Devi-mahatmya in Markandeya purana, during the period of Savarni, the Manu. The Slaying of Raktabija.

After the daitya Chanda was slain and Munda was laid low, and many of the battalions were destroyed, the lord of the asuras, powerful Sumbha, with mid overcome by anger, commanded then the mobilization of all the daitya hosts: After issuing these orders, Sumbha, the lord of the asuras and a ferocious ruler, went forth, attended by many thousands of big forces.

Seeing that most terrible army coming, Chandika filled into space between the earth and the sky with the twang of her bow-string. Thereon her lion made an exceedingly loud roar, O King, and Ambika magnified those roars with the clanging of the bell. Kali, expanding her mouth wide and filling the quarters with the sound hum overwhelmed the noises of her bow-string, lion and bell by her terrific roars. On hearing that roar the enraged asura battalions surrounded the lion, the Devi Chandika and Kali on all the four sides.

At this moment, O King, in order to annihilate the enemies of devas and for the well-being of the supreme devas, there issued forth, endowed with exceeding vigour and strength, Shaktis from the bodies of Brahma, Shiva, Guha, Vishnu and Indra, and with the form of those devas went to Chandika. Whatever was the form of each deva, whatever his ornaments and vehicle, in that very form his Shakti advanced to fight with the asuras.

In a heavenly chariot drawn by swans advanced Brahma's Shakti carrying a rosary and Kamandalu. She is called Brahmani. Maheshvari arrived, seated on a bull, holding a fine trident, wearing bracelets of great snakes and adorned with a digit of the moon.

Ambika Kaumari, in the form of Guha, holding a spear in hand riding on a fine peacock, advanced to attack the asuras. Likewise the Shakti of Vishnu came, seated upon Garuda, holding conch, club, bow and sword in hand. The Shakti of Hari, who assumed the incomparable form of a sacrificial boar, she also advanced there in a boar-like form. Naras i mhi arrived there, assuming a body like that of a Narasimha, bringing down the constellations by the toss of her mane.

Likewise the thousand-eyed Aindri, holding a thunderbolt in hand and riding on the lord of elephants arrive just like Sakra Indra. Then Shiva, surrounded by those shaktis of the devas, said to Chandika, 'Let the asuras be killed forthwith by you for my gratification. Thereupon from the body of Devi issued forth the Shakti of Chandika, most terrific, exceedingly fierce and yelling like a hundred jackals.

And that invincible Shakti told Shiva, of dark coloured matted locks, 'Go, my lord, as ambassador to the presence of S h umbha and Nis umbha. You go to the nether world, if you wish to live. Let my jackals be satiated with your flesh. Because that Devi appointed "Shiva" himself as ambassador thenceforth she became renowned in this world as Shiva-duti.

Those great asuras, on their part, hearing the words of the Devi communicated by Shiva, were filled with indignation and went where Katyayani stood. Then in the very beginning, the enraged foes of the devas poured in front on the Devi showers of arrows, javelins and spears. And lightly, with the huge arrows shot from her full-drawn bow, she clove those arrows, spears, darts and axes hurled by them. Then, in front of him S h umbha , stalked Kali, piercing the enemies to pieces with her spear and crushing them with her skull-topped staff.

And Brahmani, wherever she moved, made the enemies bereft of valour and prowess by sprinkling on them the water from her Kamandalu. The very wrathful Maheshvari slew the daityas with her trident, and Vaisnavi, with her discus and Kaumari, with her javelin.

Torn to pieces by the thunderbolt which come down upon them, hurled by Aindri, daityas and danavas fell on the earth in hundreds, streams of blood flowing out of them. Shattered by the boar-formed goddess Varahi with blows of her snout, wounded in their chests by the point of her tusk and torn by her discus, the asuras fell down. Naras i mhi filling all the quarters and the sky with her roars, roamed about in the battle, devouring other great asuras torn by her claws. Demoralised by the violent laughter of Shivaduti, the asuras fell down on the earth; she then devoured them who had fallen down.

Seeing the enraged band of Matrs crushing the great asuras thus by various means, the troops of the enemies of devas took to their heels. Seeing the asuras harassed by the band of Matrs and fleeing, the great asura Raktabija strode forward to fight in wrath. Whenever from his body there fell to the ground a drop of blood, at that moment rose up from the earth asura of his stature. The great asura fought with Indra's shakti with club in his hand; then Aindri also struck Ranktabija with her thunderbolt.

Blood flowed quickly and profusely from him who was wounded by the thunderbolt. From the blood rose up fresh combatants of his form and valour. As many drops of blood fell from his body, so may persons came into being, with his courage, strength and valour. And those persons also sprung up from his blood fought there with the Matrs in a more dreadful manner hurling the very formidable weapons. And again when his head was wounded by the fall of her thunder-bolt, his blood flowed and there from were born persons in thousands.

Vaisnavi struck him with her discus in the battle, Aindri beat that lord of asuras with her club. The world was pervaded by thousands of great asuras who were of his stature and who rose up from the blood that flowed from him when cloven by the discus of Vaisnavi.

Kaumari struck the great asura Raktabija with her spear, Varahi with her sword, and Mahesvari with her trident. And Raktabija, that great asura also, filled with wrath, struck everyone of the Matrs severally with his club. From the stream of blood which fell on the earth from him when he received multiple wounds by the spears, darts and other weapons, hundreds of asuras came into being.

And those asuras that were born from the blood of Raktabija pervaded the whole world; the devas got intensely alarmed at this. Seeing the devas dejected, Chandika laughed and said to Kali, 'O Chamunda, open out your mouth wide; with this mouth quickly take in the drops of blood generated by the blow of my weapon and also the great asuras born of the drops of blood of Raktabija.

So shall this daitya, with his blood emptied, perish. Then Kali drank Raktabija's blood with her mouth. Then and there he struck Chandika with his club. The blow of his club caused her not even the slightest pain. And from his stricken body wherever blood flowed copiously, there Chamunda swallowed it with her mouth.

The Chamunda devoured those great asuras who sprang up from the flow of blood in her mouth, and drank his Raktabija's blood. The Devi Kausiki smote Raktabija with her dart, thunderbolt, arrows, swords, and spears, when Chamunda went on drinking his book. Stricken with a multitude of weapons and bloodless, the great asura Raktabija fell on the ground, O King. Thereupon the devas attained great joy, O King.

The band of Matrs who sprang from them dance, being intoxicated with blood. Here ends the eighth chapter called 'The Slaying of Raktabija' of Devi-mahatmya in Markandeya-purana, during the period of Savarni, the Manu. The Slaying of Nis h umbha. The king Suratha said: After Raktabija was slain and other asuras were killed in the fight, the asura S h umbha and Nis h umbha gave way to unbounded wrath.

Enraged on seeing his great army slaughtered, Nis h umbha then rushed forward with the chief forces of the asuras. In front of him behind him and on both sides of him, great asuras, enraged and biting their lips, advanced to slay the Devi. S h umbha also, mighty in valour, went forward, surrounded, with his own troops to slay Chandika in this rage, after fighting with the Matrs. Then commenced severe combat between the Devi on one side and on the other, S h umbha and Nis h umbha who, like two thunder-clouds, rained a most tempestuous shower of arrows on her.

Chandika with numerous arrows quickly split the arrows shot by the two asuras and smote the two lords of asuras on their limbs with her mass of weapons. Nis h umbha, grasping a sharp sword and a shining shield, struck the lion, the great carrier of the Devi on the head.

When her carrier was struck, the Devi quickly cut Nis h umbha's superb sword with a sharp-edged arrow and also his shield on which eight moons were figured. When his shield was slit and his sword too broken, the asura hurled his spear; and that missile also, as it advanced towards her, was split into two by her discus. Then the danava Nis h umbha, swelling with wrath, seized a dart; and that also, as it came, the Devi powdered with a blow of her fist. Then brandishing his club, he flung it against Chandika; cleft by the trident of the Devi, it also turned to ashes.

Then the Devi assailed the heroic danava advancing with battle-axe in hand, and laid him low on the ground. When his brother Nis h umbha of terrific prowess fell to the ground, S h umbha got infuriated in the extreme, and strode forward to slay Ambika.

Standing in his chariot and grasping excellent weapons in his long and incomparable eight arms, he shone by pervading the entire sky. Seeing him approaching, the Devi blew her conch, and made a twang of her bow-string, which was unbearable in the extreme. And the Devi filled all directions with the ringing of her bell, which destroys the strength of all the daitya hosts. The lion filled the heaven, the earth and the ten quarters of the sky with loud roars, which made the elephants give up their violent rut.

Then Kali, springing upwards in the sky, came down and struck the earth with both her hands; by its noise all the previous sounds were drowned. S h ivaduti made a loud ominous peal of laughter, the asuras were frightened by those sounds, and S h umbha flew into an utmost rage.

As Ambika said, 'O evil-natured one, stop, stop', the devas stationed in the sky cheered her with the words, 'Be victorious'. The spear, flaming most terribly and shining like a mass of fire, which S h umbha approaching hurled was, as it was coming along, put out by a great firebrand from the Devi. The interspace between the three worlds was pervaded by S h umbha's lion-like roar, but the dreadful thunder-clap of the Devi smothered that, O King.

The Devi split the arrows shot by S h umbha, and S h umbha also split the arrows discharged by her, each with her and his sharp arrows in hundreds and thousands. Then Chandika became angry and smote him with a trident.

Wounded therewith, he fainted and fell to the ground. Then Nis h umbha, regaining consciousness seized his bow and struck with arrows the Devi and Kali and the lion. And the danuja-lord, the son of Diti, putting forth a myriad arms, covered Chandika with myriad discuses.

Then Bhagavati Durga, the destroyer of difficulties and afflictions, became angry and split those discuses and those arrows with her own arrows. Thereupon Nis h umbha, surrounded by the daitya host, swiftly seizing his club, rushed at Chandika to sly her. As he was just rushing at her, Chandika colve his club with her sharp-edged sword; and her took hold of a dart. As Nis h umbha, the afflicter of the devas, was advancing with the dart in hand, Chandika pierced him in the heart with a swiftly hurled dart.

From his Nis h umbha's heart that was pierced by the dart, issued forth another person of great strength and valour, exclaiming at the Devi 'Stop. Then the Devi, laughing aloud, severed the head of him, who issued forth, with her sword. Thereupon he fell to the ground. It consists of Chapters 74 to 86 of the Markandeya Purana[1] and has stanzas. He tells him that one king called Suradha, who was driven out of his kingdom by his own people met one Vysya[2] called Samadhi who was also driven out of his home by his family.

They discover that both of them worry about the welfare of those that had driven them out of their respective homes. It appears to them that this is unnatural. So they approach Sage Sumedhas who was also living in the forest. The sage tells them that all this is the illusion created by the great Goddess called Vishnu Maya. They became curious and want to know about this great mother Goddess.

He then relates to them the story of Devi Mahatmya, which consists of three stories in all of which the mother Goddess kills the enemies of Gods. The first story is that of Madhu and Kaidabha. They take birth from the earwax of Lord Vishnu while he was asleep and start troubling Lord Brahma.

Lord Brahma prays to the Goddess to help him continue his work of creation. The goddess appears and takes the form of Lord Vishnu and kills both Asuras after wrestling with them for thousands of years.

Since both these Asuras were of tamasic origin, she also had a tamasic form. The second story is that of Mahishasura. This asura, who had the form of buffalo, drove away the devas and Indra from their homes.

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