Ebook cashflow quadrant bahasa indonesia


 

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Ebook Cashflow Quadrant Bahasa Indonesia

Kaya" download 4. Robert T. Kiyosaki: "BussinessSchool (bahasa indonesia)" download 5. Robert T. Kiyosaki: "The Cashflow Quadrant" download. Download my CASHFLOW Quadrant eBook for FREE. This week only! terney.info /wvvKo. PM - 5 May Retweets; Likes; مازن الشارخ · Bobby. i need ebook from robert kiyosaki,, can u help me. Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant Rich Dad's Guide To Financial Freedom AUTHOR: Robert Discover how to move from the left side to the B and I Quadrants . . Robert T. Kiyosaki - The Cashflow Quadrant [Bahasa Indonesia].

Kiyosaki you. What do you want to be when you grow up? That is a question most of us have been asked. I had many interests as a kid, and it was easy to choose. If it sounded exciting and glamorous, I wanted to do it. I knew I did not want to become a teacher, a writer, or an accountant. I did not want to be a teacher because I did not like school. I did not want to be a writer because I failed English twice. Ironically, now that I have grown up, I have become everything I never wanted to become. Although I disliked school, today I own an education company. I personally teach around the world because I love teaching. Although I failed English twice because I could not write, today I am best known as an author. So what does this have to do with the question: What is your goal in life? The answer is found in the simple, yet profound, statement by a Vietnamese monk, Thich Naht Hahn: The path is the goal.

Although I disliked school, today I own an education company. I personally teach around the world because I love teaching.

Rich Dad's Cashflow Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom

Although I failed English twice because I could not write, today I am best known as an author. So what does this have to do with the question: What is your goal in life? The answer is found in the simple, yet profound, statement by a Vietnamese monk, Thich Naht Hahn: The path is the goal. In other words, finding your path in life is your goal in life. Your path is not your profession, how much money you make, your title, or your successes and failures. Finding your path means finding out what you were put here on this earth to do.

Why were you given this gift called life? And what is the gift you give back to life?

Rich Dad's Cashflow Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom

As you know, most people are programmed early in life to Go to school and get a job. School is about finding a job in the E or S quadrant. I realize there are people who know exactly what they are going to do early in life.

They grow up knowing they are going to be a doctor, lawyer, musician, golfer or actor. We have all heard about child prodigies, kids with exceptional talents. My answer is: I wish I knew. Since I do not have a magic wand nor can I tell you what to do, the best thing I can do is tell you what I did. And what I did was trust my intuition, my heart, and my guts. For example, in , returning from the war, when my poor dad suggested I go back to school, get my higher degrees, and work for the government, my brain went numb, my heart went heavy and my gut said, No way.

When he suggested I get my old job back with Standard Oil or fly for the airlines, again my mind, heart, and gut said no. I knew I was through sailing and flying, although they were great professions and the pay was pretty good. In at the age of 26, I was growing up.

The problem was, they were professions and the dreams of a child. At the age of 26, I was old enough to know that education is a process. And when I wanted to learn to fly, I went to Navy flight school, a two-year process that turns non-pilots into pilots. I was cautious about my next educational process. I wanted to know what I was going to become before I started my next educational process.

Traditional schools had been good to me. He was very excited about it. The more I read the book though the more upset I became. Not because there was nothing of value, but because there was nothing to get excited about. The book has some good points about how you should try to earn money as an investor and how taking additional risk can generate additional income.

Unfortunately, he seems to spurn education Found this book a bit irritating. Unfortunately, he seems to spurn education and the true valuation of risk. So, I didn't like the book. Maybe it's because I went to a good business school. You know, where they teach you actual business principles.

Ones that make you think that he is full of it and that more of his money seemed to be made writing about money than making it the ways he details. Oh, wait. Maybe that's why he doesn't seem to value higher education. It enables you to see through his BS.

Well, two stars because it's twice as good as his first book.

Rich Dad's Cashflow Quadrant

I'd say to pass though unless you get it from the library Then you can invest the money you would have spent on something of value. Kiyosaki would have to agree that's a better move. Having read that book first, I was surprised and disappointed by how much material in Cashflow Quadrant was overtly recycled. I would expect a sequel to have more original material, but apart from new stories and analogies, the basic ideas are the same.

I can't say I recommend it for those who have read the first book. This is probably the better book of the two, so if a reader were going to peruse just one, let it be thi I would give this three stars if I hadn't already read Rich Dad, Poor Dad.

Rich Dad Poor Dad Download ( Pages)

This is probably the better book of the two, so if a reader were going to peruse just one, let it be this. Heads up, this review is biased It is dull and insulting to say the least. As a teacher, former nanny and occasional babysitter, I live on the left side. This book is for those who want more than that. Want to own a business or invest. Even if we make money through the process we are going through, I will still want to be a teacher.

These books should definitely be read sequentially, as the concepts in this book are built on the foundation laid in the first. Whether you are just starting to ramp up your financial literacy or you are a well versed investor, this book will give you something to learn. While his advice felt obvious and theoretical, he does find ways to layer in trace amounts of practical advice through personal experience, such as how to navigate the specific details of a real estate investment.

No real information about Rich dad's so called brilliant cash flow quadrant. I'm beginning to doubt if it's even a real thing other than just a list of sources of income and expenses.

Anyway, this "book" is just a long winded way of saying "go download my board game to learn what this book was supposed to tell you. Cashflow Quadrant has very few new ideas. The theme of this book is business ownership think Corporation not small business and investing are the only ways to build long term wealth. Cashflow or passive income are vehicles the wealthy use to create generational wealth. This book is not a how to book and does not get specific with how to evaluate a stock or make a real estate deal.

If you are a person who can understand a point quickly and do not need the author to repeat himself I recommend re Cashflow Quadrant has very few new ideas. If you are a person who can understand a point quickly and do not need the author to repeat himself I recommend reading Rich Dad Poor Dad. It is a shorter book and a better story. The premise of this book revolves around something like this: E mployed - you exchange time and effort to get paid and generate income for someone else.

B usiness - you have people working hard to generate income for you. S elf employed - you exchange time and effort to get paid. I nvestor - money works for you.

Plus something like this: Finances can be assessed by looking at your income money coming in , your expenses money going out , your assets wealth generating tools and your liabilitie Summary: Finances can be assessed by looking at your income money coming in , your expenses money going out , your assets wealth generating tools and your liabilities something you are responsible for and manage the risk of.

Your goal should be to have your assets generate enough income to cover your expenses and eliminate liabilities. That's it. You're a millionaire! But seriously, this book is a good piece of financial literacy that provides some useful concepts to start cleaning up your financial life. I would recommend this book to anyone keen on some light financial insights.

The main message I took from this book is was really just how to have more general awareness about your finances and the simple concept of having assets generate enough income to cover the other three financial areas.

Some notable points: If you're hauling buckets and don't want to be, take steps to change. In these times we should be looking to seek freedom. If you do something, you make mistakes, and it's from our mistakes that we learn the most. Learning comes from taking action, making mistakes and then correcting them. That is when wisdom sets in.

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