Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Download our free ePUB, PDF or MOBI eBooks to read on almost any device — your desktop The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Get your free eBook now!. HUCKLEBERRY FINN. Scene: The Mississippi Valley. Time: Forty to fifty years ago. You don't know about me, without you have read a book by the name of The .

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Huck Finn Ebook

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Mark Twain. This web edition published by [email protected] Last updated Wednesday, December 17, at Free illustrated PDF, epub, Kindle ebook. With over illustrations. Mark Twains classic tale concerns young Huckleberry Finn who runs away from home. He. “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before.

Twain, M. Lit2Go Edition. June 20, Next The embedded audio player requires a modern internet browser. You should visit Browse Happy and update your internet browser today! I laid there in the grass and the cool shade thinking about things, and feeling rested and ruther comfortable and satisfied. I could see the sun out at one or two holes, but mostly it was big trees all about, and gloomy in there amongst them. There was freckled places on the ground where the light sifted down through the leaves, and the freckled places swapped about a little, showing there was a little breeze up there. A couple of squirrels set on a limb and jabbered at me very friendly. I rouses up, and rests on my elbow and listens; pretty soon I hears it again. I hopped up, and went and looked out at a hole in the leaves, and I see a bunch of smoke laying on the water a long ways up — about abreast the ferry. And there was the ferryboat full of people floating along down. I knowed what was the matter now. You see, they was firing cannon over the water, trying to make my carcass come to the top.

I give her a turn with the paddle and brung her nose to shore; then I got my gun and slipped out and into the edge of the woods.

I sat down there on a log, and looked out through the leaves. I see the moon go off watch, and the darkness begin to blanket the river. But in a little while I see a pale streak over the treetops, and knowed the day was coming.

So I took my gun and slipped off towards where I had run across that camp fire, stopping every minute or two to listen. But by and by, sure enough, I catched a glimpse of fire away through the trees.

I went for it, cautious and slow. By and by I was close enough to have a look, and there laid a man on the ground. It most give me the fantods. He had a blanket around his head, and his head was nearly in the fire. I set there behind a clump of bushes in about six foot of him, and kept my eyes on him steady.

It was getting gray daylight now. I bet I was glad to see him. He bounced up and stared at me wild. I was ever so glad to see Jim.

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I talked along, but he only set there and looked at me; never said nothing. Make up your camp fire good. Den we kin git sumfn better den strawbries.

I think I could. But you got a gun.

Oh, yes, you got a gun. I catched a good big catfish, too, and Jim cleaned him with his knife, and fried him. When breakfast was ready we lolled on the grass and eat it smoking hot. Jim laid it in with all his might, for he was most about starved. Then when we had got pretty well stuffed, we laid off and lazied.

I lit out mighty quick, I tell you. Well, I wuz dah all night. Den I swum to de stern uv it en tuck a-holt. So I clumb up en laid down on de planks. How could a body do it in de night? I knowed dey was arter you. I see um go by heah — watched um thoo de bushes. Jim said it was a sign it was going to rain. He said it was a sign when young chickens flew that way, and so he reckoned it was the same way when young birds done it.

He said it was death. He said his father laid mighty sick once, and some of them catched a bird, and his old granny said his father would die, and he did. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better. After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in dead people.

Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people.

They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself. Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a spelling-book.

She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Where the log forked I could peep through. By and by she come along, and she drifted in so close that they could a run out a plank and walked ashore. Most everybody was on the boat. I hope so, anyway. They all crowded up and leaned over the rails, nearly in my face, and kept still, watching with all their might.

The boat floated on and went out of sight around the shoulder of the island. The island was three mile long. I judged they had got to the foot, and was giving it up. They turned around the foot of the island and started up the channel on the Missouri side, under steam, and booming once in a while as they went.

I crossed over to that side and watched them. When they got abreast the head of the island they quit shooting and dropped over to the Missouri shore and went home to the town. I knowed I was all right now. Nobody else would come a-hunting after me.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

I got my traps out of the canoe and made me a nice camp in the thick woods. I catched a catfish and haggled him open with my saw, and towards sundown I started my camp fire and had supper. Then I set out a line to catch some fish for breakfast. And so for three days and nights. No difference — just the same thing. But the next day I went exploring around down through the island.

Huck Finn's America

I was boss of it; it all belonged to me, so to say, and I wanted to know all about it; but mainly I wanted to put in the time. I found plenty strawberries, ripe and prime; and green summer grapes, and green razberries; and the green blackberries was just beginning to show.

They would all come handy by and by, I judged. About this time I mighty near stepped on a good-sized snake, and it went sliding off through the grass and flowers, and I after it, trying to get a shot at it.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain

I clipped along, and all of a sudden I bounded right on to the ashes of a camp fire that was still smoking. My heart jumped up amongst my lungs.

I never waited for to look further, but uncocked my gun and went sneaking back on my tiptoes as fast as ever I could. I slunk along another piece further, then listened again; and so on, and so on. If I see a stump, I took it for a man; if I trod on a stick and broke it, it made me feel like a person had cut one of my breaths in two and I only got half, and the short half, too.

All I could get to eat was berries and what was left over from breakfast. By the time it was night I was pretty hungry. So when it was good and dark I slid out from shore before moonrise and paddled over to the Illinois bank — about a quarter of a mile.

I got everything into the canoe as quick as I could, and then went creeping through the woods to see what I could find out. I tied up in the old place, and reckoned I would sleep in the canoe. And every time I waked up I thought somebody had me by the neck.

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Well, I felt better right off. So I took my paddle and slid out from shore just a step or two, and then let the canoe drop along down amongst the shadows.

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