This is not a course in Latin but on the other hand it is not a reference grammar either. As the introduction says, "it aims to be a 'primer' (a first book) and at the. A classic Latin grammar favored by many students and teachers, all advanced students have this good, solid book nearby for consultation and private study. What books should you read if you want to study Latin? Hillard and Botting — all these people who wrote Latin grammar books before it had this great decline.

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Latin Grammar Book

Although I've been doing Latin a little while now, I realise that I haven't got a very good grammar book. I've been mostly dependent on. Could somebody tell me what is the best Latin grammar for somebody who hasn't studied it in about 45 years? I'm ambitiously considering. Cambridge Latin Course: Cambridge Latin Grammar by Cambridge School Classics Project, , available at Book Depository with free delivery.

Before we get to number one, I should ask you—we know the answer to this, but for the unenlightened—why should anyone learn Latin? Why would anyone want to? It was there, on and off, in different countries, for varying from to years. It had an absolutely massive effect on those countries, and still has a massive effect today: on their language, on their culture, on their history, on their architecture, on their art. By learning Latin, you have a little beginning into all those fields. But as you make clear in your book, you can read about Roman culture in your native language. Why should you bother to try and read about it in Latin? Why learn their language? That speaks for itself. Moving beyond that, Latin is the basis of all Romance languages in Europe. It gives you this universal key to these other languages. If you want to do that, learn French or German.

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For enquiries regarding the delivery of your order, contact Star Track Customer Service on 13 23 45 - and quote the above consignment number. It had an absolutely massive effect on those countries, and still has a massive effect today: By learning Latin, you have a little beginning into all those fields. But as you make clear in your book, you can read about Roman culture in your native language.

Why should you bother to try and read about it in Latin? Why learn their language? That speaks for itself. Moving beyond that, Latin is the basis of all Romance languages in Europe.

It gives you this universal key to these other languages. If you want to do that, learn French or German. But, by learning the earliest incarnation of all these languages, you naturally start to think about the journey from its original form—in, say, BC—all the way till now.

The same applies to Roman or Greek history. You think about the gap. Wilson about the Bible. You naturally think about the journey of the language, the history, the culture, the politics, the architecture, all the rest of it. Your mind would naturally start to think about the jump between World War II and now. Again, extremely important, the creation of the EU and all the rest of it.

If you go back to both Greek and Latin, not the earliest languages of all time, but two of the earliest languages in which a sophisticated, huge body of literature, culture and all the rest of it is begun or expanded, you have the foundation stone, and you can start to build all the way up to the modern day.

Latin is even relevant for so-called modernist work. There are two aspects to that. Classical culture invented so many of the great eternal stories: But also, because it was studied so intensely, it was constantly referred to, imitated, mocked, satirized in art, in literature, right up until the s and 60s. So, again, you have this idea of a universal key into European culture. What do you reckon about the satisfaction of studying Latin? There are an awful lot of people who, when I talk about Latin, say they did it and hated it.

I can understand that. On the whole, if you have 10 words of Latin in a sentence, translating that into English, you end up with 15 or 20 words. I liken it to a concertina: Because of all those things that people do find difficult—the declensions, the conjugations, the gerund, the gerundive and all the rest of it—Latin words are packed with dozens of meanings.

It is a bit like cracking a secret code.

Latin Grammar for the Grammar Stage | Memoria Press

Greek is, if anything, even more sophisticated, with thousands more word endings. If you like it, it is a great pleasure going from one to the other. So the best books on learning Greek for our next interview! It is the Bible because it has all the conjugations of the verbs and the declensions of the nouns. It also has, in very concise form, practically all the rules of grammar and syntax. Kennedy was, I think, a Latin master in Liverpool.

William Lily (grammarian)

My father told me that because every year whole new generations of school children bought the book, the borders of Lake Geneva were filled with huge villas lived in by people like Kennedy, Hillard and Botting — all these people who wrote Latin grammar books before it had this great decline.

They became, very early on, standard books, because they were beautifully worked out to be extremely efficient in the delivery of information. Kennedy is very concise, but it has the answer to every problem in Latin in it. The only one that sold at all well was this one. I could probably have bought, not a villa, but a very, very small flat on the outskirts of London on the proceeds. He imagines people going, in the future, to these rundown churches and still trying to find the altar and touching various holy stones.

He thinks of himself as an agnostic, I think, but he says that there is a hunger for seriousness in all of us. I think there really is. Latin and Greek and an awful lot of difficult things were thrown out of most British schools in the 50s and 60s, but that hunger still survives. Get the weekly Five Books newsletter. There are an awful lot of parents who learned Latin and Greek who are concerned that their children no longer are.

Even if they hated it, they have a memory of this serious and difficult subject. It is difficult to learn properly, but I do think people patronize children. Perhaps not all, but a lot of children quite like difficulty. The Latin argument in the last couple of years has become very, very furious — as often happens with arguments about slightly obscure subjects. There is something very funny about Latin. You can be funny, but you can teach the rigorous stuff at the same time.

It has lots of jolly bits of history, nice pictures done in an easy-going way, but all the proper rules are there: Does Oulton do enough?

A Latin Grammar

How do you keep their attention? I, like you, teach Latin and tutor children of 9 or You can do it by being an amusing, good teacher. Only Latin and Greek were treated in this way — I think because of the associations with elitism and public school.

They were given different treatment. Somehow it was shameful that these subjects were difficult to learn, and so they had to be dumbed down. I disagree with the premise of your question. There are only 2 or 3. But I feel it strongly.

Parents bloody love it. I just fundamentally disagree with the idea that the learning of it should necessarily be pleasurable. You can either have the old-fashioned serious books of the 19th century, the s, 30s which are a little dull and dry. Then there are ones like the Cambridge Latin Course , which fall over themselves to be nice and easygoing and therefore useless.

Oulton is in the middle. So it squares the circle. So looking at your list: I think there are three Oulton books, and there are some answer books as well. The way I teach is that I try and persuade the children to appreciate how different Latin is from the language they speak. Do you know this book? There is no English equivalent of the ablative absolute.

So the headmaster got in the Latin teachers to teach them English grammar. The reason why that word is what it is is that if you were standing for an election in Rome, you would sprinkle yourself with chalk dust — to be the prominent person in the market place.

So you would be the candidus, the candid one, the white, pure, unvarnished one and ultimately the candidate. Now, less about my suggestions, and on to your next book. Asterix in Britain is an extremely good book.

A handy reference companion to all Henle Latin levels

A lot of it is quite straightforward Latin and they have very good vocabulary lists, as well, in the book. Anyone who reads Asterix knows that Obelix, his fat friend, is very interested in eating wild boar. But otherwise the Latin is really quite simple. Have you tried any of them? But they are really nice, easygoing ways for grown ups, as well as children, to do their first translations. One thing I like to do with children—which is a bit along the lines of Asterix—is if they look really tired and the parents have gone out, I switch on Gladiator.

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