The Eye of the World. The Great Hunt. The Dragon Reborn. The Shadow Rising. The Fires of Heaven. Lord of Chaos. A Crown of Swords. The Path of Daggers. The Path Of Daggers – Wheel Of Time 08 Robert Jordan This is a work of fiction. All the characters and events portraye The Path of Daggers · The Path of. Robert Jordan - The Wheel of Time 08 - The Path of Daggers. Home · Robert Jordan - The Wheel of Time 08 - The Path of Daggers.

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Path Of Daggers Pdf

Get Instant Access to The Path Of Daggers (Wheel Of Time) By Robert Jordan # 8f EBOOK. EPUB KINDLE PDF. Read Download Online. 6 days ago The Path Of Daggers Wheel Time 8 Robert Jordan - [Free] The Path Of 8 Robert Jordan [PDF] [EPUB] The Wheel of Time is a series of high. The Path Of Daggers The Wheel Of Time Book 8 - [Free] The Path Of Time Book 8 [PDF] [EPUB] The Wheel of Time is a series of high fantasy.

Book 10 of the Wheel of Time. Book 13 of the Wheel of Time. Book 12 of the Wheel of Time. A Wheel of Time Prequel. A Crown Of Swords: Book 7 of the Wheel of Time. Book 2 of the Wheel of Time. The World According to Anna. The Unfinished Novel and Other stories. From the Place in the Valley Deep in the Forest. Book 8 of the Wheel of Time. Download Image Download Image. The Path Of Daggers:

Adlin, Jane. Vanities: Art of the Dressing Table. Ainsworth, Maryan W. Waterman with contributions by Timothy B. Husband and Karen E. Centeno, and Peter Klein. Bayer, Peter J. Boehm, Andrew Bolton, Sheila R. Canby, Iria Candela, John T. Doyle, Maryam Ekhtiar, Douglas S. Eklund, Alyce Englund, Helen C. Hokanson, Melanie Holcomb, Mellissa J. Huber, Timothy B. Lightfoot, Charles T.

Little, Mark P. Mertens, J. Wolohojian, and Sylvia Yount. Cotter, Lambertus van Zelst, and Edward V. Allen, Josephine L. Ainsworth, Dirk H. Breiding, George R. Appleby, John H. The flaws stand out more as the plot thins. I've gotten through three of these books in ten months. Even if I manage to do one per month from here on out, I won't be My crawl through this series continues. Even if I manage to do one per month from here on out, I won't be getting to A Memory of Light until April though I anticipate my enjoyment increasing when Sanderson takes over, so maybe let's say March instead.

What's really frustrating about this series is that Jordan was clearly a gifted worldbuilder. Even as my enjoyment in these books decreases, it's clear that an incredible amount of thought and planning went into their creation. The level of detail on each culture, their histories, traditions and behaviors.

The ways each nation interacts with another. The ways the current situation with Rand and the Forsaken and the approaching last battle have created a complicated interlocking game of cause and effect, each player trying to seize control.

But the problem here is that none of that makes for a compelling narrative. A story should not be an excuse to show off your worldbuilding. The worldbuilding should be there as support to the story, not the focus. So, so many times in this book, I found myself overwhelmed and bored by the sheer amount of superfluous characters with no arcs and no bearing on the story.

So many times characters just sit around musing on things that have happened or aren't happening or are going to happen, while nothing actually happens for hundreds of pages on end because Jordan wanted to make sure we really got that the Aes Sedai argue a lot. So what actually happened in this book? Much more in the second half than in the first, certainly. Elayne accidentally blows things up while undoing a weave, causing the rumor to spread that the Aes Sedai have a new weapon.

Elayne and Aviendha decide to officially become first sisters.

The Path of Daggers

They travel to Caemlyn so Elayne can take her throne. There is a traitor in their midst. They make an alliance with Alliandre. They travel to find Masema. Perrin learns that if he yells at Faile, she will be less mad at him all the time.

While Perrin is off retrieving Masema, Faile along with Alliandre and her servants, which includes Morgase in disguise are capture by the Shaido.

Egwene makes her move to solidify her power with the Aes Sedai. She maneuvers so that the Hall declares war on Elaida, and the book ends with her forces Traveling to the Dragonmount.

Rand is finally succumbing to the madness from the taint of Saidin. He spends the whole book trying to save face and not let anyone see how sick he is. He is also paranoid. He is also paranoid with reason, as his own Ash'aman include traitors. They push back the Seanchan in Ebou Dar at great cost. Rand kills a bunch of people on both sides. Dashiva the Ash'aman for some reason decides to kill him when they are back in Cairhien. Rand decides to go see Elayne so as to formalize their little polyamorous arrangement, and also he is butthurt because he thinks she doesn't like him anymore.

Various interludes showcase the Forsaken, the Shaido, etc. None of them are really significant or interesting, except the one with Cadsuane, which shows she may be the one to get through to Rand who is a terrible leader , and the one at the White Tower, which shows some sisters finally beginning to make progress on identifying the Black Ajah within their ranks.

This book was pages long. At least it wasn't longer. I wish he would stop treading water and stop wasting precious narrative time on petty feuds and layovers and status updates, and give us the real goods: Unfortunately, I've been reliably informed that I've got two more books of meandering before the pace supposedly picks up again in book eleven.

Lastly, I just want to talk about Rand for a sec. He was a harmlessly likable main character in book one, and only mildly irritating in book two, but since then, he has just descended into this heartless, cruel, anger-ridden character who is so incredibly uninteresting to read about.

He doesn't seem to be learning, and no one is telling him in a competent, human way that he is terrible. Take this exchange, between Rand and Narishma.

Narishma is one of his Ash'aman, and he has just come back from a perilous errand to retrieve the sword Callandor, an errand that Rand sent him on. This is how he treats Narishma upon his return: Springing from the cot, Rand snatched the bundle before Narishma could proffer it. I expected you last night.

You nearly killed me. He was sure of it. There was no point in trusting the man as far as he had, only to have him die and ruin everything. Carefully he tucked the bundle beneath his cot. His hands trembled with the urge to strip the wrapping away, to make sure they held what Narishma had been sent for. The man would not have dared to return if they did not. Narishma, who has given Rand no indication of being untrustworthy in fact, Rand must have trusted him to give him such an important mission, out of hundreds of Ash'aman has just come back, giving Rand what he asked for, and he has done so letting Rand know there were extra wards that Rand did not tell him about.

Instead of thanking him for risking his life and succeeding despite unexpected peril, Rand berates him, disbelieves him. He immediately distrusts his comrade, instead of thinking that someone else might have added wards on top of his own as a trap for anyone retrieving the sword.

He then dismisses Narishma seemingly without thought, parting by threatening to kill him. He has taken a moment in which he could have built solidarity with his subordinate, inspired loyalty, and instead dismissed and humiliated and threatened him.

There is absolutely no reason Rand could not have expressed the same practical sentiments, even the part about secrecy being worth Narishma's life, in more appreciative terms, in terms an actual leader would use, a leader who inspires his troops rather than rules them from a place of fear, as Rand is doing now.

I kind of despise him. Richard Rahl from the Sword of Truth I've read through book five as of now. Total and utter dictator. And while I still hold out hope that Rand will learn to effectively lead and rehumanize himself in future books, I fully expect Richard to become even worse over time, as the author clearly believes his actions noble, and has no intention of criticizing them.

I don't foresee it changing my opinion about the book one way or the other. At least I know two things that will happen, even if almost nothing else will.

I think there is still more dull to come] This is definitely one of the weaker books in the series so far, and there are a large number of pages where it feels like very little happens. I'm still enjoying my reread, but I know that things will only get slower before they finally pick back up again.

Doing this book in audio is pretty much a must for me now. I don't think I'd have managed to read it very quickly otherwise. Micheal Kramer and Kate Reading are fantastic as always. Full Review This book should ma Executive Summary: There is so much pointless bickering at times, it really bogs part of the book down. There are a few very big plot developments here, one near the beginning, but most of them occur near the end.

That leaves a lot of pages in between where I was left wondering what the point of some of these chapters were. And if that's not bad enough, Mat was completely missing. We got a lot of him in the last book, and he seems to like to take time away, much like he did with Perrin in The Fires of Heaven.

My other problem is that I find myself starting to get annoyed by many of the characters. I think my affection for many of them at different parts of the series helps carry me through, but I feel like a lot of this could have been edited down. I'm still enjoying my reread, but I'm dreading the next two books a little bit. Of course the end of this book left me eager to pick up the next one soon, but that's often the case with this series, even in the weakest books.

Mar 23, Phrynne rated it really liked it. I really enjoyed this book and what a great series this is turning out to be. There was a lot more action in this one which is number 8 and a lot of character development. I am listening to the series on audio book and was quite surprised when it suddenly finished right in the middle of so many major events.

Now I have to start straight into the next book. How lucky they are all published and I do not have to wait weeks or even years for the next instalment! View all 3 comments. I enjoyed it as much as the previous books. I sound like a broken record, but maybe that's appropriate for a series called The Wheel of Time Quite a few small and not-so-small threads made some significant progress and there were several things I particularly enjoyed reading about.

My spoiler-filled comments are enclosed in the tags below. These are just random comments about some of the things I enjoyed or that stuck out to me. I was also happy to see Elayne get back home to start dealing with the business of taking the throne.

Assuming the ones who were captured by the Shaido get free, or get rescued by Perrin, of course, and they all manage to meet back up. This was one of the storylines I wanted to spend more time in. Initial results seem promising. I was also really engrossed in the itsy bitsy storyline that started in the previous book with Seaine and Pevara trying to root out the black ajah in the white tower.

Very few pages have been devoted to it, but I was enjoying it, especially once they started using the oath rod. Logain finally showed back up too, but so, so briefly. I'm expecting more trouble! Mat and Thom were both completely missing from this book, which was a little annoying considering they were in jeopardy at the end of the previous book.

There wasn't very much of Met in this book I guess everyone need a break at some point of this looong story; , so I will reminiscence on some details about Mat, that is the best bloody character I've ever read!!!

Blood and bloody ashes! I'm usually pretty good at staying alive. I've only failed one time that I can remem There wasn't very much of Met in this book I guess everyone need a break at some point of this looong story; , so I will reminiscence on some details about Mat, that is the best bloody character I've ever read!!!

I've only failed one time that I can remember, and it hardly counts Dec 22, Richard Bray rated it liked it. By the time the next book had been published, I found it impossible to distinguish the lesser characters or keep the infinite subplots tidy in my mind.

The first is his wordiness, the way he uses a full page to describe something when a sentence will do. Sometimes it makes for beautiful prose, but most of the time it just seems like verbal diarrhea. Jordan reminds me of these people. Jordan has created a deep and detailed world and he literally provides us with dozens of POV characters. Early in the series, this was a strength, but as Jordan has added more characters, plots and subplots, it has become too much for him — and possibly any author — to manage.

Characters take center stage in one book, then disappear for the next two. Or a character does nothing for a book or two, finally lulling you into complete and utter apathy, and then they take center stage. But once she became the Amyrlin Seat, she spent the next two books doing nothing. Then she began taking action in this book, moving the plot forward and changing the landscape of the story.

Without going into details, the book ends after setting up a siege, a succession, a betrayal, and a capture. Add in Mat's cliffhanger, and that's six times the usual frustration. Just be glad you don't need to wait for the next book anymore! All that said, this is an enjoyable and well-written story. We have epic battles, surprise appearances by objects of Power, even some amusing light shed on a few relationships.

But the three Aes Sedai-related stories really take the spotlight here perhaps another reason the book isn't all that popular. Egwene finally begins openly asserting her power, while Elayne sets into motion significant events on both sides of the world. Best of all, seemingly minor Aes Sedai begin an important and long overdue witch hunt that is completely satisfying.

There is one particular theme of this book that really changed the series for me. I didn't like book 8 any more than most people the first time I read it, but I have since come to actually like the much-maligned Aes Sedai, and the reason starts here.

So far they've proven arrogant, often incompetent, and rarely live up to their reputation. When Egwene proposes a major change in their philosophy, I think most readers would agree with her. However, it is at this point that you really begin to respect the Aes Sedai compared to the various other groups of channelers. They have been humbled at every turn, but they are the ones who've held the world together for 3, years, and that's no coincidence.

Not only does their fate begin to change here, it's become increasingly clear that their largest problems aren't actually their fault. What it comes down to is that book 8 is a lot more palatable now that book 9 and 10, 11, and 12 are readily available. Reading a book filled with cliffhangers, even if it does have a few "holy shit!

In many ways, book 8 breaks the implied promise of the author, that the story will be further along at the end than at the beginning. In truth it is, but it certainly doesn't feel like it without the context of later events. But stick with it, because the series is finally hitting its peak, and things are about to start changing. View 2 comments. Apr 16, Gavin rated it really liked it Shelves: This was another fun instalment in the WoT series. Just like the last book plot advancement was moving at a snails pace but we did get a few interesting developments and the story was always entertaining.

It is the characters, Jordan's storytelling, and the sheer size of the world that make this such a great fantasy series. So what actually happened in this 8th WoT book? Most of our favourite characters went on much as the have been doing for the last few books!

Egwene - She This was another fun instalment in the WoT series. Egwene - She edged closer to the White Tower with her rebels and continued to grow into her role as Amyrlin Seat. I thought this was a good book for her character. Nynaeve and Elayne - They are still stuck at the hip but the pair did have an eventful book.

Rand - It was another action packed book for Rand. As well as dealing with the usual political manoeuvrings he had to repel another Seanchan invasion and survive numerous assassination attempts. His chapters were probably the most exciting of any character in this book.

Perrin - He got started on his mission to deal with Masema, the Prophet, and his own group merged with Morgase's group. Which provided a ton of amusing moments as she is travelling in disguise. Mat - OK the guy was totally missing in this instalment.

Weirdly I never even realized he was gone until I read in a friends review that he had not featured at all in this 8th WoT book. Obviously I never missed him. That said, things did end in a bit of a cliffhanger in the 7th book with him so I hope he features heavily in the next book. The Love Interests - Min, Aviendha, and Faile had little to do in this book and at this point in the story their whole reason for being is simply to be love interests for their guys. Min actually had a good book.

She seems a great fit for Rand and was fairly helpful to him throught the story. Faile was Faile. Aviendha really just tagged along a bit with Elayne and Nynaeve. Jordan very much seems to have her character on the shelf for now.

Minor Characters - There were a few but the ones who were the most memorable were Morgase and Siuan. The Villains - There POV segments are usually short and super interesting and it was no different in this book as we got a glimpse into what the likes of Greandal, Moridin, Sevanna, Eladia, Alviarin, and a few others were up to.

All in all I thought this was a good addition to the series and I seemed like the story flew by while I was reading it which is always a very positive sign. Audio Note: Another great performance from Krammer and Reading. We tend to root for most anti-heroes, but every now and then, authors dare to set a real stinker at the centerpiece of their stories.

The path of daggers

Sometimes it works. Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer qualifies, I think. And before we certify all shepherds as pure-at-heart heroes, check out Halldor Laxness's Bjartur in Independent People.

But these are all examples drawn from the literary canon. What happens when fantasy, a genre often prone t We tend to root for most anti-heroes, but every now and then, authors dare to set a real stinker at the centerpiece of their stories. What happens when fantasy, a genre often prone to portraying the righteous struggles of angelic heroes against twisted villains, tries to create a real jerk who is also supposed to be not only a hero but a savior?

Believe it or not, I've heard people complain that they abandoned "The Wheel of Time" because Rand al'Thor became a jerk. To be honest, Robert Jordan has laid extensive groundwork in order to prepare his audience for Rand's corruption of character. He is "tainted," he hears voices, and there is tangible evil literally festering in his stomach.

But Rand is also the Dragon Reborn. It's a conflict that comes to a head in eighth book Path of Daggars.

Having just won Illian's crown, Rand launches a counter attack on the invading Seanchan forces that have taken over the southwest corner of Randland. By now, Rand has conquered a considerable amount of territory, but his prophesied mandate is to unite as many countries as he can before he attacks the Dark One's prison in the Blight.

Unfortunately, it's easier to defeat a Forsaken than it is to gain legitimate and stable authority over conquered territories. Chosen One or not, Rand is surrounded by vassals that plot against him. Diabolically, Rand not only launches his invasion of Seanchan territory but also surrounds himself with his most powerful "enemies. If nothing else, this is an unusual play for a fantasy author, and I have encountered more than one fellow WOT fan that couldn't take it.

To some extent, Rand is a contradiction. He may be a savior figure, but he is also a conqueror. And a politician. Rand wears a laurel leaved crown of prickly swords, which should recall Christ, but also Caesar. What if Rand ends up a tiger, burning bright, rather than a little lamb? So while Path of Daggers suffers from all of what we might call Robert Jordan's "obsessive writing disorders," I find it a notable entry in "The Wheel of Time.

However, if his gig with the One Ring doesn't work out, Frodo could probably still fall back on a career in Santa's workshop. View all 5 comments. This is one of the slowest books of the series. Usually Mat saves the day even when nobody else does anything of value in a book, but this time Mat is not here. This is especially infuriating considering that his plot line ended in a huge cliffhanger in the previous book.

Perrin's absence in book 5 is hardly noticeable; Mat's absence here is, especially considering the slow-moving overall plot. It would be unfair to say that nothing at all happens here. I counted four fairly major events in the b This is one of the slowest books of the series.

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In the beginning of the book Elaine was struggling to keep a leadership role with her motley crew: The daughter-queen was constantly in the bad mood as a result, but this part was fairly amusing and this particular subplot contained two out of the four major events I mentioned above - both expected at least one book ago. Egwene in rebel Aes Sedai camp continues manipulating others while trying not to be manipulated. What really bothers me about this whole situation is that everybody is so busy with these games that nobody cares to notice that one character really looks very suspicious and must be at least a Darkfriend she actually happens to be a Forsaken.

As it is, she keeps killing people right under everybody's noses without anybody paying attention. In contrast, the White Tower Aes Sedai actually created a secret group of Black Ajah hunters which developed its methods of detecting them and has its first catch.

I found myself sympathizing with the White Tower in this issue - to my complete surprise. Perrin starts the most annoying subplot of the series here.

Fortunately the worst part of it comes in the last chapter which means we do not get to experience it here, it will drag on and on without moving anywhere in the next two books. Rand slowly goes mad. He is also the most misunderstood character so far.

He has to act alone for the most part which brings up arrogance in his dealings with people. His plot line happens to be the most exciting one with a lot of action. This book is not bad by any means; at no point I was bored by it while reading. The problem with it is that after you finish the realization comes that not much happens here.

I gave 3 stars to worse books; this one only gets such a low rating only because it is not up to the standards of the previous ones. View all 18 comments. As with the last book, this one was a slower paced read, but there was lots to enjoy. Except for the lack of Mat. Why Robert Jordan, why?!?!? The stuff that went down: Winter is coming… - The Seanchan attack! Or Masema at the book calls him.

And Sorilea. View all 6 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Legend fades to myth and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow. This book is slowly but it flows beautiful and I love the way Jordan developed the main characters and story through the series.

Matrim Cauthon has no scene in t "The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Matrim Cauthon has no scene in this book as it makes me wonder why Jordan didn't include him in it. I always think Jordan was a very clever writer and Sanderson too. I trust Jordan as I think Jordan intended to develop the story and expanded more in the story. These books of 'The Wheel of Time' are special. It isn't much happening in this book only little but there is some interesting development in the book.

I am enjoying reading this book but I disappointed because Matrim Cauthon isn't in the book. This keeps on getting better and better! I can't get enough of this world! There're simply no words to describe this! One of the major plotlines from the past several books finally found it's resolution - the Bowl of Winds was finally used and the weather is on it's way to normal. Though I guess that going from extreme heat and drought to torrent rains and snows probably created some pretty awful problems and the consequences will reverberate throughout the world for quite awhile.

With that sudden turn the people can say goodbye to whatever crops had survived the drought. Still screwing over the Dark One's plans is always a good thing! And with that out of the way Her Royal Irresponsibility Elayne Trakand can finally get her behind back where she belongs and do what she was trained all her life to do!

And she did. But instead of being thankful to Rand who busted his a trying to keep Andor as safe as possible, she threw a tantrum and view spoiler [ ripped his banners from the Palace in Caemlyn hide spoiler ]. Ungrateful brat. I honestly have no idea why Rand likes her! The thing that annoys me most about her little snit is that just as pretty much all the problems in these books it's based on misunderstanding.

But instead of talking with each other the characters jump to conclusions and spend entire books wondering why their relationships fail. Talk to each other people! Sometimes it feels like they speak different languages! Rand's getting crazier with each book but I can't help but feel sorry for him. He's just a farmboy that got caught in a situation he never imagined. And he's trying so hard to do the right thing. I admire his dedication even if he screws up more often than not when it comes to politics.

He's biggest problem is his inability to clearly communicate what he means. I'm so glad than Min is there for him. Unlike the rest of the women around him she actually helps him cope with all that responsibility. Cadsuane and the rest of the Aes Sedai around him picked the worst possible way to approach him and try to get him to listen.

As a result they drive him farther into the madness. It's sad to see women, who should know better act like complete idiots. The Asha'man are becoming a bigger problem and if Rand doesn't establish his dominance over them soon he's going to face an army he won't be able to defeat. Part of the problem is the taint but a bigger part is Taim. Rand should have never had left the man so much leeway.

The inevitable did happen and some of the Asha'man betrayed Rand and I wonder if Taim was behind it. He speaks the right words but his actions scream resentment. I was hoping that Logain will be a countering force in the Black Tower but so far we only know he's there.

I guess that's a start. I know he's alive but I hope he's well. And that he'll show up in the next novel. Perrin had an interesting plot here and it seems he's going to be neck deep in trouble again very soon. Personally I don't think he should have abide by Masema's demand view spoiler [ and just dragged the man to Rand through a gateway.

Instead now he'll be stuck with a rabid dog, one who consorts with the view spoiler [Seanchan view spoiler [. If that's not a recipe for disaster I don't know what is. And with view spoiler [Faile a prisoner of the Shaido hide spoiler ] we might get to see the wolf's teeth in action.

As a whole TPoD is a slower book than the previous but now that I'm so emotionally invested in the story and the characters I don't mind at all. Part of me wants more action but another part wants things to remain a bit slow so I can have more time in this incredible world. My crawl through this series continues. To be honest, I'd optimistically hoped that I'd be able to finish it by the end of I was in a good position to, having already read the first five books.

Nine books in twelve months? Easy peasy. Less and less happens. The flaws stand out more as the plot thins. I've gotten through three of these books in ten months. Even if I manage to do one per month from here on out, I won't be My crawl through this series continues. Even if I manage to do one per month from here on out, I won't be getting to A Memory of Light until April though I anticipate my enjoyment increasing when Sanderson takes over, so maybe let's say March instead.

What's really frustrating about this series is that Jordan was clearly a gifted worldbuilder. Even as my enjoyment in these books decreases, it's clear that an incredible amount of thought and planning went into their creation. The level of detail on each culture, their histories, traditions and behaviors.

The ways each nation interacts with another. The ways the current situation with Rand and the Forsaken and the approaching last battle have created a complicated interlocking game of cause and effect, each player trying to seize control. But the problem here is that none of that makes for a compelling narrative. A story should not be an excuse to show off your worldbuilding. The worldbuilding should be there as support to the story, not the focus. So, so many times in this book, I found myself overwhelmed and bored by the sheer amount of superfluous characters with no arcs and no bearing on the story.

So many times characters just sit around musing on things that have happened or aren't happening or are going to happen, while nothing actually happens for hundreds of pages on end because Jordan wanted to make sure we really got that the Aes Sedai argue a lot. So what actually happened in this book? Not much. Much more in the second half than in the first, certainly. We've got: Elayne accidentally blows things up while undoing a weave, causing the rumor to spread that the Aes Sedai have a new weapon.

Elayne and Aviendha decide to officially become first sisters. They travel to Caemlyn so Elayne can take her throne. There is a traitor in their midst. Perrin and Co. They make an alliance with Alliandre. They travel to find Masema.

Perrin learns that if he yells at Faile, she will be less mad at him all the time. While Perrin is off retrieving Masema, Faile along with Alliandre and her servants, which includes Morgase in disguise are capture by the Shaido. Egwene makes her move to solidify her power with the Aes Sedai. She maneuvers so that the Hall declares war on Elaida, and the book ends with her forces Traveling to the Dragonmount. Rand is finally succumbing to the madness from the taint of Saidin. He spends the whole book trying to save face and not let anyone see how sick he is.

He is also paranoid. He is also paranoid with reason, as his own Ash'aman include traitors. They push back the Seanchan in Ebou Dar at great cost. Rand kills a bunch of people on both sides. Dashiva the Ash'aman for some reason decides to kill him when they are back in Cairhien.

Rand decides to go see Elayne so as to formalize their little polyamorous arrangement, and also he is butthurt because he thinks she doesn't like him anymore. Various interludes showcase the Forsaken, the Shaido, etc. None of them are really significant or interesting, except the one with Cadsuane, which shows she may be the one to get through to Rand who is a terrible leader , and the one at the White Tower, which shows some sisters finally beginning to make progress on identifying the Black Ajah within their ranks.

This book was pages long. At least it wasn't longer. I wish he would stop treading water and stop wasting precious narrative time on petty feuds and layovers and status updates, and give us the real goods: Unfortunately, I've been reliably informed that I've got two more books of meandering before the pace supposedly picks up again in book eleven. Lastly, I just want to talk about Rand for a sec. He was a harmlessly likable main character in book one, and only mildly irritating in book two, but since then, he has just descended into this heartless, cruel, anger-ridden character who is so incredibly uninteresting to read about.

He doesn't seem to be learning, and no one is telling him in a competent, human way that he is terrible.

Take this exchange, between Rand and Narishma. Narishma is one of his Ash'aman, and he has just come back from a perilous errand to retrieve the sword Callandor, an errand that Rand sent him on.

This is how he treats Narishma upon his return: Springing from the cot, Rand snatched the bundle before Narishma could proffer it. I expected you last night. You nearly killed me. He was sure of it. There was no point in trusting the man as far as he had, only to have him die and ruin everything.

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