The complete Sherlock Holmes Canon. From these pages you can download all the original Sherlock Holmes stories for free. PDF using individual layout. The complete Sherlock Holmes. Stories in PDF format that means that it's not allowed to make the “Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes” available for download. See terney.info˜chrender/Sherlock Holmes for an electronic form of this text and additional information about it. This text comes from the collection's.

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The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes - The complete Sherlock Holmes The_Tiger__A_True_Story_of_Vengeance_and_S_-_Vaillant,terney.info The Tiger: A. SHERLOCK HOLMES. SHORT STORIES. Sherlock Holmes is the greatest detective of them all. He sits in his room, and smokes his pipe. He listens, and. Free PDF, epub, Kindle ebook. Twelve Sherlock Holmes stories in one handy book. A Scandal In Bohemia, The Red Headed League, A Case Of Identity, The.

More books you might like: Excerpt: To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high-power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his.

The complete Sherlock Holmes

My marriage had drifted us away from each other. My own complete happiness, and the home-centred interests which rise up around the man who first finds himself master of his own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature.

He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues, and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police. From time to time I heard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa in the case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedy of the Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which he had accomplished so delicately and successfully for the reigning family of Holland.

Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion. One night—it was on the twentieth of March, —I was returning from a journey to a patient for I had now returned to civil practice , when my way led me through Baker Street.

As I passed the well-remembered door, which must always be associated in my mind with my wooing, and with the dark incidents of the Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes again, and to know how he was employing his extraordinary powers.

His rooms were brilliantly lit, and, even as I looked up, I saw his tall, spare figure pass twice in a dark silhouette against the blind. He was pacing the room swiftly, eagerly, with his head sunk upon his chest and his hands clasped behind him. To me, who knew his every mood and habit, his attitude and manner told their own story. He was at work again. He had risen out of his drug-created dreams and was hot upon the scent of some new problem. I rang the bell and was shown up to the chamber which had formerly been in part my own.

His manner was not effusive. It seldom was; but he was glad, I think, to see me.

With hardly a word spoken, but with a kindly eye, he waved me to an armchair, threw across his case of cigars, and indicated a spirit case and a gasogene in the corner. Then he stood before the fire and looked me over in his singular introspective fashion.

Legend has it that Londoners were so distraught upon hearing the news of Holmes' death that they wore black armbands in mourning. However, there is no known contemporary source for this; the earliest known reference to such events comes from In , Conan Doyle wrote "The Adventure of the Empty House", set in ; Holmes reappears, explaining to a stunned Watson that he had faked his death to fool his enemies.

Sherlock Holmes blue plaque in East Dean Holmes aficionados refer to the period from to —between his disappearance and presumed death in "The Final Problem" and his reappearance in "The Adventure of the Empty House"—as the Great Hiatus. The move is not dated precisely, but can be presumed to predate since it is referred to retrospectively in "The Second Stain", first published that year. The story features Holmes and Watson coming out of retirement to aid the war effort. Only one other adventure, " The Adventure of the Lion's Mane ", takes place during the detective's retirement.

Described by Watson in The Hound of the Baskervilles as having a "cat-like" love of personal cleanliness, Holmes is an eccentric with no regard for contemporary standards of tidiness or good order.

In many of the stories, Holmes dives into an apparent mess to find a relevant item. In " The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual ", Watson says: Although in his methods of thought he was the neatest and most methodical of mankind He had a horror of destroying documents Thus month after month his papers accumulated, until every corner of the room was stacked with bundles of manuscript which were on no account to be burned, and which could not be put away save by their owner.

He has a flair for showmanship, preparing elaborate traps to capture and expose a culprit often to impress observers.

Holmes derives pleasure from baffling police inspectors with his deductions and has supreme confidence—bordering on arrogance—in his intellectual abilities. While the detective does not actively seek fame and is usually content to let the police take public credit for his work, [38] he is pleased when his skills are recognised and responds to flattery.

In "The Adventure of the Gloria Scott" , he tells the doctor that during two years at college he made only one friend: "I was never a very sociable fellow, Watson I never mixed much with the men of my year". The detective is similarly described in A Study in Scarlet.

As shooting practice during a period of boredom, Holmes decorates the wall of his Baker Street lodgings with a "patriotic" VR Victoria Regina in "bullet-pocks" from his revolver. His enjoyment of vocal music, particularly Wagner , is evident in " The Adventure of the Red Circle ". Drug use Sidney Paget Strand portrait of Holmes for " The Man with the Twisted Lip " Holmes occasionally uses addictive drugs, especially in the absence of stimulating cases.

He uses cocaine , which he injects in a seven-percent solution with a syringe kept in a Morocco leather case.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

Although Holmes also dabbles in morphine , he expresses strong disapproval when he visits an opium den ; both drugs were legal in 19th-century England. As a physician, Watson strongly disapproves of his friend's cocaine habit, describing it as the detective's "only vice", and concerned about its effect on Holmes's mental health and intellect. Watson and Holmes both use tobacco, smoking cigarettes, cigars, and pipes. Although his chronicler does not consider Holmes's smoking a vice per se, Watson—a physician—occasionally criticises the detective for creating a "poisonous atmosphere" in their confined quarters.

In " The Problem of Thor Bridge ", the detective says, "My professional charges are upon a fixed scale. I do not vary them, save when I remit them altogether". In this context, a client is offering to double his fee, and it is implied that wealthy clients habitually pay Holmes more than his standard rate.

Although when the stories begin Holmes needed Watson to share the rent for their residence, by the time of "The Final Problem", he says that his services to the government of France and "the royal family of Scandinavia" had left him with enough money to retire comfortably.

The complete Sherlock Holmes

Attitudes towards women As Conan Doyle wrote to Joseph Bell, "Holmes is as inhuman as a Babbage 's calculating machine and just about as likely to fall in love". How can you build on such quicksand?

Their most trivial actions may mean volumes Women are never to be entirely trusted—not the best of them". In " The Lion's Mane ", Holmes writes, "Women have seldom been an attraction to me, for my brain has always governed my heart," indicating that he has been attracted to women in some way on occasion, but has not been interested in pursuing relationships with them.

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

Ultimately, however, in " The Adventure of the Devil's Foot ", he claims outright that "I have never loved". At the end of The Sign of Four, Holmes states that "love is an emotional thing, and whatever is emotional is opposed to that true cold reason which I place above all things. I should never marry myself, lest I bias my judgement. Hudson is fond of Holmes because of his "remarkable gentleness and courtesy in his dealings with women.

He disliked and distrusted the sex, but he was always a chivalrous opponent". Although this is her only appearance, she is one of only a handful of people who best Holmes in a battle of wits, and the only woman. For this reason, Adler is the frequent subject of pastiche writing. The beginning of the story describes the high regard in which Holmes holds her: To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman.

I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler As the story opens, the Prince is engaged to another. Adler slips away before Holmes can succeed. Her memory is kept alive by the photograph of Adler that Holmes received for his part in the case, and he refers to her from time to time in subsequent stories.

Well up in belladonna , opium and poisons generally. Knows nothing of practical gardening. Tells at a glance different soils from each other. After walks, has shown me splashes upon his trousers, and told me by their colour and consistence in what part of London he had received them.

He appears to know every detail of every horror perpetrated in the century. Plays the violin well. Is an expert singlestick player, boxer and swordsman. Has a good practical knowledge of British law. Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet Subsequent stories reveal that Watson's early assessment was incomplete in places and inaccurate in others, due to the passage of time if nothing else. Despite Holmes's supposed ignorance of politics, in "A Scandal in Bohemia" he immediately recognises the true identity of "Count von Kramm".

His speech is peppered with references to the Bible, Shakespeare , and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe , and the detective quotes a letter from Gustave Flaubert to George Sand in the original French. In The Hound of the Baskervilles, the detective recognises works by Martin Knoller and Joshua Reynolds : "Watson won't allow that I know anything of art, but that is mere jealousy since our views upon the subject differ".

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