The Museum of Innocence - set in Istanbul between and today - tells the story of Kemal, the son of one of Istanbul's richest families, and of his obsessive. Kemal and Sibel, children of two prominent families, are about to become engaged. But when Kemal encounters Füsun, a beautiful shopgirl and a distant relation, he becomes enthralled. Orhan Pamuk’s first novel since winning the Nobel Prize is a stirring exploration of the nature. Editorial Reviews. terney.info Review. site Best Books of the Month, November download a Kindle Kindle eBooks Kindle Unlimited Prime Reading Best Sellers & More Kindle Book Deals Free Reading Apps Kindle Singles Newsstand.

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Editorial Reviews. terney.info Review. site Best Books of the Month, November Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Literature & Fiction. It is , a perfect spring in Istanbul. Kemal and Sibel, children of two prominent families, are about to become engaged. But when Kemal encounters Füsun. This content was uploaded by our users and we assume good faith they have the permission to share this book. If you own the copyright to this book and it is.

An enchanting novel, seamlessly translated by writer Maureen Freely. LoveReading The Museum of Innocence Synopsis The Museum of Innocence - set in Istanbul between and today - tells the story of Kemal, the son of one of Istanbul's richest families, and of his obsessive love for a poor and distant relation, the beautiful Fusun, who is a shop-girl in a small boutique. The novel depicts a panoramic view of life in Istanbul as it chronicles this long, obsessive, love affair between Kemal and Fusun; and Pamuk beautifully captures the identity crisis experienced by Istanbul's upper classes who find themselves caught between traditional and westernised ways of being. For the past ten years, Pamuk has been setting up a museum in the house in which his hero's fictional family lived, to display Kemal's strange collection of objects associated with Fusun and their relationship. The museum will be called The Museum of Innocence and it opens in Please note that this draw is open only for UK residents and is free to enter, multiple entries from the same email address will only be counted once. The draw closes on 4th July The winners will be notified as soon as possible. If you loved this, you might like these All versions of this book ISBN:

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Close Report a review At Kobo, we try to ensure that published reviews do not contain rude or profane language, spoilers, or any of our reviewer's personal information. Would you like us to take another look at this review? I hated him describing how he had a pair of her white panties on display in the museum seriously??? Not cool, dude. And how he'd "mouth" certain things he stole from her?

Or how he'd try to imitate her and in some way, become Fusun? What a nut job. But, being the romantic that I am, I rooted for them to end up together in the end. And when they finally do, I was elated! This whole depressing, awful book had suddenly been worth it.

And then what happens? Fusun dies! I won't give away all the details about how that happens, but it left me feeling as if the book had been meaningless. Take two irresponsible, immature people, add sex to the equation and what do you get?

An absolute disaster. I had been excited to read this book, as I would love to see Turkey someday and thought it would be an incredible romance. But it ended up being horrible. I can't believe this book has received so many 4 or 5 star ratings. View all 5 comments. Feb 24, Peter rated it liked it Shelves: Obsession The Museum of Innocence is a novel developed with significant depth in relation to the main character, Kemal, and the obsession he has towards a beautiful woman, Fusan. Kemal never managed to secure a full relationship with Fusan because of his obliged engagement to marry Sibel.

He always remained infatuated and felt she held his heart. The obsession manifested itself through Kemal collecting objects that had a connection with her, from cigarette butts to kitchen-ware. He would collect Obsession The Museum of Innocence is a novel developed with significant depth in relation to the main character, Kemal, and the obsession he has towards a beautiful woman, Fusan. He would collect anything and everything that she encountered as though it harboured her essence, which he could derive pleasure from.

Kemal marries Sibel but he never fully commits his heart in his marriage, which he has pledged part of to Fusan. He has created this idol, which has grown in standing and adoration, that in his own mind is far superior to the reality.

This is actually really sad and I do think more could have been made of his wife's feelings, and what she contended with throughout their marriage. Over the years Kemal collects so many items that he finally establishes a museum of memorabilia devoted to Fusan. A Museum of Innocence. Or a Museum of Impotence. Depending on your grip of reality. Kemal is a very frustrating person and someone that I have very little empathy with.

While we don't have to love every character in a story it's very difficult to connect with the story when you dislike ALL the characters. On a positive note, I appreciate the opportunity to look into the mind of someone so different and wonder was his conscious and subconscious mind a driving force to, hold onto something OR fear of letting go?

So are you intrigued or frustrated, are you inspired or unimpressed, or are you wondering what other books I could have read during the time it took to read this page monster? The writing is never in question and it conveys an imaginary into Istanbul that is wonderful and atmospheric. Personally, I couldn't recommend this book and I've often wondered why I saw it through. Maybe this was the book that convinced me that Not Finishing a book is a legitimate decision.

View all 18 comments. Mar 09, Sinem A.

Saymak istemiyorum. View all 3 comments. Orhan Pamuk. Why have I waited so long to experience your writing? Because that is what this was. An experience. The Museum of Innocence has a deceitfully simple premise. Kemal Bey, from one of the wealthiest, more prominent families in Turkish society, is to be married to the lovely Sibel, daughter of a diplomat. She is well educated, beautiful, resourceful, well matched for his family even; no one can be anything but ecstatic at their engagement party, where they are on display for all of the Orhan Pamuk.

She is well educated, beautiful, resourceful, well matched for his family even; no one can be anything but ecstatic at their engagement party, where they are on display for all of the nouveau riche to see. Even worse, though Kemal through a complex series of cognitive deceptions is not aware of it at the time, his attachment to young Fusun has become so rich, so deep, so "fated", so obsessive, that the groom to be himself shares her sentiments.

Although Sibel is obviously devastated when she finds out, she remains with him for months after, trying to support his "recovery". This, of course, is not to be. He visits Fusun four to five times a week for eight years, ingratiating himself with her family; they become more family to him than his own as the years elapse.

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He even becomes friends, then business partners, with Fusun's aspiring film director husband Feridun. Serving as a cover for his frequent visits to the Kreskin household is his monetary support on Lemon Films, which in turn supports an interestingly complex but unstated understanding between Kemal and Feridun, whom are both vying for the same young lady; sadly, the more deeply felt, true love is hidden, unable to be discussed, while the neatly arranged marriage founded on convenience and something closer to an affinity is what everyone openly imagines and acknowledges.

Reading about Turkish cinema, the difficulties with the censor board, young stars trying to remain chaste in the harsh eyes of the public; Kemal and Feridun networking in local bars, Kemal and Fusun watching both Turkish and international films in classic theaters together, first with Feridun then without, first as distant cousins that avoid acknowledging each other, then looking at each other under the soft glow of lights with as much passion and devotion as any long married husband and wife, holding hands with such delicate coyness, I was reminded of something akin to Lolita, The Unbearable Lightness Of Being, Cinema Paradiso, Amelie.

There is whimsy, love, loyalty, unstated values, honor and chaste societal expectations, secrets, obsession, mystery, and many illogical decisions in the name of love. Indeed, his life is completely transformed; though his life continues, for the most part Kemal Bey lives for one purpose, one aim, one girl.

As the love story came to a conclusion, I was aware of the thought that this was the first time, at least in quite some time, that such a detailed, complex, saga-like, epic-akin storyline was written to conclusion with such perfection. It was not necessarily an expected, clear, neat ending, but any ambiguity, any decisions the author made that I did not agree with, was unable to remove the smile from my face, the warm, cozy feeling inside as if I had had a warm cup of hot chocolate.

Then, what do you know, another part of Kemal's story begins. The perfect book gets better. He outlines his single minded determination to establish The Museum Of Innocence. Pamuk insightfully forays into the psychology of collecting, collectors, their collections.

What makes these people pursue such a passion? Is it true that it is always reflective of a psychological flaw? At what point does a respected, admired endeavor become an obsession? An unappreciated flaw? Which is correct, the "proud" Western collector, whom strives to display there collections for public appreciation? The "bashful" Non-Western collector whom hides it, shunned by their peers?

This is what I cherish about fiction. Nonfiction "Elitist" Readers question the value of fiction. The right amount of disconnect from real life, what they do not realize, is necessary for full absorption of topics that may be uninteresting otherwise. There is so much more to learn, question, explore, discover in fiction in ways more beautiful than the straight facts of nonfiction can. Throughout the main novel, Kemal Bey refers to Orhan Pamuk a few times, and I loved that an author would put himself in his novel, especially when he was sometimes referred to in a negative way.

A great author should always know how to laugh at himself! His aim was to have readers really know his story, his Fusun, his life. As readers, a free admission to his Museum has been placed between to paragraphs of text in the last few pages. He tells Orhan Pamuk that the last thing that must be included in the book; what the readers need to realize, is that he, Kemal, "have lived a good life.

To portray so much, such visual imagery with seemingly so few words; to describe specific emotions with such preciseness yet eloquently. At chapters, this is a long novel. Yet I always found myself desperately looking at the pages on the right side of my hand, wishing they would always be more than those on my left! There are so many passages that I would love to quote here i. View 1 comment. From the next paragraph until the end, it will, in essence, be Orhan Bey who is telling the story.

She was the. So please don't be offended if I say I found it a bit of a struggle. View all 9 comments. I have been trying to finish this novel for such a long time. It took three tries. Third time lucky. I finally finished it. An obsessive man shares his memories of a doomed love affair in a society where East and West are fusing. There is a confusion of cultures driven by mosques on the one hand, and malls on the other, which leads to civil unrest and even war in the vibrant ancient city of Istanbul.

His ignorance of the violence playing out on the streets of the city, while pursuing his goal, does not alter his vivid descriptions of a city in transition as the cultural and political situation pendulum in daily tumult. The elaborate backdrop is the s and '80s in Turkey. The style is similar to Nabokov's Humbert and his Lolita, about a man and the woman he loves, but also his love for his city.

I can just imagine how important this novel is in the Turkish psyche, exposing the deeper state behind the religious and political mantras ruling over the inhabitants.

It serves as an open letter to a divided society, telling the truth where lies are preferred. A quest for tolerance, respect, understanding. Nevertheless, the repetitious nature of Kamul's obsession dampened my enthusiasm for this novel. There might be a lot of symbolism which got lost on me.

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It just became tedious and boring. Although it was only pages long, it felt typical of what Stephen King confessed about his own novels: However, this novel is an important literary event and deserves the many awards it has won. I'm just happy to have finished it.

It is too high to come by for me personally. View all 14 comments. It was quite an experience reading this book. At one stage i almost abandoned it as i just had too much of Kemal's obsession and it was getting a bit tiresome. However,while i was not reading the book and moved on to other books i keep thinking about it and realised it was beautifully written.

The descriptions of Istanbul life in the 's and 's were so brilliant. I would be having a coffee in my local cafe wet and damp and indoors and would start thinking about Istanbul and the warm feeling i It was quite an experience reading this book. I would be having a coffee in my local cafe wet and damp and indoors and would start thinking about Istanbul and the warm feeling i got when reading about drinking raki or Turkish Tea on the Bosphorus in the sunshine.

How cool is that! I could almost smell the Turkish tea. The only writer who effected me like that before was Hemingway although their styles are totally different. Kemal's obsession with Fusun and his robbing of little knick knacks was a bit tiresome but i am really glad i did not abandon the book and returned to complete it. Orhan Pamuk is some writer. You can see he really loves his country and his people and really goes to great lengths to let you understand Istanbul and the Turkish people.

It must have taken a lot of energy to write a book like this. I really loved this book and have three more Orhan Pamuk books lined up ready to go. View all 36 comments. I like Orhan Pamuk but he has a flaw: I feel like he narcissisticly loves what he writes. I might be wrong, but after comparing this book to his previous work this is my take, as this book was nowhere near his good books!

Mar 04, jeand99 rated it it was amazing. Aren't we all surrounded by thousands of tiny little things of the ones we love d? She looked at me with a little mysterious smile and said "Yes, you are right". I was old at the age of eight. The strange thing is this feeling never really left me.

In retrospect my opinion back than was only a part of 'homo sap Aren't we all surrounded by thousands of tiny little things of the ones we love d? In retrospect my opinion back than was only a part of 'homo sapiens' life' truth. In life it's not about milestones it's about all the days in between. It's not about being born, learn to ride a bicycle, fall in love, graduate at highschool, download a house, become a grand parent and die.

It's about the Sometimes we think we will never really fall in love. Sometimes we are in doubt about the love we feel. Sometimes we hate our lover. Sometimes it feels as if we are not good enough for our lover and need above all affirmation. Sometimes it's a perfect day full of love and being loved. Sometimes we don't think at all about our lover - and feel guilty when we realize that. What I'm trying to say is, we better: I live our life one day after another. In retrospect we can put milestones in our personal life but it's hardly sensible in the days we are living one by one.

Yesterday is one day. Today is one day.

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Tomorrow and all the other days are one day. All bookreviews tell more about the reviewer than about the writer of a book. I'm completely aware of that. Last weekend I finished reading Orhan Pamuk' book 'The museum of innocence' in a dutch translation.

From a milestone point of view this book is a bore. The setting is Istanbul, Turkey in the seventies of the 20th century. Pamuk and Sibel are both rich and are the perfect couple. Fusun is poor. I was completely addicted to the book after reading the first 20 pages.

I knew - not really but I guessed how it would end otherwise there would have been no reason for a "museum" - how the book was going to end but I loved all those thousands and thousands of tiny little lovely details of a love. A love between Kemal and Sibel. A love between Kemal and Fusun. All the hesitations, the anger, the insecurity, the perfect moments, the jealousy, the lack of affirmation, the tears, the smiles and the feeling of happiness when you just can touch her or finally see her smile while she looks at you.

I loved to read about all the "normal" days when Kemal was surrounded by things of Fusun: This is it.

This is life. For me it's a book of love in all it's tiny little elements. It's tells it all: It's not a book of milestones. It's a book of all the days in between. For me personally to found a museum for the love-of-my-life is too much.

It would be too neurotic. I'll never found a museum for the ones I loved so much and the ones I love right now. I'll never found a museum for the love-of-my-life but aren't we all surrounded by hunderds of things, books, smells, songs, thoughts and dreams of the ones we love d?

More bookreviews of this book can be found here. View all 15 comments. After finishing "The Museum of Innocence," I found myself in need to talk about it. I wanted my friends to know about this, but I wanted them to know about it slowly, in small drips, and tiny pieces. Let me tell you about it!

I rarely share stories orally and usually do not even have the patience to tell a short joke, much less listen to one. But everything about "The Museum of Innocence" was different. But what I will say is: It might make you look at life differently. In fact, this book might have a chance to ruin you.

It might seduce you and leave you with no choice to resist it, and yes, it might actually ruin you. But would I still recommend it for you?

The answer is yes. If you do not plan to read the book, then I hope we'll meet one day. I'll ask you whether you have time for a cup of coffee, and if you're willing to hear me out, I'll be happy to tell you about "the museum of innocence.

View all 16 comments. Apr 09, Lillian rated it it was ok. I'm not sure what to think of this book. I loved Pamuk's memoir, Istanbul: Memories and the City. But this novel, which covers much of the same material from a fictional perspective, with a woman, instead of a city as the focus of attention, was a frustrating read. The cataloging of every meaningful interaction with Fusun, the focus of Kemal's obsession, and the collecting of thousands of objects she touched or that are associated with her, does capture something Reading th I'm not sure what to think of this book.

Reading this novel was in many ways like sitting trapped at a table with a very self-involved person who talks endlessly about things that might be entertaining in small doses, but become mind-numbing the longer the person continues to talk.

My biggest problem with Kemal was this: So is he portraying through Kemal the West's idealized, but very limited understanding of Turkey? One very lovely idea Pamuk expounds upon through Kemal is that of the value of "sitting together" Unlike those intellectuals who deem it a solemn duty to deride the people and who believe that the millions of people in Turkey who talked of "sitting together" every evening were congregating to do nothing, I, to the contrary, cherished the desire expressed in the words "to sit together" as a social necessity amongst those bound by family ties, of friendship, or even between people with whom they feel a deep bond, though they might not understand its meaning.

View all 8 comments. Jul 07, Narcissus rated it liked it. Am devorat cartea pur si simplu. Vocea lui Kemal istorisindu-si poveste de dragoste alaturi de Fusun te cucereste pana la final.

Cartea te urmareste chiar si dupa ce ai terminat-o iti ramane acolo intiparita in minte. Desi in cele peste de pagini ale cartii nu se intampla foarte multe lucruri, intamplarile decurgand lent interesul cititorului este mentinut pana la ultima pagina.

Cititorii nu ar trebui sa se astepte la un roman siropos de dragoste cu diverse rasturnari de situatii. Actiunea cartii de desfasoara pe parcursului a de ani. Romanul este o istorie personala unde ne sunt prezentate propriile sentimente impletite cu atmosfera care domnea pe atunci in Istanbul. Suntem purtati prin diverse cartiere si strazi ale orasului, prin zone frecventate de lumea buna a Istanbulului, lumea producatorilor de film, o industrie ce se dorea a fi asemanatoare cu cea de la Hollywood.

Nu vreau sa dezvalui aici subiectul romanului, las placerea cititorului pentru a intra in poveste si a o savura pe indelete pentru ca merita.

May 18, Usman Hickmath rated it really liked it. Kemal, a 30 year old son of a wealthy Istanbul family, about to be engaged to a girl named Sibel, falls in love with an 18 year old shop girl Fusun- a distant, poorer relation of Kemal.

Fusun also confesses her love to him and disappears after attending his engagement with Sibel. In his pursuit of Fusun over the next eight years, Kemal becomes a compulsive collector of objects that records his lovelorn progress, amassing a museum. Having only two brief instances of lovemaking in a pages long Kemal, a 30 year old son of a wealthy Istanbul family, about to be engaged to a girl named Sibel, falls in love with an 18 year old shop girl Fusun- a distant, poorer relation of Kemal.

Having only two brief instances of lovemaking in a pages long novel, where protagonist is erotically and emotionally obsessed with his lover, is a courageous effort.

Such a feat can only be achieved when an author is determined to tell what he believes in and doesn't force things to spice up the story. Novel is slow and monotonous at times, but at the end it gives a satisfaction of having read a good work. Come possiamo spiegarcelo? Potrebbe avere tutto dalla vita. E nonostante lui la veda quasi ogni giorno per otto lunghissimi anni, si ritrova di fronte una sconosciuta. Orhan Pamuk lo ha creato mentre scriveva il libro, nello stesso quartiere in cui viveva la bella Fusun.

Jun 21, notgettingenough rated it it was amazing Shelves: Several years ago a neighbour gave me a bag of books, all of which I immediately discarded except this. It sat on my to read shelf for a year or so, until a long haul voyage, even worse, a long haul voyage with flu, was about to happen. Wondering what was possessing me, I put this in my bag.

Now or never. Worst case it would find a new home in Australia.

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