The Woman in Black is a horror novel by Susan Hill, written in the style of a traditional . A sequel of the book named The Woman in Black: Angel of Death was first published in the United Kingdom on 24 October and was published. The Woman in Black book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. What real reader does not yearn, somewhere in the recesses of. WOMAN IN BLACK – SUSAN HILL, retold by MARGARET TARNER .. I must forget the woman in black. I looked around. .. I took a book to read in bed. Then .

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Woman In Black Book

Revise and learn about the plot of Susan Hill's The Woman in Black with BBC Bitesize GCSE English Literature. download The Woman In Black by Susan Hill from site's Fiction Books Store. Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases and classic fiction. The Woman in Black: A Ghost Story [Susan Hill] on terney.info *FREE* Her books have won the Whitbread, the John Llewellyn Prize, and the W. Somerset.

The Woman in Black is a horror novel by Susan Hill , written in the style of a traditional Gothic novel. The plot concerns a mysterious spectre that haunts a small English town, heralding the death of children. A television film based on the story, also called The Woman in Black , was produced in , with a screenplay by Nigel Kneale. In , a theatrical film adaptation of the same name was released, starring Daniel Radcliffe. The book has also been adapted into a stage play by Stephen Mallatratt. It is the second longest-running play in the history of the West End, after The Mousetrap. The story begins with Arthur Kipps, a retired solicitor who formerly worked for Mr. One night he is at home with his wife Esme and four stepchildren, who are telling ghost stories. When he is asked to tell a story, he becomes irritated and leaves the room, and begins to write of his horrific experiences several years in the past. Many years earlier, whilst still a junior solicitor for Bentley, Kipps was summoned to Crythin Gifford, a small market town on the north east coast of England, to attend the funeral of Mrs. Alice Drablow. The late Drablow was an elderly and reclusive widow who lived alone in the desolate and secluded Eel Marsh House. The house is situated on Nine Lives Causeway. At high tide, it is completely cut off from the mainland, surrounded only by marshes and sea frets.

It is short as horror books go, but far too long for what it has to say. View all 36 comments. I said in another review that I'm near impossible to scare because my parents were relaxed with horror movie censorship when I was a young kid. I was oversaturated with horror from a young age and tend to find it more laughable than spine-tingling. However, this book may be the only exception I have found so far. In recent years I have flat-out avoided horror stories because they do nothing for me I can stomach Stephen King but only because his books tend to be about more than the basic horror I said in another review that I'm near impossible to scare because my parents were relaxed with horror movie censorship when I was a young kid.

I can stomach Stephen King but only because his books tend to be about more than the basic horror element. For me to find this book, a book that is entirely a horror story, to be so enjoyable and so frightening is quite incredible. I don't need to tell you what it's about, you can read that in countless descriptions, but I do need to say just how much this scared me and had me sleeping with the light on all night and jumping up at every single creak and sigh.

The image of the woman stood in the marshes with her face wasting away is so vividly described that it was all I could picture for days, I kept looking over my shoulder when I was by myself expecting to see her stood there in her long black cloak. This lady does very little and is still probably the most frightening character I've ever come across in a novel. I would not recommend you read this while alone in the house View all 26 comments.

May 30, Cecily rated it it was amazing Shelves: A chilling, traditional ghost story, with a strong Victorian feel: No great surprises, but shocking none-the-less. It is skilfully written, so that most of the scary stuff happens in your head, rather than being explicit on the page. NARRATOR Arthur Kipps, the main character and the narrator is very pragmatic and always tries to dismiss his fears and find a rational explanation, which serves to make his A chilling, traditional ghost story, with a strong Victorian feel: NARRATOR Arthur Kipps, the main character and the narrator is very pragmatic and always tries to dismiss his fears and find a rational explanation, which serves to make his story more believable — and thus more alarming.

All the way through, his greatest need is to uncover the truth, however unpalatable it may be. His feelings towards her change from concern through fear to anger. Kipps himself is a bit of a birdwatcher, and different birds make fleeting appearances: The bigger mystery is when it is set. If you like it, The Turn of the Screw is in a similar vein.

View all 49 comments. Rating Clarification: Disappointing and predictable, this Gothic ghost story isn't a patch on the classics of the genre such as Henry James' The Turn of the Screw. Part of the problem with the tension was that it was all so predictable I didn't even feel the need to check the ending like I usually do.

In othe Rating Clarification: In other words the suspense wasn't killing me. Not that the actual story was at fault as such, it was more that the author seemed to give away too much too soon and didn't manage to drip feed bits of the story to the reader in such a way to make it a compelling page turner. I was also left with various questions at the end, some silly some not. For instance, when was it set?

The writer appeared to be trying for a classic Victorian tone, but there were mentions of motor cars and electric lights. My guess was Edwardian, but I can't be sure. Also, I was left wondering how on earth there was electricity at all out at the isolated Eel Marsh House. No mention was ever made of a generator, the narrator just flicked switches even though the house was unoccupied when he arrived.

While these questions and some others which involve spoilers so I won't mention them here may not amount to major plot holes, they did niggle and distract which is never a good thing, especially in this type of book.

Despite my disappointment in the book, I still hold out hope for the movie. From what I've seen in the trailers, it looks like the film embraces the full horror of the classic Victorian ghost story which is something the book failed to do. The potential was there but it was just never realized by the author. View all 28 comments. A very good ghost story with creepy sounds, a marsh with lots of fog and danger, and a haunting revengeful spirit.

I was all set to give this book a strong 3 stars until the last chapter's chilling, horrid surprise ending. Now I can't wait to see the movie with Daniel Radcliffe. View all 29 comments. You know, what I love about British ghost stories are that they are so understated, like everything else in the country.

They don't come bellowing and and dripping gory entrails - they creep upon you, and whisper "boo" almost apologetically in your ear. I think M. James started this trend, and all others seem to be following it. Susan Hill starts her novel, "The Woman in Black", showing Arthur Kipps, an elderly lawyer and the first person narrator, having a quiet Christmas Eve with his family.

However, we are given a hint of the tragedy in Kipps' life, when he casually mentions his status as a widower in his early twenties.

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When his stepchildren ask him to narrate a ghost story, the normally sedate lawyer becomes extremely agitated and walks out - because the children have touched a raw nerve.

For there is a very real ghost in Arthur Kipps' past. As a young man, Arthur is sent to the market town of Crythin Gifford by his boss; to attend the funeral of their client Mrs.

The Woman in Black

Alice Drablow and to sort out her papers, as she has no heirs. Drablow lived at Eel Marsh, connected to the mainland by the Nine Lives Causeway and approachable only at low tide: Kipps thinks nothing of it until he finds that the locals at Crythin Gifford gives the house a long berth and refuse to discuss anything regarding its owner. Things take a turn for the worse when Arthur sights a woman dressed all in black, with a wasted and ravaged face - apparently a ghost.

Ignoring his misgivings, the young lawyer takes up residence at the house on Eel Marsh, but is unable to complete his work as the haunting grows stronger and scarier. Apart from the woman in black, there is a ghostly horse and trap not seen but only heard which keeps on plunging into the marsh, accompanied by a child's wail: He escapes-but the horror follows him Susan Hill does a masterly job with the voice of the narrator, which is very much Victorian hard to believe that the novel was written in This is absolutely essential, as the horror is very much period and a modern voice would have totally spoilt it.

It is not the ghostly visitations itself that scares one in the novel though they are sufficiently creepy but the tone of quiet despair and the starkness of the tragedy. This story, like Stephen King's Cujo , doesn't let the reader escape even after the book is put away - though the author leavens the horror by starting from a point in the protagonist's future when the tragedy has been put behind.

However, the ending is sufficiently devastating for it to stay with one for days. An excellent read to start the year! View all 13 comments. What I heard next chilled and horrified me The noise of the pony trap grew fainter and then stopped abruptly and away on the marsh was a curious draining, sucking, churning sound, which went on, together with the shrill neighing and whinnying of a horse in panic and then I heard another cry, a shout a terrified sobbing A short novel that really should have but didn't pack a punch, it had Most of the elements for the type of ghost story I normally am drawn to, the fog-shrouded house set on the outskirts of a remote English Village where sightings here and there of a ghostly lady all dressed in black The characters were bland and I felt the book a little predictable and repetitive.

Having loved The Silent Companions perhaps I was expecting too much from this novel. An ok read but not a book that will cause me any nightmares. View all 9 comments.

The start of the book reminded me of The Turn of the Screw as this also starts with a similar narration pattern and both these stories revolve around an isolated house. But that is where the similarity ends.

The setting of 'Eel Marsh House' is spooky, it is foggy surrounded by marshes and the accessibility to the house is blocked during high tide Arthur see's Th 2. Arthur see's The Woman in Black and then start's experiencing unusual things. The paranormal angle of this is interesting but not as creepy even though it involves The Woman in Black This was a quick read and the ending took me by surprise view spoiler [When Arthur got away from Eel Marsh and Crythin Gifford, I thought he has got away but the Woman in Black took her revenge hide spoiler ] Wonderfully, spooky, tragic story.

The narrator does a frighteningly good job of conveying the absolute horror that young Arthur Kipp experiences when he travels on behalf of his legal firm to tie up the loose ends of a client who has died. Eel House stands deserted and only accessible twice a day with the low tide.

Plot summary - Revision 1 - GCSE English Literature - BBC Bitesize

He has no idea what he is going to find when he plans on staying at the malevolent house under the hateful, evil watch of the deadly woman in black. Arthur has no idea that seeing he Wonderfully, spooky, tragic story.

Arthur has no idea that seeing her will haunt him for the rest of his life. I loved listening to this probably more than I would have liked reading it. A chilling ghost story to get into the Halloween spirit. View all 7 comments. This hardcover book is copy 40 of Plus 20 copies for contributors printed and signed by: View 2 comments. May 07, Leo. However, it happened, and I will not lie that my expectations have been adjusted accordingly.

While the book is horror, the movie is horror horror horror, tragic past combined with morbidly saturated cine 3. While the book is horror, the movie is horror horror horror, tragic past combined with morbidly saturated cinematography sprinkled with heart-stopping pop-outs galore.

The facts are there, but the plot is vastly different, one phrase of the book playing a much larger role and, indeed, the setting the mood and thematic content for the entirety. In short, the book is nicer, and while I don't agree with the Jane Austen comparison at all, I did admire the spectrum of emotions and thoughts the main character experienced; an authorial sensitivity to human psychology at both the highs and the lows that you don't often come across in literature as a whole.

The balance between cheerful normality and burgeoning dread was well developed one, but ended up sacrificing the more poignant extremes of the movie horrors for its focus on stability. I wasn't a fan of being scared out of my wits every five minutes, but as it is horror, and there were certain masterfully handled cinematic scenes that I was disappointed to not discover in the book, I could have handled a little more thrills and chills.

Other reviews have spoken of Hill's talent at writing mood, and while I do emphatically agree with that, I'm someone who's childhood reading was half Tolkien and half Stephen King. If you want to scare me via paper these days, you need to provide a little more visceral imagery than descriptions of internal panic and full bodied terror.

Accurate replication of the feelings of fear are all very well, but real terror will strike only when you give me something physical to envision view spoiler [, a movie favorite of mine being the main character stepping up to a window, our view from the opposite side allowing us, and only us, to watch with horror the ghostly visage coming up alongside him.

That scene sold me on the trailer, and later on the movie as a whole hide spoiler ]. Neither the book nor the movie end well, but when it comes to the overcast of nervous paranoia chasing the reader or viewer long after the finishing, the book had the movie beat.

The movie's extended use of the book's main point of fear view spoiler [, children dying in horribly gruesome ways and coming back to haunt forevermore, hide spoiler ] ended up sucking the life out of the original shock, while the book saved up its cards till the moment was right. This made for a far more full-fledged sense of 'you reap what you sow' that pushed up this reader's evaluation that final half star.

View all 4 comments. I liked the way this was written and read it quite quickly. It wasn't as scary as I had anticipated - having seen the film adaptation starring Daniel Radcliffe which I enjoyed I suppose I couldn't help but compare the two. I actually think I preferred the film just a bit more, but the book was strong. I loved the dog, Spider a lot. She really added something to the story. The ending was great, though I won't be specific as to why.

It hit me quite hard, even though it came with a strong sense I liked the way this was written and read it quite quickly. It hit me quite hard, even though it came with a strong sense of the inevitable. View all 12 comments. Every November we used to play and go in someone's houses and go hunting the ghost that lurks. It seems that I read the book earlier than what I have thought.

I can feel the tingle of the cold and smell of the estuary. The dead is coming and hunting me again a little earlier than what I thought. When Arthur Kipps asked to summon and attend a funeral of Mrs. Alice Drablow , the inhabitant and owner of Eel Marsh House, secrets and lies behind the four walls of the house went blown through the atmosp Every November we used to play and go in someone's houses and go hunting the ghost that lurks. Alice Drablow , the inhabitant and owner of Eel Marsh House, secrets and lies behind the four walls of the house went blown through the atmosphere of the story.

Because of Arthur Kipps ' curiosity, he manages to dig the stories and the ghost of the mysterious woman in black that hunted the town since 60 years ago. God, if only I read this book at night I might shrivel to death or shout for help. This is very amazing and this is the only horror book I read that I'm dying to admit that I did like it.

The construction of the story is perfect and I keep on asking about the mystery of the story until it came out and revealed. I was so shocked that I want to tear the book and edited it on my own.

The sentences are beautifully written, they rhymed through the story and it keeps my imagination clearer than before. I can hear Susan Hill narrating it for me and my heart is keep on jumping every syllable. It was amazing, yes, and I recommend this to all people who wants to read horror book this coming November. She usually use a lot of adjectives and beware of it guys, and of course a lot of punctuation marks in between but those thing never hurdled me from reading it.

The mystery, it was so good-ie that I'll choose Susan Hill 's horror books than the detective one. I am a little bit unfair but seriously I can't keep bugging myself from time to time.

Anyway, I suggest everyone have to wear thick jackets or any comforter because you can feel the bitterness of the ghost. For Peter , who suggested this book to Flippers , kudos for you for sharing it and you always had the best gothic novels! I'm off for the book discussion. Review posted on Old-Fashioned Reader. Book for View all 14 comments. Apr 13, Bradley rated it really liked it Shelves: In an age the 80's when horror was at its peak and ravening monsters of supernatural and human types ravaged the bookstores, Susan Hill decided to write a Victorian ghost story using modern sensibilities but the distinctive flair of the classics.

Since then, it's enjoyed modest popularity and I don't doubt why. It's simple and direct. It tugs at the heartstrings, from sympathy and shared horror to the mystery and even the heartwarming companionship of a plucky dog on the moor during the darkest In an age the 80's when horror was at its peak and ravening monsters of supernatural and human types ravaged the bookstores, Susan Hill decided to write a Victorian ghost story using modern sensibilities but the distinctive flair of the classics.

It tugs at the heartstrings, from sympathy and shared horror to the mystery and even the heartwarming companionship of a plucky dog on the moor during the darkest hours.

And then there's the expected and satisfying twist at the end that is the core of all classic ghost stories. I really don't have any complaints because it was amusing and craftily wrought, but make no mistakes Expect all the classic tropes performed magically well.

Das Ende war ab einem bestimmten Punkt des Buches relativ vorhersehbar, aber trotzdem gut. Gucke mir die Tage den Film an: View 1 comment. I was very disappointed with this book. It's much shorter than I thought it was going to be, for one. That's my fault for not checking to see how many pages it was. I found the prose to be overly descriptive. I get it, the house is located in a marsh by the sea. I get it that there is fog. I get it that the only road to the house is underwater during high tide.

Enough already, where is the woman?

The Woman in Black by Susan Hill

Even when the woman shows up, the story continues to be boring. I did not fi 2. I did not find this book to be even remotely scary. There were a couple of chilling scenes and that was about it. If you are looking for a good scare, look somewhere else. View all 6 comments. The secluded house is effective and creepy whilst the reason of the haunting is incredibly chilling.

Lectura con el grupo b Baker street "La forma de desterrar a un viejo fantasma que sigue apareciendo consiste en exorcizarlo. Dejando de lado el gore que actualmente abunda en el ambiente del terror en todas sus formas , en esta novela la am Lectura con el grupo b Baker street "La forma de desterrar a un viejo fantasma que sigue apareciendo consiste en exorcizarlo. Es una novela que se centra en las descripciones, carente en gran medida de dialogos y cuyo fuerte se encuentra en las descripciones.

A pseudo-Victorian gothic ghost story that has a very un-Victorian length of pages. To be honest, it's not very good. It reminds me of 14 year old me when I started reading things like Dracula, Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre and thinking 'there's not much to this writing a classic novel business- I should give it a try'. Cue the dull, rational protagonist lawyer or doctor obviously who is thrown into some spooky goings-on and slowly becomes undone in such default settings Hmm.

Cue the dull, rational protagonist lawyer or doctor obviously who is thrown into some spooky goings-on and slowly becomes undone in such default settings as spooky misty moore or haunted house.

What I didn't understand when I was 14, as Susan Hill doesn't seem to understand in the 's when this was written, is that imitation is not all that flattering when it comes to novel writing. This story is displaced in time, adding nothing, and doing nothing.

The Woman in Black Series

It is a cliche from beginning to end. Look up a list of all the features needed to create a Gothic novel and you can tick them off on a checklist whilst reading it. And if you're thinking, like me, that there is going to be a huge, redeeming twist at the end that throws everything that comes before it into a riotous question mark It really is trying to be a legitimate Gothic novel.

It doesn't even have an interesting, dubious protagonist ala 'The Turn of the Screw'. It is really However, saying all this you are probably wondering why I have even given it two stars. Embarrassingly enough, this silly ghost story gave me the creeps a little bit. So it partly did it's job I guess. The story has to be told, but must be difficult to tell. In the opening of this narrative the storyteller talks of coming out "from under the long shadow cast by the events of the past".

At its end, the storyteller has managed a difficult task. Thus the book's terse concluding sentences: "They asked for my story. I have told it. Or you could think that it shows him still possessed by the fears that the story has re-awakened. As a young man, Arthur, then a junior solicitor in a London law firm, was sent to the remote town of Crythin Gifford to sort out the papers of a recently dead client of the firm, Mrs Alice Drablow.

Of course she had lived in a gloomy mansion — Eel Marsh House — cut off from the village by a causeway that is only passable at low tide. Of course the locals are fearful of the place and yet highly reluctant to talk of their fears. Readers will recognise some of the conventional properties of this highly conventional form: the art of the author is to turn our expectations into apprehension.

Arthur the storyteller recalls his own youthful scepticism — "I did not believe in ghosts" — but we know that the person who tells the story has been made to think differently. In a time-honoured generic pattern, this ghost story throws a particular light on the storyteller, asking us to notice not just what happens in his narrative, but what has happened to him. He confesses near the opening of his tale that "for many years now" his spirits have been "excessively affected by the ways of the weather".

Something has happened to him, we infer, to produce this "susceptibility". It is another way back into the past. For in the story that he eventually tells, the weather will be a disturbingly active element. In the story, the much younger Arthur stumbles after the truth of the narrative into which he has been thrust. What has happened in this house?

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