Genre/Form: Fiction Psychological fiction. Additional Physical Format: Print version: Glynn, Alan, Dark fields. New York: Bloomsbury, The dark fields by Alan Glynn; 4 editions; First published in ; DAISY for print-disabled Download ebook for print-disabled (DAISY). This content was uploaded by our users and we assume good faith they have the permission to share this book. If you own the copyright to this book and it is.

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Read "Dark Fields" by T.J. MacGregor available from Rakuten Kobo. Private investigator Quin St. James plies her trade in Miami, in the s. She thinks she's. And when Eddie tries to trace the other users, he discovers the terrifying truth " The Dark Fields" is a feverish reading experience that lingers in your mind long. Rent and save from the world's largest eBookstore. Read, highlight, and take Review: The Dark Fields. User Review - William QR code for The Dark Fields.

He starts using MDT, an experimental drug granting heightened intellectual, creative, and learning powers, and enabling its user to see meaningful patterns in large amounts of disparate data. Using his newly acquired intellect, Edward amasses a small fortune short selling technology stocks. However, his indiscriminate use of the drug leads to panic attacks and blackouts. He further learns the full scope of the side-effects from his ex-wife Melissa, who had dabbled in the substance and suffered permanent neurocognitive damage, prompting him to gradually discontinue use of the drug. Edward initially reduces his intake to half a pill a day, but this quickly proves insufficient to maintain the level of mental acumen required to work out the details of the merger, and he is forced to increase the dosage. Realizing he is on a treadmill of addiction , Edward tracks down another user, from whom he learns of the existence of a drug, readily available over the counter, capable of negating some of the harmful side-effects.

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The Dark Fields

Total Silence. Cold as Death. Category Five. U R Mine. Tango Key. Kill Time. Sep 07, Brooke rated it really liked it Shelves: You will possibly know this as the Bradley Cooper movie Limitless if you go searching for the book, look it up under the movie's title - I don't think it's published under the original title any longer.

The main character, Eddie Spinola, acquires some medication that makes him insanely smart. He absorbs information and processes it so quickly that he learns new languages in a day and is able to play the stock market like a toy xylophone.

Unfortunately, the drug has its downsides as well, as on You will possibly know this as the Bradley Cooper movie Limitless if you go searching for the book, look it up under the movie's title - I don't think it's published under the original title any longer.

Unfortunately, the drug has its downsides as well, as one might imagine. Unexpectedly, this book reminded me of American Psycho quite a bit, especially when Eddie relates his interactions with people who are hanging off his every word. It's not so much that Eddie shares Patrick Bateman's sociopathic tendencies, but they share a similar tone when narrating their day-to-day thoughts and concerns.

While not a sociopath, though, it IS pretty clear that the drugs suppress Eddie's conscience and moral compass - and I'll also add that the author does a great job showing this fact rather than ever telling us about it. Definitely worth a read, but the movie is probably more fun due to Bradley Cooper's presence. View 2 comments. I decided to read the novel because I enjoyed the movie so much. I had taken my family to the movie and they really enjoyed it too. Had the movie been true to the book, I don't think that would've been the case.

I believe the changes were done intentionally so that the movie would have much more entertainment value.

I agree wholeheartedly with the reviewer who praised Alan Glynn for the research he did on the various subjects touched on in the book. It very much feels when you read the book that I decided to read the novel because I enjoyed the movie so much. It very much feels when you read the book that the writer is knowledgeable about the topics and about Manhattan.

I have long been a student of peak potential and have read several books on the subject by Tony Robbins, Robin Sharma, Stephen Covey, etc. Whether or not a substance like MDT exists, there is no question in my mind through my own experience with my development and that of family, friends, colleagues and others that we can approach a state of "limitlessness" by doing certain things.

In the book, you'll notice that these certain things include: And based on this impact, I found the book entertaining and inspirational. I'm glad I read the book. They shouldn't have changed the title to match "the Movie", as the two stories are barely connected by names.

The book is The book does a reasonable job of exploring the practical complications of the question "If I am my mind, and chemistry changes my mind, am I still me? The book is a cautionary tale, the movie a paen to chemical technology. I'm no luddite; I'm just saying the book and the movie inhabit opposite ends of a spectrum.

I even enjoyed both of them.

The bad guy of the book is a completely different Another jarring thing about the movie is that in the end, Eddie goes on to "win", but there's no retribution for the apparent murder of a woman. I enjoyed both vehicles, but the book is a much deeper, thought provoking, practical examination of a current philosophical issue, and the movie is - well, just fun.

I think having seen the movie, made the book less enjoyable, all the key plot points are in the movie; minus all the long drawn out jargon that the author uses. In the end the movie is much more enjoyable. View all 8 comments. Apr 09, Jennifer Willis rated it really liked it.

Dark Fields – book scan, ebook format, ebook cover | Ebook Services

If you were offered a pill that would make you smarter, more focused and infinitely more productive, would you take it? Would you bother to ask about the side effects first? Protagonist Eddie Spinola isn't initially told what this tiny pill will do for -- or to -- him, but he knocks back the MDT anyway, and his life immediately becomes a thrilling and unmanageable roller coaster.

I've not seen the movie, "Limitless," based on this book by Alan Glynn.

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The film previews got me interested in the If you were offered a pill that would make you smarter, more focused and infinitely more productive, would you take it? The film previews got me interested in the story, and when I heard about how it only came to Hollywood's attention when some movie professional found a copy of "The Dark Fields" in a bookstore bargain bin, I knew I had to seek out this title for myself. It's a great read. Glynn tells an engaging, page-turning story.

I was stopped in my tracks here and there by non-standard according to U. English spellings and punctuation conventions -- Glynn lives in Ireland -- but I was also deeply impressed by the sheer amount of research the author must have done in the preparation and writing of this novel.

He goes into deep detail as he weaves all manner of topics into his story -- from conversational Italian and the principles of 20th-century design to the intricacies of day-trading on the stock market and broadband media corporate mergers.

Glynn definitely did his homework, and his story is all the better for it. But throughout the book, the question remains: If you had such a drug available, what would you do?

Toward the end of the extensive exhibit -- full of information about the brain's anatomy and biochemistry, evolution, how we learn and process information and languages, etc. One display panel talked about advances in pharmacology allowing us to enhance natural abilities and cognitive functions, sort of like steroids for the brain. The exhibit posed a tantalizing and troubling question for conversation: Eddie Spinola's story in "The Dark Fields" may serve as a cautionary tale of the dangers of untested and unregulated neuropsychopharmacology -- that's not really a spoiler, since you know from the very first page that Eddie's in trouble -- but I also wonder if a drug like MDT were truly safe, what people might be able to do with or on it.

Maybe Eddie's problem was that he focused solely on his own gain, rather than trying to make the world a better place, and that the drug didn't and couldn't help him resolve the feelings of unworthiness that lay at his core.

I'm also steering clear of the obvious theme of addition here. I have no doubt that there will be -- or may already be -- Eddie Spinolas out in the world as the quiet race for the perfect smart drug continues.

I've deliberately not answered the central question of the book -- what would I do? And because, frankly, I'm not sure. The book was originally published in and was called The Dark Fields. I have to admit, I was completely drawn in right from the very beginning.

Eddie Spinola is a bit of a noone. He is single, living in a small messy apartment and not exactly realising his dreams. Nothing could have prepared him for what happens next. I need it NOW! The idea of being able ot take a pill that literally spurs you into action without feeling mentally, emotionally or physically drained is just so appealing. OK, so there were rather tragic side-effects, but the whole point of drugs is that you believe that YOU would be able to control it.

This wasn't a very good book, because it was not very well-written, not because the concept was poor. There is a drug that makes you all you can be. You are productive, driven, creative, and you can learn very fast. This makes you usually rich and powerful and thin. You suffer blackouts well, you do this even while on the drug, and sometimes get aggressive and kill people and don't remember it , have headaches, insomnia This wasn't a very good book, because it was not very well-written, not because the concept was poor.

You suffer blackouts well, you do this even while on the drug, and sometimes get aggressive and kill people and don't remember it , have headaches, insomnia and lose your ability to focus and concentrate — so you end up stupider than when you started. This is a great idea! And how the protagonist comes across a stash, and what the consequences are, etc. But the author tackles this from a scientific and technical and business angle. He barely even touches on the many interesting psychological, mental and philosophical matters that are brought up by the use of this drug.

Very sad to see such a great idea wasted. When I first started this book, I wrote: This book is blowing me away. If the movie is half as good as this I'll be surprised! Then I got mid way through maybe not even midway and while the action scenes were page turners, the author had a tendency to give excruciating details about what Eddie Spinola great character name!

It was like a condensed history lesson about things I could care less about and that did not further the story alo When I first started this book, I wrote: It was like a condensed history lesson about things I could care less about and that did not further the story along. I tried really hard to slough through, but I finally gave up. Giving my disappointment with the book, I'm hoping the movie will be better.

Limitless was based upon an interesting concept: The drug also has some interesting side effects: Eddie v Limitless was based upon an interesting concept: Eddie visits his friend to get more of this amazing drug.

His friend ends up murdered and Eddie swipes his stash of MDT along with a notebook with what Eddie assumes are lists of his customers. He can converse on any topic and everywhere he goes he is the center of attention. He decides that he is going to invest in the stock market and with his abilities should be able to make a fortune.

This is the part of the book that really bogged down. There was a lot of info about day trading and Eddie gets tied up with a billionaire who is about to merge with another company. There were a couple of things that bothered me about this book. First that Eddie never seemed to think about what he was going to do when the drug ran out. I liked that it was written in first-person — I really got a sense of the effect this drug had on him.

And there was a surprising, unexpected twist at the end. This book is a definite page-turner for me. I am reading this book after seeing the movie several months ago. I notice that many parts were interpreted in the movie and I am recieving a whole new insight on the plot of the story.

It is interesting to see the differences between the film and the book. Limitless is a great example of the word Automaton. The dictionary definition for Automaton states the following: The first time I notice this is when he first takes the pill. Eddie returns to his apartment, and over the course of several hours manages to clean his whole apartment and write a great majority of the book he is working on.

Later on that night he crashes and realizes what he has done leading him to want more. Over the course of the book he begins to take more pills which leads to more astonishing events.

Eddie realizes that he needs the pill or else he begins to feel very slowed down. The idea of this pill is a very interesting concept to me and so far I have enjoyed reading about it. Although there is a lot of dialogue in this book at times, which I tend to fine boring for the most part, Alan Glynn does a great job of tying it into the story to keep things interesting, which I enjoy. Normally I would not care for a fictional novel, but this one really intrigues me and makes me want to continue reading.

Definently one of the greater books I have read. I still have some chapters to go, and I hope my enjoyment continues throughout reading this.

I would definently recommend this book to anyone who is interested in suspenseful reads. Jun 24, David Lucero rated it really liked it. I saw this movie because the main character was a writer, burnt out and clueless. As a writer myself I can say I know the feeling.

Anyway, I wasn't too thrilled about watching the movie because Bradley Cooper was the lead actor. It's not that I don't think he's any good, but rather he played the role of creep in 'Wedding Crashers' so well that whenever I saw him in another role I couldn't shake the character he played in Wedding Crashers. Well, that has all been erased. Not only did Cooper do a I saw this movie because the main character was a writer, burnt out and clueless.

Not only did Cooper do a good job in the movie version, I loved it so much I decided to read the book the movie was based on. Fortunately, the movie follows the book very much, which I like. Eddie Spinola is a burnt-out writer who's lost. He can't figure out how to begin his new book and his life seems to be going nowhere. A chance encounter with his ex-brother in-law a former drug dealer introduces him to a new drug with the potential of bringing the very best out of you.

The best it brings out of you is enhanced form of thinking. The drug enables the user to access all of their brain capacity. The potential is limitless. But when Eddie begins feeling the side effects he begins to wonder if this was too good a thing. He can't sleep, he vomits, doesn't eat, can't remember what his past actions are. Soon this wonder drug makes him wonder if it's the end of his life. If you saw the movie 'Limitless' the title of the movie based on Glynn's book you will enjoy this book.

It goes into more detail about this type of drug, which has actually been promoted before. You'll find it very enjoyable. It has humor, drama, mystery, action, and suspense, everything a novel needs to be worth your time. David Lucero, author www. I'm wavering between 2 and 3 stars on this one.

I love the premise, the idea - and it's not far-fetched at all - that a pill could help us utilise our full mental potential. How addictive that would be!

Glynn's writing is good as are his characters. If anything he overdid the research in my opinion: For me he should have summed this all up in one paragraph: For the next couple of months I analysed and I'm wavering between 2 and 3 stars on this one.

For the next couple of months I analysed and mastered the stock market, earning myself a shit-load of money - and then moved on. And then there's the story's ending, which I'm pleased to hear was rewritten for the film. Yes, the ending is true to life, but this is fiction, not life, so I believe it should have been a bit more hopeful.

Glynn could have done so much more with this great idea. Still, it's worth reading if for no other reason than it makes you think. SciFi urban mystery fans. This was very similar to the movie. I had actually seen Limitless before I read the book and as I'd loved the film wasn't sure at all how the book would hold up. I loved it. The come down is a total bitch! I loved the characters, and its was wonderful seeing in my mind Bradley Cooper as Eddie Spinola.

The book moves at a fast pace and when the deaths and confusion start it go from good to excellent. I picked this book up on a whim as I had seen the film a while ago and hadn't realised that it was actually based on a book. The story is told from the point of view of Eddie Spinola, your average heading towards mid-life crisis type of guy, who is suddenly given the chance to turn his life around with a mystery drug provided by his ex brother in law.

The sudden improvement in his ability to think and do things that seemed to be beyond him before provides for an exhilarating ride as he explores t I picked this book up on a whim as I had seen the film a while ago and hadn't realised that it was actually based on a book.

The sudden improvement in his ability to think and do things that seemed to be beyond him before provides for an exhilarating ride as he explores the potential for this brain enhancement drug I even started tidying my room up in between reading, it had that effect.

Of course, everything comes with a downside as Eddie starts having memory lapses, during which time he may or may not have seriously injured a person.

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With his drug supply limited by the murder of his brother in law, he decides to stop using the drug and immediately hits some serious withdrawal issues. This section was depressing to read as you can just feel Eddie's abilities ebbing away, Flowers for Algernon style and he practically becomes a zombie. The final part of the story, where Eddie is back on a more controlled dosage of the drug, follows a more familiar route as he tries to track down the truth about the drug, and is threatened by people who want in on his secrets.

The ending is a downbeat one as opposed to the film , where he finally glimpses the scale of the conspiracy behind the drug, amidst a backdrop of war as the USA invades Mexico rather prescient to what is going on today in the US elections, considering it was written in Just don't let certain presidential candidates read this book.

The whole story is set in flashback, told rather simply and directly as Eddie writes down exactly what has happened to him over the months that the story is set. The writing style deliberately echoes Eddie's state of mind over this period, and it becomes clear that what you are reading is with the benefit of hindsight and with a mind free of the drug. The book, originally called The Dark Fields but renamed here to reflect the film title, possibly fails to live up to it's exhilarating first part but it has a lot to say about unfulfilled dreams and how it is too tempting for many to cheat, lie, steal or even kill to get what you want without really earning it.

It has some important points to make about personal responsibility where being morally reprehensible is often seen as a virtue, particularly in the business world. A very entertaining book. A vivid imagery of time lapsed reality distorted by fragmented moments both out of body and out of character. MDT, a designer drug for the intellect and recollection becomes the quick addiction of Eddie Spinola transforming him from a struggling author of sorts into a high powered stock market trader and broker of multimillion dollar company mergers.

LIMITLESS is one of those books where you know the world is going to come crashing down on the lead character and all you can do it wait for the cataclysmic event to end it all. Be it gangsters hell bent on acquiring the drug, evasive and mysterious drug companies monitoring every moment, or the law seeking justice for a murder - all paths lead in one direction. Mar 20, Rebecca rated it liked it. I didn't see the movie, though it looked somewhat interesting.

I'll catch it when it's on FX in like 3 years. In the meantime, I found out that the movie was based on a book! So instead of waiting for the movie, I picked up the book for free to see what the plot was all about. Yeah, it was pretty much what I expected. I actually thought the book would be worse then it was and it really wasn't awful.

I wish the author dove more into the history of the drug or what happened to all the people that I didn't see the movie, though it looked somewhat interesting. I wish the author dove more into the history of the drug or what happened to all the people that were taking it, but it kind of glossed over that part, which I am sure was part of the mystery and he wanted the reader to come to their own conclusions, etc, about what happens when you get hooked on something "bad" for you. The book was kind of all over the place and would spend a few chapters taking about one aspect of the story people taking the drug and then jump over to the main character and see how he was doing with the drug.

Better then I thought, which is pretty high praise for a book like this. Mar 05, Internet rated it really liked it.

Basically a modern retelling of Flowers for Algernon, moreso than the movie. I enjoyed the inspiring "zero to hero" story in the first half. One or two moments struck me as a neckbeard's fantasy such as when Eddie impresses a girl by telling her about the mechanics of wind and how it's formed. Yet it has a merit of truth to it, because depending on how you say something--the more charismatic you are, the more interested the listener is.

In the second half I was questioning almost all of Eddie's ac Basically a modern retelling of Flowers for Algernon, moreso than the movie. In the second half I was questioning almost all of Eddie's actions, even when he is on the smart drug. It was very clear that his fall was coming and it was painful to read. I suppose it was necessary for the plot and believable to the extent that arrogance can be blinding.

Despite the pain of reading it, the second half was just as gripping. The plot culminates in an ironic way that brought to mind other classics such as Crime and Punishment.

Very different from the movie's ending, all the different subplots Eddie deals with throughout the novel tie together nicely in the last few pages. Nov 06, Natalie K.

I watched the film a few years ago and didn't even realise it was a book. I was a bit sceptical at first but it's fantastic. The story kicks in straight away and it's written in a way that makes you really feel the effects of the drug in Eddie's system. He goes from being a struggling, jaded writer to frankly an amazing, intellectual, knowledge hungry and often scary person under MDT's effects.

The story is well thought out and even though there are technical bits in there about stock markets and I watched the film a few years ago and didn't even realise it was a book. The story is well thought out and even though there are technical bits in there about stock markets and design that you might want to gloss over let's face it, they're hardly amazing subjects I didn't - and I'm glad.

Every word in the book has a purpose and you can't afford to miss any. The dialogue and scene setting was good, and I sympathised with Eddie throughout. I can't remember how the film ended and there are some definite differences between the two, but I much preferred the book. Well worth the read. Jul 22, Danm rated it really liked it. This is the movie Limitless. If you saw the movie, you should still read the book. It's intriguing, and the ending is different.

Remember, this is the original story. I couldn't give it five stars due to some repetitive situations between the halfway and three-quarter points of the book, but still a fun ride. Overall, a recommended read. I look forward to reading Winterland, even though I haven't even looked to see what it's about yet. Small tip before I get around writing a full review: Book had my full attention till first pages or so then it fell apart.

Ending was like Meh. Movie was way better than book for its sheer visual brilliance and especially for its convincing ending. Quite the engaging read; obvious padding from the movie's plot in certain parts in the beginning, which is what a book, given its enormous leeway is wont to do.

I initially presumed this book was based on the movie Limitless which itself was based on th0e novel 'Dark Fields', However, it's just a republished tie in with the movie.

Quarter way into the book, it's not quite evident that the various little rivulets that appear in the plot will eventually lead to a confluence that alters the story ar Quite the engaging read; obvious padding from the movie's plot in certain parts in the beginning, which is what a book, given its enormous leeway is wont to do.

Quarter way into the book, it's not quite evident that the various little rivulets that appear in the plot will eventually lead to a confluence that alters the story arc, ever so slightly, but with enough impetus to be more than just an alternative series of events that leads to an altogether removed conclusion from the movie. Where the movie leads onto a tale of realignment and redemption, the book's denouement takes the route of implicit parable with a morbid finality.

Don't fly too near to the sun Icarus. The crafting of the narrative is replete with machinations which seem to ascribe to the populous notion of "don't do drugs kids, nothing good can ever come out of it. This is evident when greedy and haste decisions, pivotal to moving the plot along are in stark opposition to what taking the drug entails - to enhance all cognitive abilities, including judgement and supposed superior wisdom it allows, since, when all facts past and present are not only readily and instantly available but exporable at superhuman levels of scrutiny and analysis.

Chalk it upto hubris I suppose, oh yeah and drugs. Apart a few other similar bits and the pessimistic turn of events tend to detract from the book, but then it's probably personal bias. Otherwise a good read, actually made me want to watch the movie again.

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