Making things happen pdf


 

Items 1 - 10 Making Things Happen. Mastering Project Management. Scott Berkun. O' REILLY8. Beijing • Cambridge • Farnham • Koln • Paris • Sebastopol. In the updated edition of this critically acclaimed and bestselling book, Microsoft project veteran Scott Berkun offers a collection of essays on field-tested. Making Things Happen: Mastering Project Management (Theory in Practice) The Leader's Handbook: Making Things Happen Getting Things Done.

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Making Things Happen Pdf

Making Things Happen. Mastering Project Management. Scott Berkun. O'REILLY ®. Beijing • Cambridge • Farnham • Köln • Paris • Sebastopol • Taipei • Tokyo. O'Reilly just kicked off some PR for the release of Making things happen with a write-up on their blog a spiffy new press release, and to. PDF | We explore some logics of change, focusing on commands to change the world in such a way that certain elementary propositions become true or false.

Making Things Happen: A Theory of Causal Explanation James Woodward Abstract This book develops a manipulationist theory of causation and explanation: causal and explanatory relationships are relationships that are potentially exploitable for purposes of manipulation and control. The resulting theory is a species of counterfactual theory that I claim avoids the difficulties and counterexamples that have infected alternative accounts of causation and explanation, from the Deductive-Nomological model onwards. One of the key concepts in this theory is the notion of an intervention, which is an idealization of the notion of an experimental manipulation that is stripped o More This book develops a manipulationist theory of causation and explanation: causal and explanatory relationships are relationships that are potentially exploitable for purposes of manipulation and control. One of the key concepts in this theory is the notion of an intervention, which is an idealization of the notion of an experimental manipulation that is stripped of its anthropocentric elements. This notion is used to provide a characterization of causal relationships that is non-reductive but also not viciously circular. Relationships that correctly tell us how the value of one variable Y would change under interventions on a second variable Y are invariant. The notion of an invariant relationship is more helpful than the notion of a law of nature the notion on which philosophers have traditionally relied in understanding how explanation and causal attribution work in the special sciences.

In my opinion, however, both of them are, for all intents and purposes, great inno- vators and, de facto, designers. And their stories say a lot about what designers could and should do in this field. Democratic Psychiatry Franco Basaglia was an exceptional psychiatrist who, in the s, founded the Democratic Psychiatry movement.

These groups were real enterprises—not entities whose very existence depended on finan- cial backing from the state. Why did he do it?

Hearing impairment prevention in developing countries: making things happen

The path laid out 40 years ago in Trieste by Basaglia has since become normal practice in Italy or at least it should be. In , as a result of his efforts, a national law was passed that opened up all psychiatric hospitals and set up new forms of assistance to the mentally ill. For example, a cooperative of ex-patients currently runs a bar, restau- rant, and bookshop in the ex-psychiatric hospital in Milan and every year organizes an important cultural festival.

Driven by the same basic motivation, Slow Food looked at and supported the supply and valorization of food products that would gradually disappear if nothing were done because they were not economically viable in the economics of the dominant agro-industrial system.

In practical terms, Slow Food has cultivated food awareness on the demand side through the actions of consumer-producer organizations: the Condotte known outside Italy as Convivia.

Consequently, it has spurred the growth of a market for these high-quality products. On the supply side, it has networked with farmers, breeders, fish- ermen, and the firms that process their products, and has estab- lished and promoted local organizations the Presidia to backing the suppliers and processors by connecting them to each other and to their market. Basaglia and Petrini, and the teams they worked with to set up Democratic Psychiatry and Slow Food, have been the drivers of very meaningful and radical social changes.

And the changes they made were carried out through their two extraordinary strategic design initiatives. In fact, both men managed to link the concrete 5 Carlo Petrini, Slow Food Nation: Why local activities in which they were involved with far-reaching Our Food Should Be Good, Clean and visions that ultimately brought people together, awakening the Fair Milano: Rizzoli, DesignIssues: Volume 30, Number 1 Winter 59 Basaglia, through Democratic Psychiatry, proposed a more general discourse on democracy and civilization.

PDF Making Things Happen: Mastering Project Management (Theory in Practice (O'Reilly)) Book

At the same time, beyond the discourse, the process of change had to be adequately supported—facilities services, places, and tools had to be avail- able to enable people in this case the mentally ill to overcome their difficulties and fulfill their potential capabilities.

Petrini through Slow Food followed a similar course in artic- ulating a radical new vision of what an advanced, sustainable food system could be like.

Bottom-Up: When Social Innovation is Driven by Local Communities To illustrate bottom-up innovation, I could refer to a variety of everyday life innovations, but to better explain them and their specificity, I begin by considering two beautiful and successful stories of radical change on the local scale. The majority of GreenThumb gardens were derelict vacant lots.

Today, hundreds of community gardens in New York City are located in all five bor- oughs and host a wide range of different activities.

The volunteer gardeners, who are the backbone of this sys- tem, are very diverse in age and background. They plant and maintain trees, shrubs, and flowers; hold events and educational workshops; produce local urban food; and open the garden to the public every day during fixed time periods. They went to villages, about a two-hour drive from the city, and found that traditional agriculture models—though strug- gling—still survived in the remote countryside. Thanks to Ainonghui and the direct links it has created between citizens and farmers, the incomes allow the farmers to sustain traditional farming and to lead a bet- ter and respected life.

Several farmers have returned to the coun- tryside to join in the organic food network. The list could continue, touching on every area of daily life. To do so, they had to: 1 re discover the power of coop- Milano, DesignIssues: Volume 30, Number 1 Winter 61 their own resources, without waiting for a general change in the politics, in the economy, or in the institutional and infrastructural assets of the system.

We refer to these groups as creative commu- nities: people who cooperate in inventing, enhancing, and managing via- ble solutions for new and sustainable ways of living. How can we organize the daily functions of the elderly if the family no longer provides the support it traditionally offered and the state no longer has the means to organize the requested services? How can we respond to the demand for natural food and healthy living conditions when living in a global metropolis? These questions are as day-to-day as they are radical.

In spite of its overwhelming offer of products and services, the dominant pro- duction and consumption system is unable to give answers to these very basic questions. These groups of people have been able to answer them by applying their creativity to break with main- stream models of thinking and doing and by conceiving and enhancing new ways of doing, based on original combinations of existing products, services, and knowledge.

This means participating as peers with other actors involved in creative community building and in collaborative service co-design.

In this modality, designers have to facilitate the convergence of different partners toward shared ideas and potential solutions. This kind of activity requires a set of new 11 Anna Meroni, Creative Communities: design skills: promoting collaboration among diverse People Inventing Sustainable Ways of Living Milano: Polidesign, And their stories say a lot about what designers could and should do in this field.

Democratic Psychiatry Franco Basaglia was an exceptional psychiatrist who, in the s, founded the Democratic Psychiatry movement. These groups were real enterprises—not entities whose very existence depended on finan- cial backing from the state. Why did he do it? The answer is both simple and revolutionary: Baldini Castoldi Dalai, The path laid out 40 years ago in Trieste by Basaglia has since become normal practice in Italy or at least it should be.

In , as a result of his efforts, a national law was passed that opened up all psychiatric hospitals and set up new forms of assistance to the mentally ill.

For example, a cooperative of ex-patients currently runs a bar, restau- rant, and bookshop in the ex-psychiatric hospital in Milan and every year organizes an important cultural festival.

Making Things Happen and Getting Things Done - PDF Drive

Its manifesto begins with the words: Its vision goes on to say: Driven by the same basic motivation, Slow Food looked at and supported the supply and valorization of food products that would gradually disappear if nothing were done because they were not economically viable in the economics of the dominant agro-industrial system.

In practical terms, Slow Food has cultivated food awareness on the demand side through the actions of consumer-producer organizations: Consequently, it has spurred the growth of a market for these high-quality products.

On the supply side, it has networked with farmers, breeders, fish- ermen, and the firms that process their products, and has estab- lished and promoted local organizations the Presidia to backing the suppliers and processors by connecting them to each other and to their market.

Basaglia and Petrini, and the teams they worked with to set up Democratic Psychiatry and Slow Food, have been the drivers of very meaningful and radical social changes. And the changes they made were carried out through their two extraordinary strategic design initiatives.

Why local activities in which they were involved with far-reaching Our Food Should Be Good, Clean and visions that ultimately brought people together, awakening the Fair Milano: Rizzoli, Why Our Food small things that each of them were able to do. Rizzoli Ex Libris, At the same time, beyond the discourse, the process of change had to be adequately supported—facilities services, places, and tools had to be avail- able to enable people in this case the mentally ill to overcome their difficulties and fulfill their potential capabilities.

Petrini through Slow Food followed a similar course in artic- ulating a radical new vision of what an advanced, sustainable food system could be like. When Social Innovation is Driven by Local Communities To illustrate bottom-up innovation, I could refer to a variety of everyday life innovations, but to better explain them and their specificity, I begin by considering two beautiful and successful stories of radical change on the local scale.

The majority of GreenThumb gardens were derelict vacant lots. One year Collaborative Services: Polidesign, Today, hundreds of community gardens in New York City are located in all five bor- oughs and host a wide range of different activities.

The volunteer gardeners, who are the backbone of this sys- tem, are very diverse in age and background. They plant and maintain trees, shrubs, and flowers; hold events and educational workshops; produce local urban food; and open the garden to the public every day during fixed time periods.

They went to villages, about a two-hour drive from the city, and found that traditional agriculture models—though strug- gling—still survived in the remote countryside. With the intention of helping the poor farmers while developing a stable channel of good, organic food, they founded a social enterprise: Thanks to Ainonghui and the direct links it has created between citizens and farmers, the incomes allow the farmers to sustain traditional farming and to lead a bet- ter and respected life.

Several farmers have returned to the coun- tryside to join in the organic food network. The list could continue, touching on every area of daily life.

The book: Making Things Happen

DIS-Indaco, Politecnico di problems. To do so, they had to: We refer to these groups as creative commu- nities: How can we have more green spaces in our neigh- borhood? How can we organize the daily functions of the elderly if the family no longer provides the support it traditionally offered and the state no longer has the means to organize the requested services? How can we respond to the demand for natural food and healthy living conditions when living in a global metropolis?

These questions are as day-to-day as they are radical. In spite of its overwhelming offer of products and services, the dominant pro- duction and consumption system is unable to give answers to these very basic questions.

These groups of people have been able to answer them by applying their creativity to break with main- stream models of thinking and doing and by conceiving and enhancing new ways of doing, based on original combinations of existing products, services, and knowledge.

However, they are design-led processes with a particular characteristic: This means participating as peers with other actors involved in creative community building and in collaborative service co-design. In this modality, designers have to facilitate the convergence of different partners toward shared ideas and potential solutions. This kind of activity requires a set of new 11 Anna Meroni, Creative Communities: Transformation Design London: Design Council, ; Hilary Cottam and whom they collaborate.

In this mode designers have to conceptualize and develop solutions for specific collaborative services and other enabling artifacts e. However, a closer observation indicates that social inno- vation, both in its starting move and in its long-term existence, often depends on more complex interactions between very diverse initiatives, where the ones undertaken directly by the people con- cerned bottom-up are often supported by different kinds of inter- vention provided by institutions, civic organizations, or companies top-down.

We refer to these interactions as hybrid processes. For instance, a micro-nursery exists because of the active participation of the mothers and fathers involved. However, it might have been started when the parents looked to the experi- ences of other groups and eventually interacted with some of them , and it might be backed up by specific top-down initiatives and enabling tools, such as a guidebook indicating step-by-step procedures to be followed in starting up and managing such a nursery; support from local authorities in its assessment to guar- antee its conformity to established standards ; and the support of a centralized service in case of educational or medical problems that cannot be solved within the nursery itself.

The hybrid nature of these social innovation processes becomes increasingly evident as the scale of change to be achieved increases. One project that aims at social change on a regional scale makes the hybrid nature of social innovation much clearer. The strategic vision of the project focuses on the mutual advantage represented by the proximity of city and park, fostering the relationship between the city and the productive countryside through the de-mediatiation of the agri-food chain.

The final aim of the project is to create a sustainable and innovative metro-agricultural regional model. The designers used scenario building to open the discussion with the stakeholders enrolled, and to align interested groups on a vision and some directions. Conversation with the interested communities about the scenario took place in a series of contextual workshops facilitated by design researchers with specifically designed tools e.

Using service prototypes, Feeding Milan has started a set of new design initiatives to make some of the envisioned solutions become real.

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