Theory of knowledge for ib diploma pdf


 

Preview Theory of Knowledge for the IB Diploma (second edition), Richard van de Lagemaat, Cambridge University Press. Download Now: terney.info?book=X [PDF] Theory of Knowledge for the IB Diploma Kindle #ebook #full #read #pdf #online. of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IB DP), which all RQ# 4: What are students' and teachers' perceptions toward the TOK course (i.e.

Author:USHA LECHELT
Language:English, Spanish, Hindi
Country:Bahamas
Genre:Science & Research
Pages:546
Published (Last):10.12.2015
ISBN:455-5-72971-828-2
Distribution:Free* [*Registration Required]
Uploaded by: ELENORE

62766 downloads 86121 Views 13.71MB PDF Size Report


Theory Of Knowledge For Ib Diploma Pdf

E-BOOK Theory of Knowledge for the IB Diploma - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. textbook. Does anyone have its PDF version? feedback, and the sharing of knowledge and resources among IB students, alumni, and teachers. These notes are designed to provide an easy-to-use summary of Theory of Knowledge for the IB. Diploma by Richard van de Lagemaat. The notes link to the .

The problem of knowledge 1 The greatest obstacle to progress is not the absence of knowledge but the illusion of knowledge. Daniel Boorstin, — The familiar is not understood simply because it is familiar. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, — By doubting we are led to enquire, and by enquiry we perceive the truth. George Berkeley, — Properly speaking, there is no certainty; there are only people who are certain. Friedrich Nietzsche, — Common sense consists of those layers of prejudice laid down before the age of Albert Einstein, — It is the customary fate of new truths to begin as heresies and to end as superstitions. Huxley, —95 There are two ways to slide easily through life: to believe everything, or to doubt everything; both ways save us from thinking. Alfred Korzybski, — We know too much to be sceptics and too little to be dogmatists. Blaise Pascal, —62 Introduction Introduction W e live in a strange and perplexing world. Despite the explosive growth of knowledge in recent decades, we are confronted by a bewildering array of contradictory beliefs. We are told that astronomers have made great progress in understanding the universe in which we live, yet many people still believe in astrology.

Btw I already found the loophole in their viewing system to download the pages, but I won't do it as it is a preview. Here, http: You're welcome. If I ever find the book I'll add it to the server. Im pretty sure theres one in my school library.

Ill go check and see if theres a dvd. I downloaded node. And the papers you could send either to me at internationalbaccalaureateibo gmail. But I think it's best to wait until they are officially released because there's no PDF of them, just scans or photos.

Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. All rights reserved. IBO comments. Want to join?

IB Diploma Programme | SCIS - Hongqiao Campus

Log in or sign up in seconds. Submit a new link. Submit a new text post.

Get an ad-free experience with special benefits, and directly support Reddit. We will update this area when there are some AMAs. Do not ask for unreleased papers. Flairs Make sure to choose a flair for your username!

Albert Einstein, — It is the customary fate of new truths to begin as heresies and to end as superstitions. Huxley, —95 There are two ways to slide easily through life: to believe everything, or to doubt everything; both ways save us from thinking.

Alfred Korzybski, — We know too much to be sceptics and too little to be dogmatists. Blaise Pascal, —62 Introduction Introduction W e live in a strange and perplexing world.

Despite the explosive growth of knowledge in recent decades, we are confronted by a bewildering array of contradictory beliefs. We are told that astronomers have made great progress in understanding the universe in which we live, yet many people still believe in astrology. Scientists claim that the dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago, yet some insist that dinosaurs and human beings lived simultaneously.

Apollo 11 landed on the moon in , but it is rumoured in some quarters that the landings were faked by NASA. A work of art is hailed as a masterpiece by some critics and dismissed as junk by others. Some people support capital punishment, while others dismiss it as a vestige of barbarism. Faced with such a confusion of different opinions, how are we to make sense of things and develop a coherent picture of reality?

Given your school education, you might think of knowledge as a relatively unproblematic commodity consisting of various facts found in textbooks that have been proved to be true. But things are not as simple as that. This suggests that knowledge is not static, but has a history and changes over time. So what guarantee is there that our current understanding of things is correct?

Despite the intellectual progress of the last five hundred years, future generations may look back on our much-vaunted achievements and dismiss our science as crude, our arts as naive, and our ethics as barbaric. KT — common sense: cultural beliefs and practices generally considered to be true without need for any further justification When we consider ourselves from the perspective of the vast reaches of time and space, further doubts arise.

According to cosmologists, the universe has been in existence for about If we imagine that huge amount of time compressed into one year running from January to December, then the earliest human beings do not appear on the scene until around Since we have been trying to make sense of the world in a systematic way for only a minute fraction of time, there is no guarantee that we have got it right.

Furthermore, it turns out that in cosmic terms we are also fairly small.

Yet we flatter ourselves that we have discovered the laws that apply to all times and all places. Since we are familiar with only a minute fraction of the universe, this seems like a huge leap of faith. Perhaps it will turn out that some of the deeper truths about life, the universe and everything are simply beyond human comprehension.

While there may be something to be said for this view, the trouble is that much of what passes for common sense consists of little more than vague and untested beliefs that are based on such things as prejudice, hearsay and blind appeals to authority.

Moreover, many things that at first seem obvious to common sense become less and less obvious the closer you look at them. KT — mental map: a personal mental picture of what is true and false, reasonable and unreasonable, right and wrong, beautiful and ugly Yet we need some kind of picture of what the world is like if we are to cope with it effectively, and common sense at least provides us with a starting point.

We all have what might be called a mental map of reality, which includes our ideas of what is true and what is false, what is reasonable and what is unreasonable, what is right and what is wrong, etc.

Although only a fool would tell you to rip up your mental map and abandon your everyday understanding of things, you should — at least occasionally — be willing to subject it to critical scrutiny.

Theory of knowledge for the ib diploma richard van de lagemaat pdf

To illustrate the limitations of our common-sense understanding of things, let us make an analogy between our mental maps and real geographical maps. Consider the map of the world shown below, which is based on what is known as the Mercator Projection. If you were familiar with this map as you grew up, you may unthinkingly accept it as true and be unaware of its limitations.

Figure 1. Think of as many different ways as you can in which the world map shown in Figure 1. Do you think it would be possible to make a perfect map of a city? What would such a map have to look like? How useful would it be? Among the weaknesses of the map in Figure 1. It distorts the relative size of the land masses, so that areas further from the equator seem larger than they are in reality. The distortion is most apparent when we compare Greenland to Africa.

Navigointi

According to the map they are about the same size, but in reality Africa is fourteen times bigger than Greenland. It is based on the convention that the northern hemisphere is at the top of the map and the southern hemisphere at the bottom. The map is Eurocentric in that it not only exaggerates the relative size of Europe, but also puts it in the middle of the map.

The fact that most people find this map disorienting illustrates the grip that habitual ways of thinking have on our minds and how difficult it is to break out of them. The point of this excursion into maps is to suggest that, like the Mercator Projection, our common-sense mental maps may give us a distorted picture of reality. Our ideas and beliefs come from a variety of sources, such as our own experience, parents, friends, teachers, Figure 1.

Furthermore, it can be difficult for us to think outside the customs and conventions with which we are familiar and see that there may be other ways of looking at things. Finally, there may be all kinds of cultural biases built into our picture of the world. If you ask an English person to name the greatest writer and greatest scientist of all time, they will probably say Shakespeare and Newton. If you ask the same question to an Italian, they are more likely to say Dante and Galileo.

Meanwhile in China they will boast about their four great inventions — the compass, gunpowder, paper-making and printing — and urge you to read The Dream of the Red Chamber by Cao Xueqin — One final point to draw out of this discussion is that, while different maps may be more or less useful for different purposes, there is no such thing as a perfect map. A perfect map of a city which included every detail down to the last brick and blade of grass would have to be drawn on a scale of Such a map would, of course, be useless as a map, and would in any case quickly become out of date.

We might call this the paradox of cartography: if a map is to be useful, then it will necessarily be imperfect. There will, then, always be a difference between a map and the underlying territory it describes. What do you think of the title of the painting? What has this got to do with our discussion?

For it has often been thought that certainty is what distinguishes knowledge from mere belief. The idea here is that when you know something you are certain it is true and have no doubts about it; but when you merely believe it, you may think it is true, but you are not certain. At first sight, this seems reasonable enough; but when you start to look critically at the things we normally claim to know, you may begin to wonder if any of them are completely certain!

Can you come to any agreement?