Waking the tiger ebook


 

Editorial Reviews. Review. "Every life contains difficulties we are not prepared for . [Listen] Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Health, Fitness & Dieting. Nature's Lessons in Healing Trauma Waking the Tiger offers a new and hopeful vision of trauma. It views the human animal as a unique being, endowed with. Download Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma Download at: http://epicofebook. com/?book=X [PDF] Download Waking the Tiger.

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Waking The Tiger Ebook

Waking the Tiger offers a new and hopeful vision of trauma. It views the human animal as a unique being, endowed with an instinctual capacity. Waking the Tiger-Healing Trauma is sponsored by the Society for the Study of Waking the Tiger introduces Somatic Experiencing, an original and scientific. Listen to "Waking the Tiger Healing Trauma" by Peter A. Levine available from Rakuten Kobo. Narrated by Chris Sorensen. Start a free day trial today and get.

Shelves: psychology , trauma I love the hero's tale. A quick glance of my other reviews will confirm as much. But I also believe those wonderful tales perform a valuable purpose. They can provide guidance for difficult transitions through the use of symbols and metaphor. Levine's book was a useful discussion on healing trauma. Don't expect a lot of "inspiring" stories or case examples like psychology books often contain. Peter Levine made an explicit connection between trauma, and in this case, the tale of the hero Perseus a I love the hero's tale. Peter Levine made an explicit connection between trauma, and in this case, the tale of the hero Perseus and the Gorgon Medusa. When Levine spoke of trauma, it was a buffet of any trauma the world can devise: cPTSD, war veterans, car crashes, death in family, abuse, toxic parenting, surgery, etc For instance, in Section IV, Levine offered advise on immediate 'emotional first aid' to be used to address trauma involving a car crash think EMTs and for children He suspects, often the ones most impacted but last to get help. Levine wrote, "In the myth of Medusa, anyone who looked directly into her eyes would quickly turn to stone. Such is the case with trauma. If we attempt to confront trauma head on, it will continue to do what it it has already done - immobilize us in fear.

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Ebook pdf. Upcoming SlideShare. Like this document? Why not share! An annual anal Embed Size px. Healing Trauma North Atlantic Books, , aimed at a general readership, was very successful. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Waking the Tiger First edition cover of Waking the Tiger.

British Psychological Society. Archived from the original on Retrieved March Waking the Tiger, Healing Trauma". Psychosomatic Medicine. New York: Random House. Psychology Today. Retrieved from " https: Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history.

Languages Add links. This page was last edited on 16 March , at By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. First edition cover of Waking the Tiger. I wouldn't have either, if I met with a therapist who refused to believe my account of my own experience and tried to fit it into some pre-concieved pattern of reactions.

Read Judith Herman instead. View 1 comment. Nov 01, Antigone rated it it was amazing Shelves: Okay, consider my mind blown. And that's not easy to do. It's especially difficult when starting off with such an unfortunate title which evokes nothing quite so much as the beleaguered Ralph Macchio's dojo. Add to this the author's trademark of his treatment method - meaning every time he mentions the name it comes up in the text with a registration symbol.

Cue jazz hands and a laser spot. Top it off with the sad truth that metaphors are not his friends. Be it myth, the environment or the an Okay, consider my mind blown. Be it myth, the environment or the animal world; no matter where he aims for comparison his connections misfire. Taking all that into account To set the charge, light the fuse, and blow the contents of a mind? Sometimes the guy with the vision doesn't present well. And maybe that's because all the energy it would take to explain the thing is tied up in discerning it.

I don't know. What I do know is that people who have been traumatized are in hell. All the time. This is a torment that knows no relief. No safety, no trust, no peace, no passage, no meaning or purpose. Serenity is virtually unachievable. Calm is something they front just to function. Imagine being on high alert twenty-four seven. Imagine an internal scream that hasn't ended in recent memory.

Peter Levine has spent thirty years of his professional life in an active attempt to address that - which is a big thing when you consider how very many of his colleagues seem content to prescribe a pill and focus on increasing levels of day-to-day tolerance, as if this distress were to be logically accommodated as life's New Normal.

For that alone, kudos doc. Major props to you. But on to the theory. Levine operates under the premise that there exists an ancient system in the brain, what humans had at the dawn of evolution, and it deals primarily with aggression, dominance, territoriality and ritual behaviors. He contends that this reptilian system you might be more familiar with the trending term "lizard brain" is where the psyche is caught in cases of trauma, and where it must be treated.

This makes sense. And because this is the most primitive of systems, it has a much closer connection with the body. It's basically hard-wired into the physical, so physicality plays a significant role in both the distress itself and the healing. It is Dr. Levine's belief that trauma is the result of an incomplete physical reaction to a catastrophic event.

The ground-breaking nature of this idea is, of course, the physical component. Therapeutic professionals have focused for decades on the intellectual and emotional aspects of the traumatic puzzle - attempting to guide their patients through a careful exploration of thought, feeling, memory and belief.

The body has been viewed, for the most part, merely as an indicator of distress; a reporter of the internal reality; a thermometer, so to speak, of the current psychological temperature. Levine insists it is not. He tells us the body, itself, needs to complete the cycle of reaction to the catastrophe it has experienced, and until it does it will be caught in that event and bleeding off excess energy into panic attacks, migraines, sleep disorders and just about anything else you might require a tranquilizer to amend.

Once he lands on the solid ground of his expertise in trauma - introducing his research, citing case histories, elaborating on specific treatment directions - the chapters sail by at a swift and energizing clip. There are exercises included for those who wish to explore his methodology on their own, although he is adamant about pacing and backing off when overwhelmed. Should the desire exist for some form of supervision, he suggests a therapist be brought on board and the book shared toward a mutual endeavor.

Waking the Tiger

The chapters at the end of the work are devoted to instructions on how to assist both adults and children in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event. I found the ideas Dr. Levine introduced to be fascinating, and they've certainly served to connect many of my own perceptions to a more direct and comprehensive understanding.

If trauma is a study or condition you have any interest in, I would recommend this book. View all 5 comments. Feb 02, Kerry rated it really liked it Shelves: I love the hero's tale. A quick glance of my other reviews will confirm as much. But I also believe those wonderful tales perform a valuable purpose.

They can provide guidance for difficult transitions through the use of symbols and metaphor. Levine's book was a useful discussion on healing trauma. Don't expect a lot of "inspiring" stories or case examples like psychology books often contain. Peter Levine made an explicit connection between trauma, and in this case, the tale of the hero Perseus a I love the hero's tale.

Peter Levine made an explicit connection between trauma, and in this case, the tale of the hero Perseus and the Gorgon Medusa. When Levine spoke of trauma, it was a buffet of any trauma the world can devise: For instance, in Section IV, Levine offered advise on immediate 'emotional first aid' to be used to address trauma involving a car crash think EMTs and for children He suspects, often the ones most impacted but last to get help.

Levine wrote, "In the myth of Medusa, anyone who looked directly into her eyes would quickly turn to stone. Such is the case with trauma. If we attempt to confront trauma head on, it will continue to do what it it has already done - immobilize us in fear.

Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma

Before Perseus set out to conquer Medusa, he was warned by Athena not to look directly at the Gorgon. Heeding the goddess's wisdom, he used his shield the reflect Medusa's image: Likewise, the solution to vanquishing trauma comes not confronting it directly, but by working with its reflection, mirrored in our instinctual responses.

Levine felt, it was just our evolved higher stage neo-cortex human brain which had mucked up the experience and over-ridden our instinctual mind and our ability to shake-off a bad event.

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In a simplistic sense, I suppose the more instinctual mind would flee like a rat from a sinking ship the moment a relationship became abusive, or a soldier in his instinctual mind would go no where near a raging battlefield.

But we humans can remain fixed in a situation, both physically and mentally, and in many cases suffer, locked in a vigilant and hyper-sensitive stance that will become our new emotional mind. Continuing, Levine described the human brain's three levels and the experience of the hunted gazelle. The layers are: An aside, I seem to recall other mammals can show signs of stress as well, harder to measure an elephant's trauma, I suppose. Levine may be oversimplified in his view of animals. Levine's premise is that while the neo-cortex is not strong enough to override the primitive instincts to flee, fight or freeze in the face of danger, it is strong enough to lock those reactions into a frozen state that may last days, weeks, years, that we know most familiarly as a veteran's PTSD but it can be any trauma.

In Section II, Levine went directly into the symptoms of trauma. These are the fundamentals of the traumatic reaction including: Hyperarousal, Constriction, Dissociation, Helplessness.

Valuable information present in an accessible way for neo-cortex bound humans to help recognize that our Medusa may be near. He acknowledged this may be a just quick rehash for professionals and learned laymen.

What Levine had to offer to the subject, besides an appealing hero's tale framing of the subject area, is the idea of beginning the healing process with FELT SENSE , or internal body sensations.

The term was coined by Eugene Gendlin in his book Focusing. Levine admitted this is a hard term to define. Gendlin wrote, "A felt sense is not a mental experience but a physical one. This is part of Levine's program called Somantic Experiencing a registered trademark Best if you read the book if this sounds promising. Or just jump to the chase and hit the web page: Somantic Experiencing: Traumatic Institute Reconnecting with body to help heal the mind.

In completing the recovery from a trauma, we go back to the story of Medusa. When Medusa was slain two things emerged from the body: Pegasus, the winged horse, and Chrysaor, a warrior with a golden sword.

The sword symbolizes absolute truth, the mythic heroes ultimate weapon of defense. It conveys a sense of clarity and triumph, of rising to meet extraordinary challenges, and of ultimate resourcefulness. The horse signifies instinctual grounding, while wings create Getting in touch with trauma is not only an exercise in feeling starting with how your butt feels in your chair, somantic experience, though it has a place for the disconnected.

Though it probably easily works with mindfulness, exercise and talk therapy that embraces a role for connecting with our physical body. Interestingly, Levine also brought up the world of shamanic rituals and the old belief that trauma was often addressed as a community issue. An important aspect to consider. Maybe look into Brene Browns' book, Daring Greatly: The community aspect reminded of stories of the Bataan Death March and the forced use of prisoners to build roads and facilities in WWII.

Trauma in the extreme example, the weak were bayoneted by the road, no health care was provided, and there was very little food. A common trait of the survivors: A human connection to life where everything else was inhuman in nature.

Taking care of others can help form trust and mutual care. Unless the other is a narcissist, or is the reason for the trauma, etc The suggestion that community played a role in healing trauma and that trauma is a natural reaction to bad experiences is also a important element.

Mostly, I tend agree with Levine, looking at the trauma directly and reliving it is at best not helpful his clinical practice strongly affirmed this view , at worst, only making matters worse. I'm not a counselor but I've watched them on TV. A real heroes journey. Jul 16, Polaris rated it it was ok. I have rather mixed feelings about this book. Being an asshole, I'll start with the negative ones.

On the downside, this book is not well written. Sometimes the tone is downright condescending. Then there's the issue of credibility. The author bases his views on his practice as therapist.

He really does that to the max: No footnotes or endnotes. Typically, when another book is quoted, that book is a work of fiction. I take no issue in takin I have rather mixed feelings about this book.

I take no issue in taking examples and inspiration from fiction, yet I do take issue in that Levine, despite his dual doctoral degrees, seems completely unconcerned with psychological science. He talks about "energies" which he does not specify, and towards the end, we even discuss "vortices of energy".

A vortex of trauma energy and a vortex of healing energy. Unsurprisingly, no source. Okay, if you say so? Sometimes functions of the brain are brushed upon, but even that doesn't happen in a pop science, informative way. It's more that Levine is very taken with the more poetical metaphors: He takes quite a bit of inspiration from shamanic practices, but he doesn't spell those out either, so where this book stands is precisely Levine's personal work.

It's not a pop science book: It's not a shamanic healing manual. It's not even about Levine's clients. It's about Levine's personal mindscape insofar as his work with trauma patients is concerned. And then there's the issue, which pretty much boils down to the bad writing, of how the author writes about rape as described by another reviewer.

Now, I read Levine as meaning that whether you've been raped or whether the trauma has some other cause, does not matter to whether you can heal or how the healing process can be helped.

However, Levine places his words in very unfortunate ways which definitely give space to another, revolting, reading.

Waking the Tiger - Wikipedia

While I have no wish to entertain the thought that Levine would believe it doesn't matter if you've been raped or not, I do think that readers of books on trauma written by therapists are entitled to expect sensitive, well thought-out language that can help, not belittle survivors reading the book.

Now for the upside: Levine's personal mindscape is interesting. I like the way Levine spells out that trauma doesn't just occur from war and violence, but that completely benign situations, like medical procedures, can also traumatize.

There is no rule to what can cause trauma. It's all about the subjective experience. I like the way Levine advocates against dwelling on the traumatic incident or playing detective, for example, about whether something horrible really did happen to one as a child or whether that's a false memory.

Levine says this doesn't help with healing, and that the healing process can be aided in the same ways regardless of whether the memory matches the objective facts or not. Of course, in case of violence, it's good to bring the perpetrator to justice, but that's a separate matter.

My hunch agrees with Levine's hunch. I like the way Levine advocates intermingling the traumatic memories with empowering elements to be able to renegotiate them - to create a personal myth where one is a hero rather than a victim in the situation. This doubtless is one of the parts that draw strongly from shamanism. I especially like how Levine pays a lot of attention to how the whole body, and not just the brain, is affected by trauma -- and how paying attention to the body can help resolve trauma.

This corroborates with some of my own experiences. In a way, I'd say this book should not be read as a psychology book. It should be read as a magical manual, much as if you were reading Carlos Castaneda or, say, Silver RavenWolf sorry, I just had to: To what extent does my universe match the subjective world of the writer?

Are some of his practices useful for my practice? As the comparisons to Castaneda and RavenWolf above indicate, I'm not convinced this is that good a magical manual, but there is something to be gleaned from almost any source.

I did take something from reading this. You might, as well. But another book on the topic might have more substance. View 2 comments. Jan 27, Nathaniel rated it really liked it. He uses numerous examples from the animal kingdom along with case studies of his own patients to argue that people can make a complete and healthy recovery from trauma by somatically renegotiating their traumatic experience.

His contention is that the tremendous energies mobilized to defend us in moments of fear and danger can become trapped within us if they are not allowed to discharge themselves or to complete their functions. Even if he is only partially or occasionally right, his strategies can help anyone to explore ways that trauma may be influencing their behavior or the behavior of their loved ones.

He then offers an empowering framework for engaging with these vestiges of trauma, both in ourselves and in others. The warning that totally routine dental and medical procedures or minor accidents can be traumatizing to young people who do not understand them seems to be particularly relevant.

I think anyone in the medical profession and everyone with young children should read this book to make sure that they can better accompany young people through experiences that are perceived as threatening. This book has definitely changed the way that I will interact with people who have just been through something traumatic-—and how many books actually make you change the way you behave during extremely important moments of your life? Oct 27, Steve Woods rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is an outstanding piece of work.

It was published in and I added it to my reading list in and it has sat on my shelf for over two years. Just the luck of the draw I suppose, but in reading it my one disappointment is that I didn't do so years ago.