The aquariums of pyongyang epub


 

The Aquariums of Pyongyang: Ten Years in the North Korean Gulag by Chol- hwan Kang. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. ((DOWNLOAD)) EPUB The Aquariums of Pyongyang: Ten Years in the North Korean Gulag Ebook | READ ONLINE For download this book. DOWNLOAD The Aquariums of Pyongyang: Ten Years in the North Korean Gulag By Chol-hwan Kang, Pierre Rigoulot [PDF EBOOK EPUB KINDLE]. Just Book.

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The Aquariums Of Pyongyang Epub

[Download ebook] The Aquariums of Pyongyang: Ten Years in the North Korean Gulag. The Aquariums of ebooks | Download PDF | *ePub | DOC | audiobook. Get this from a library! The aquariums of Pyongyang: ten years in a North Korean gulag. [Chʻŏr-hwan Kang; Pierre Rigoulot] -- "North Korea is today one of the. The Aquariums of Pyongyang book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The harrowing memoir of life inside North Korea Amid es.

Available on OverDrive. Internet Archive. ProQuest Ebook Central. Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours. Finding libraries that hold this item Freezes the heart and seizes the soul. As the first account to emerge from North Korea, it is destined to become a classic.

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The Aquariums of Pyongyang : Chol-hwan Kang :. The Aquariums of Pyongyang : Ten Years.

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North Korea is today one. He is the author of numerous books on the history of political repression and contributed the.

The Aquariums of Pyongyang: Ten Years in the North Korean Gulag by Kang Chol-Hwan

The aquariums of Pyongyang : ten years in a North Korean. The aquariums of Pyongyang : ten years in a North Korean gulag,. The harrowing memoir of life inside North Korea Amid escalating nuclear tensions, Kim Jong-un and North Korea's other leaders have kept a tight grasp on their one-party state, quashing any nascent opposition movements and sending all suspected dissidents to its brutal concentration camps for "re-education. Sent to the notorious labor camp Yodok when he was nine years old, Kang for ten years observed frequent public executions and endured forced labor and near-starvation rations.

In , he escaped to South Korea, where he found God and now advocates for human rights in North Korea. This record of one man's suffering gives eyewitness proof to the abuses perpetrated by the North Korean regime. Get A Copy.

The Aquariums of Pyongyang

Paperback , pages. Published August 24th by Basic Books first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Aquariums of Pyongyang , please sign up. See 1 question about The Aquariums of Pyongyang….

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The Aquariums of Pyongyang

Apr 04, E rated it it was ok Shelves: I'm not sure what it says about me that I can fail the memoir of someone who survived a decade in one of North Korea's most infamous prison camps. From the very beginning I was somewhat skeptical. The back cover promotes the book as what George W.

Bush read when he wanted to learn more about the DRPK prior to dubbing it part of the Axis of Evil, and the author writes in the Preface that "I now realize that the Lord wanted me to use President Bush to let the blind world see what is happening to H I'm not sure what it says about me that I can fail the memoir of someone who survived a decade in one of North Korea's most infamous prison camps.

Bush read when he wanted to learn more about the DRPK prior to dubbing it part of the Axis of Evil, and the author writes in the Preface that "I now realize that the Lord wanted me to use President Bush to let the blind world see what is happening to His people in the North.

The other thing that rubbed me the wrong way was how Kang presents himself as though he and his family were exceptionally gifted and resourceful, as if exemplary effort was what allowed him to escape. In the last forty pages alone, the reader is informed of how his uncle finished first in his class, how he beat up the toughest gang leader in the village where he lived after leaving Yodok, how his first sip of Coca Cola cured his head cold "almost instantly," and how a South Korean official allegedly told him "of all the renegades I've met, you have suffered among the most.

View 1 comment. Dec 28, Lori rated it liked it Shelves: The rating I am giving this book is for the writing , not the story. The writing tends toward overly flowery and even tedious "nocturnal visitation" for dream, for heaven's sake and I had a very hard time pushing myself through the sentences.

I also read this book after reading Escape from Camp One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West , which was about a man who was born in one of the worst of all camps, and against unimaginable odds, escaped.

Because his camp wa The rating I am giving this book is for the writing , not the story. Because his camp was just so much more horrific and the treatment of the prisoners even more inhumane -- if you can believe it -- the story was also more powerful. Perhaps if I'd read this one first, I'd have been even more deeply horrified. But after reading the worst, reading the less-worse feels unfairly of me minimal.

There is a small handful of books addressing the horrors of the North Korean prison camp system.

Read The Orphan Master's Son , a novel but an extraordinarily well-researched novel that seemed like a non-fiction book after I then read Escape From Camp 14 , which told some of the same horrors. And Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea , stories of six ordinary lives in that horrific place. Even a book that is written the way this book is written is worth reading, so I hesitate over criticizing the writing.

But against the few others that cover this ground, the writing does matter. Very worth it. View all 7 comments. Much of Kang Chol-Hwan's memoir of life in North Korea's notorious Yodok prison camp is eye-opening stuff, especially when he tells the story from the inside - he served a ten-year sentence there from the age of nine, as an innocent by-product of being part of an allegedly subversive family.

A lot of it, unsurprisingly, is classic misery-memoir, albeit enhanced considerably by the insight that it gives into North Korean society, particularly from within institutions that even North Koreans aren' Much of Kang Chol-Hwan's memoir of life in North Korea's notorious Yodok prison camp is eye-opening stuff, especially when he tells the story from the inside - he served a ten-year sentence there from the age of nine, as an innocent by-product of being part of an allegedly subversive family.

A lot of it, unsurprisingly, is classic misery-memoir, albeit enhanced considerably by the insight that it gives into North Korean society, particularly from within institutions that even North Koreans aren't supposed to know about tellingly, he reveals - and presumably himself knows - little about the ultra-secret hard-labour camps from which few ever emerge.

As one might expect, life in the camp is relentlessly brutal, with few concessions made for age - children were spared summary executions, but they could just as easily perish in a mine collapse.

The book's downside is that Kang, very possibly for reasons beyond his control which may be partly down to the fact that the book I read was effectively translated from Korean to French to English , isn't an especially compelling narrator, and the book does tend towards the repetitive. I also felt that the final section, in which he successfully escapes the North and ends up as a South Korean citizen via its embassy in Beijing, was somewhat rushed - he clearly couldn't wait to get away, but he conveyed this feeling all too effectively to the reader.

This isn't a spoiler, by the way: Still, as a companion-piece to Barbara Demick's Nothing to Envy still the best account of day-to-day North Korean life that I've read, largely thanks to its plurality of voices , it's an illuminating and often sickening read - not least for the unanswered and possibly unanswerable question of whether Kang's family suffered any further repercussions resulting from his escape.

View 2 comments. Jun 04, Vastaa gorgij rated it it was amazing. May 10, Paula rated it liked it. Another horrific tale of life in the prison that is all of North Korea - this one told about life within a prison itself.

Perhaps because this is the latest in a list of books about All Things North Korean that I've been reading in the last couple of years, I was not as horrified by this story as I was by some of the others I've previous read. A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom" affected me far more deeply, and I would recommend both of those b Another horrific tale of life in the prison that is all of North Korea - this one told about life within a prison itself.

A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom" affected me far more deeply, and I would recommend both of those books over this one. There was an emotional distance in Kang's writing that kept my horror a bit more at bay. Still - I believe any and all books written by or about North Koreans who have managed to escape from that hideous place are worth reading.

A friend happened to be reading this while I was reading Nothing to Envy , and recommended Aquariums of Pyongyang to me. As with one of the people whose story is told in Nothing to Envy , Kang's family is part of the Chosen Soren -- Korean residents of Japan who are sympathetic with North Korea. As a relatively well-off member of North Korean society, his childhood seems rather idyllic until the arrest of his grandfather and the internment of many of his family members in the Yodok camp system.

Fr A friend happened to be reading this while I was reading Nothing to Envy , and recommended Aquariums of Pyongyang to me. From the age of 9 to 19, Kang manages to survive the horrors of living in this system, surviving hunger, disease, brutality, cold through shear will. It's an amazing story. I found the part of the book that dealt with his internment more compelling than the story of his life after release and after his escape to the south. It was interesting to compare his story with those of the interviewees in Nothing to Envy.

Kang got out in the early 90s, before the famine in North Korea was at its worst. Yet as a camp resident, it's almost as if he went through the horror that the rest of the country experienced, only ten years earlier.

I already knew that North Korea was a crazy place, but this book underlines how its regime is both terrifying and utterly odd. In one of the most powerful images in the book, the author looks across the Yalu river one night. On one side is noisy, busy, lit-up China. Some interesting snippets of infor I already knew that North Korea was a crazy place, but this book underlines how its regime is both terrifying and utterly odd.

Some interesting snippets of information I gained: Most cars in South Korea are painted silver. Traditionally, Koreans are born aged 1.

They get a year older not on their birthdays, but every January 1st. However, this is no longer used officially in N. When the author was a child, children in every class displayed a league table showing the physical strength of each child. Fights were then organised between the top-ranking students from different classes. Even if they then divorce, she still belongs to that family, and her own parents will probably reject her if she tries to return home.

If the man marries again, he and his new wife have to live with the ex-wife. The camp inmates were so desperate for clothes that if they were sent to bury someone, they would always strip the body naked first.

Each inmate was allotted one pair of socks to last a year. They ended up wrapping their feet in rat skins most of the time. Before China and South Korea established diplomatic relations in , accepted practice for ships travelling between the two countries was for them to bear Honduran flags. Apr 27, Veeral rated it liked it Shelves: We live in a capitalist world. And here if your grandfather supposedly committed a crime and if is proven guilty, he is going to serve time in jail.

Think of the shame it would bring to your family and relatives. But on the other hand, imagine you are living in North Korea. Well, you guessed it right. Shame is going to be the least of your concerns when someone from your family is alleged of "counter-revolutionary" activities.

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If that happens, you, alongwith all of your relatives are seen as cri We live in a capitalist world. If that happens, you, alongwith all of your relatives are seen as criminals of the nation.

So, off you go to a North Korean gulag. But "Counter-revolutionary"!

Following the North Korean invasion and the American intervention, the war was internationalized, and [Wada] eloquently recounts the roles played by political and military leaders on both sides. His description of the peace negotiations is particularly riveting as American negotiators were as frustrated by their South Korean allies as they were by their opponents. This fine rendering of the conflict provides an important perspective on an unresolved war. For years, left-wing historians have viewed the Korean Conflict as a civil war that the US should have avoided.

Using recently released Russian documents, the author demonstrates that the Korean Conflict was Stalin's war. The emphasis thus is on the war's political and diplomatic history, with just brief reference to the military. It is truly excellent in showing the effects of the war, clearly demonstrating that the chief beneficiaries were Japan and Taiwan; both reaped rewards politically and economically at no cost to themselves.

Extensive documentation, a recent bibliography, a good index, and adequate maps are strengths.

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